SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online

 
vol.18 número1Aftercare to chemically addicted adolescents: An exploration of their needsA randomised pilot study on the efficacy of milking cream and a homeopathic complex topical cream on Diaper Dermatitis índice de autoresíndice de materiabúsqueda de artículos
Home Pagelista alfabética de revistas  

Servicios Personalizados

Articulo

Indicadores

Links relacionados

  • En proceso de indezaciónCitado por Google
  • En proceso de indezaciónSimilares en Google

Compartir


Health SA Gesondheid (Online)

versión On-line ISSN 2071-9736
versión impresa ISSN 1025-9848

Resumen

YAKO, Elizabeth M.  y  NZAMA, Noreen P.B.. Maintenance of the selected infant feeding methods amongst postnatal mothers at risk of HIV in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Health SA Gesondheid (Online) [online]. 2013, vol.18, n.1, pp.1-7. ISSN 2071-9736.

The focus of this study was to explore and describe influences on decision making related to infant feeding methods in the context of HIV and AIDS. Study objectives were: (1) to explore and describe the influences on decision making related to infant feeding methods selected by the mother during the antenatal period and (2) to describe the reasons related to a change in infant feeding method in the postnatal period. This cross-sectional study used the quantitative approach and a descriptive design. A convenience sample of 60 mothers in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission programme participated in this study. Data were collected six weeks post-delivery and analysed using SPSS 17.0 software for Windows. The mean age of the mothers was 26.5 years, range 19 to 41 years (SD 5.3). At six weeks 73% (n = 44) of the mothers maintained the infant feeding method selected antenatally and 27% (n = 16) had changed methods. Using a Chi-square test, the difference between groups was significant ( [df 1] = 19, p < = 28) continued with the method selected antenatally, compared with 50% (n = 16) of all HIV-negative mothers (n = 32). The reasons for deciding to change methods included going back to school or work; illness of babies; painful breasts; and advice from significant others. Most mothers maintained the feeding methods selected antenatally. HIV-positive mothers were more likely to adhere to the initial decisions made antenatally than HIV-negative mothers.

        · resumen en Africano     · texto en Inglés     · Inglés ( pdf )

 

Creative Commons License Todo el contenido de esta revista, excepto dónde está identificado, está bajo una Licencia Creative Commons