SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online

 
vol.48 issue1Evidence by means of closed circuit television or similar electronic media in South Africa: Does section 158 of the Criminal Procedure Act have extraterritorial application? author indexsubject indexarticles search
Home Pagealphabetic serial listing  

De Jure

On-line version ISSN 2225-7160
Print version ISSN 1466-3597

De Jure (Pretoria) vol.48 n.1 Pretoria  2015

 

Editorial

 

 

"The measure of greatness in a scientific idea is the extent to which it stimulates thought and opens up new lines of research" (Paul Dirac)

With the wise words of Paul Dirac in mind, the editorial board of De Jure has pleasure in presenting the first volume of 2015. As with every volume of De Jure, this volume contains valuable contributions by a variety of academics on a wide variety of topics. A particular feature of this volume relates to the cluster of contributions dealing with consumer law.

In recent years core pieces of legislation have brought about a significant change in the landscape of Consumer Law, not only in South Africa but also internationally. The National Credit Act 34/2005 and the Consumer Protection Act 68/2008 are central to Consumer Law Reform in South Africa. Due to the nature and wording of these pieces of legislation the relevant positions in Africa as well as abroad have become important.

In light of this, the Department of Mercantile Law at the University of Pretoria identified a need for an international platform to provide all role players (Government, academia and members of the legal profession) with the opportunity to exchange information specifically in the area of Consumer Law.

The University of Pretoria International Consumer Law Conference (UPICLC) took place at the University from 25 - 27 September 2014. The conference addressed important issues on International and National Consumer Credit Law and Consumer Protection Law (including key legislative amendments and the latest developments and case law). Many international and national key-note speakers addressed the conference. Specialised plenary sessions and papers during break-away sessions on all relevant topics also formed part of this very successful conference. Some of these presentations were reformed into contributions and now proudly form part of this issue of De Jure.

The volume, in addition, contains valuable discussions on topics such as evidence by means of closed circuit television, life insurance contracts and military intervention in Syria. The De Jure team wish to thank all contributors to this volume for their efforts and contributions to this volume. The editorial committee would like to thank all reviewers for their diligent assistance in reviewing all contributions.

The editorial committee would like to express our gratitude to our editorial assistant, Robert Steenkamp, for his diligent assistance during the production of this volume. We would also like to express our gratitude to the team of Pretoria University Law Press (PULP), and especially Lizette Hermann, for making this volume a reality.

 

Dr GP Stevens
Editor

Creative Commons License All the contents of this journal, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License