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versão On-line ISSN 2223-6279
versão impressa ISSN 0379-8577


SPIES, Cynthia; SEALE, lelse  e  BOTMA, Yvonne. Adult learning: What nurse educators need to know about mature students. Curationis [online]. 2015, vol.38, n.2, pp.1-7. ISSN 2223-6279.

BACKGROUND: Most nurse educators regard students who enter postgraduate studies as adult learners capable of self-direction and independent learner behaviour. Therefore, a mismatch between the nurse educator's expectation of adult learners and actual adult learner conduct may result in disappointment and even frustration for both educator and learner PURPOSE: This article is a report of a secondary analysis of data that were collected to explore the high-fidelity simulation learning experiences of a group of postgraduate nursing students. The secondary analysis was done to determine whether adult learners who bring professional knowledge and experience to a postgraduate learning environment displayed adult learner conduct as proposed by educational theorist Malcolm Knowles METHOD: Using a qualitative descriptive research design, data were gathered from 18 postgraduate nursing students who participated in high-fidelity simulation in a nursing school at a higher education institution in South Africa. The nominal group technique was used to collect the students' ideas about improving their simulation learning experiences. A secondary qualitative analysis of the primary nominal group data was done FINDINGS: Data either confirmed or belied adult learner behaviour. Although the findings suggested self-directed and independent learner behaviour, they also revealed behaviour evident of dependence on the educator CONCLUSION: Mature students have well established ways of thinking and doing that may hinder learning. Educators have to support adult learners in developing effective learning techniques in order to maximise the benefits of their experience and knowledge by fostering independence and self-direction

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