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Verbum et Ecclesia

On-line version ISSN 2074-7705
Print version ISSN 1609-9982

Abstract

SCOTT, Hilton R.; VAN WYK, Tanya  and  WEPENER, Cas. Prayer and being church in postapartheid, multicultural South Africa. Verbum Eccles. (Online) [online]. 2019, vol.40, n.1, pp.1-8. ISSN 2074-7705.  http://dx.doi.org/10.4102/ve.v40i1.1964.

The research presented in this article was conducted as a continuing concern over 'being church' in a multicultural urban setting in postapartheid South Africa. It has been nearly 30 years since the end of apartheid and South Africans are still learning to live together in unity, as the pioneers of democracy envisaged. In this contribution, it is suggested that in this context, prayer could be utilised as an instrument for church-praxis. This is done by taking an interdisciplinary approach, namely, integrating theories from the fields of practical theology and systematic theology with regard to liturgical studies and ecclesiology, and using them to interpret empirical data and to build on the process of liturgical inculturation. The concept of 'koinonia' is explored by reflecting on the relationship between inclusivity and exclusivity and integrating it with contemporary praxis theory from liturgical studies. This is aimed at promoting a manner of 'being church' that reflects Dirk Smit's aphorism, of lex orandi, lex credendi, lex (con)vivendi, that is, as we pray, so we believe, and so we live (together). INTRADISCIPLINARY AND/OR INTERDISCIPLINARY IMPLICATIONS: The research presented in this article was conducted as a continuing concern over 'being church' in a multicultural, urban setting in postapartheid South Africa. This is done by taking an interdisciplinary approach, integrating theories from the fields of practical theology and systematic theology with regard to liturgical studies and ecclesiology.

Keywords : liturgical inculturation; inclusivity; exclusivity; being church; prayer; liturgical rituals.

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