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Historia

versión On-line ISSN 2309-8392

Historia vol.54 no.1 Durban  2009

 

GANDHI AND INDIAN NATIONALISM IN SOUTH AFRICA

 

Renaissances, African and modern: Gandhi as a resource?

 

Die Renaissance'e van Afrika en die moderne : Gandhi as 'n hulpbron?

 

 

Crain Soudien

Crain Soudien is Professor in the School of Education at the University of Cape Town He is interested in the questions of race, class and gender and has published extensively in the fields of Sociology, Sociology of Education and Public History His most recent book is an edited collection with B Bennett and C Julius, City, Site, Museum, published by the District Six Museum, Cape Town

 

 


ABSTRACT

The purpose of this article is to understand the significance of Gandhi for the discussion about the African Renaissance. The article begins with the argument that the critical process of self-reflection begun in India about its past as a resource for imagining its future is central to any possibility of a renaissance in Africa. It draws on Gandhi in terms of what an examination of his central ideas might tell us about a future post-colonial Africa. Two of these ideas relate to the role of women in society and the attendant impact this view has on dominant masculinist tropes found in colonial historiography. Using these, the article looks at Gandhi not for the political and strategic choices he makes, but for understanding the kind of ethical identity or, the humanness which Gandhi's life represents.

Keywords: African historiography; African modernities; African politics; African Renaissance; African Studies; cultural studies; Gandhi and Africa; Gandhi and masculinity; post-colonialism; South-South relations


OPSOMMING

Die doel van hierdie artikel is om die betekenis van Gandhi vir die bespreking van die Afrika Renaissance te bepaal. Die artikel begin met die argument dat die kritiese proses van self-refleksie wat in Indië oor die land se verlede as 'n hulpbron vir die voorstelling van sy toekoms begin het, sentraal in die moontlikheid van enige Renaissance in Afrika staan. Dit fokus op Gandhi in terme van wat n ondersoek van sy kernidees ons van n toekomstige post-koloniale Afrika mag vertel. Twee van hierdie idees hou verband met die rol van vroue in die gemeenskap en die gevolglike impak wat hierdie mening op dominante manlike sinnebeelding in koloniale historiografie gevind het. Met die gebruik hiervan, bestudeer die artikel Gandhi, nie om die politieke en strategiese keuses wat hy gemaak het nie, maar ten einde die tipe etiese identiteit of menslikheid wat Gandhi se lewe verteenwoordig, te verstaan.

Sleutelwoorde: Afrika historiografie; Afrika moderniteite; Afrika politiek; Afrika Renaissance; Afrika Studies; Gandhi en Afrika; Gandhi en manlikheid; kulturele studies; post-kolonialisme; Suid-Suid verhoudings


 

 

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