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South African Journal of Occupational Therapy

versão On-line ISSN 2310-3833
versão impressa ISSN 0038-2337

S. Afr. j. occup. ther. vol.42 no.1 Pretoria  2012

 

ARTICLES

 

School-based occupational therapists: An exploration into their role in a Cape Metropole full Service school

 

 

Amshuda SondayI; Kerry AndersonII; Catherine FlackII; Cathy FisherII; Jennifer GreenhoughII; Rachel KendalII; Carmen ShadwellII

IBsc Occupational Therapy (University of the Western Cape), Masters Early Childhood Intervention (University of Pretoria). Lecturer, Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town
IIBsc OT (UCT). Fourth year undergraduate students in Occupational Therapy at the time that that this research project was undertaken

Correspondence

 

 


ABSTRACT

School based occupational therapists within the South African context are faced with the challenge of extending their roles within inclusive education.
The following article describes a research study that was conducted by a group of fourth year occupational therapy students in 2006. The purpose of the research was to explore the current role and develop a future perspective for school-based occupational therapists in an inclusive education system in a full service school in the Cape Metropole area. A qualitative phenomenological approach was followed, where semi structured interviews and focus groups were the methods of data collection.
Data was transcribed and analysed inductively using content analysis.The article expands on the following two themes, namely the unclear existing role of the occupational therapist in inclusive schools and diverse and evolving attitudes towards inclusive education. The themes highlight the attitudes and perceptions of teachers, parents and an occupational therapist on inclusive education and explores the possibilities of emerging and transforming roles for occupational therapists willing to engage in this inclusive process.

Key words: Inclusive Education, Full service schools, Roles, Occupational therapist


 

 

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References

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Correspondence:
Amshuda Sonday
a.sonday@uct.ac.za

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