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African Journal of Disability (Online)

On-line version ISSN 2226-7220
Print version ISSN 2223-9170

Abstract

QUARMBY, Candice A.  and  PILLAY, Mershen. The intersection of disability and food security: Perspectives of health and humanitarian aid workers. Afr. j. disabil. (Online) [online]. 2018, vol.7, pp.1-9. ISSN 2226-7220.  http://dx.doi.org/10.4102/ajod.v7i0.322.

BACKGROUND: Most people with disabilities the world over can be found in the Majority (or 'economically developing') World. This is also where most of the world's hungry and malnourished are found. We argue that the intersectionality between disability and nutrition may best be understood through a food security framework, and we position all people living with disability, including those experiencing feeding and swallowing disabilities, as at risk for food insecurity, especially those living in humanitarian emergency contextsOBJECTIVES: This study aimed to explore and describe the knowledge and experience of humanitarian aid workers (HAWs) and health care professionals (HCPs) in food assistance contexts with regard to the nutrition and food security of people living with disabilitiesMETHOD: In this exploratory, descriptive study, 16 participants with experience in sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Asia participated in an online survey. Three survey participants with extensive experience were also interviewed. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics and thematic content analysisRESULTS: Results revealed that participants had generally low levels of exposure to and experience with disability, including swallowing and feeding disordersCONCLUSIONS: Reduced knowledge of HAWs and HCPs regarding disability and the lack of professionals such as speech-language therapists, who manage disability-specific issues such as feeding and swallowing disorders, may affect the food security of people living with disabilities in food assistance contexts

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