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Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine

On-line version ISSN 2078-6751
Print version ISSN 1608-9693

Abstract

KING, Jeanmari  and  HAGEMEISTER, Dirk T.. Hepatitis B co-infection in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy at the TC Newman Anti Retroviral Treatment Clinic in Paarl, Western Cape. South. Afr. j. HIV med. (Online) [online]. 2016, vol.17, n.1, pp.1-3. ISSN 2078-6751.  http://dx.doi.org/10.4102/sajhivmed.v17i1.336.

BACKGROUND: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection in South Africa is estimated to be between 5% and 23%; however, only limited evidence is available. Co-infection increases the risk of chronification of HBV, liver cirrhosis and death. OBJECTIVE: To assess the HBV and/or HIV co-infection rate amongst the adult antiretroviral treatment cohort at the TC Newman ART Clinic in Paarl, Western Cape. METHODS: In a retrospective, cross-sectional study, the routine hepatitis B surface antigen screening results for all adult HIV patients who were started on antiretroviral treatment over a period of 19 months were collected and analysed for gender, CD4 count and age. RESULTS: Amongst the 498 participants (60% female participants), the Hepatitis B surface Antigen positivity rate was 7.6%. Male gender, age between 50 and 59 years and a low CD4 count were correlated with higher rates. CONCLUSION: Useful insight could be obtained by analysing routine data. The prevalence of almost 8% confirms the need for testing of HIV-positive patients for hepatitis B.

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