SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online

vol.39 número1Development of the learning programme management and evaluation scale for the South African skills development contextWhen rendering hospitality becomes collateral damage: Psycho-organisational variables and job burnout amongst hotel workers in metropolitan Nigeria índice de autoresíndice de assuntospesquisa de artigos
Home Pagelista alfabética de periódicos  

Serviços Personalizados



Links relacionados

  • Em processo de indexaçãoCitado por Google
  • Em processo de indexaçãoSimilares em Google


SA Journal of Industrial Psychology

versão On-line ISSN 2071-0763
versão impressa ISSN 0258-5200


JOHNSTON, Claire S. et al. Sense of coherence and job characteristics in predicting burnout in a South African sample. SA j. ind. Psychol. [online]. 2013, vol.39, n.1, pp.1-9. ISSN 2071-0763.

ORIENTATION: Research that considers the effects of individual characteristics and job characteristics jointly in burnout is necessary, especially when one considers the possibility of curvilinear relationships between job characteristics and burnout. RESEARCH PURPOSE: This study examines the contribution of sense of coherence (SOC) and job characteristics to predicting burnout by considering direct and moderating effects. MOTIVATION FOR THIS STUDY: Understanding the relationships of individual and job characteristics with burnout is necessary for preventing burnout. It also informs the design of interventions. RESEARCH DESIGN, APPROACH AND METHOD: The participants were 632 working adults (57% female) in South Africa. The measures included the Job Content Questionnaire, the Sense of Coherence Questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. The authors analysed the data using hierarchical multiple regression with the enter method. MAIN FINDINGS: Job characteristics and SOC show the expected direct effects on burnout. SOC has a direct negative effect on burnout. Job demands and supervisor social support show nonlinear relationships with burnout. SOC moderates the effect of demands on burnout and has a protective function so that the demands-burnout relationship differs for those with high and low SOC. PRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: The types of effects, the shape of the stressor-strain relationship and the different contributions of individual and job characteristics have implications for designing interventions. CONTRIBUTION/VALUE ADD: SOC functions differently when combined with demands, control and support. These different effects suggest that it is not merely the presence or absence of a job characteristic that is important for well-being outcomes but how people respond to its presence or absence.

        · texto em Inglês     · Inglês ( pdf )


Creative Commons License Todo o conteúdo deste periódico, exceto onde está identificado, está licenciado sob uma Licença Creative Commons