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South African Journal of Child Health

On-line version ISSN 1999-7671
Print version ISSN 1994-3032

Abstract

ADEDINI, S A; AKINYEMI, J O  and  WANDERA, S O. Women's position in the household as a determinant of neonatal mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. S. Afr. j. child health [online]. 2019, vol.13, n.1, pp.17-22. ISSN 1999-7671.  http://dx.doi.org/10.7196/sajch.2019.v13i1.1531.

BACKGROUND: The burden of under-five mortality in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is highest during the neonatal period, with over 40% of cases occurring during the first month of life. There is a paucity of evidence on the influence of women's household position on neonatal survival in SSA OBJECTIVE: To assess the influence of women's household position on neonatal survival in SSA METHODS: We analysed pooled data (N=191 514) from the demographic and health surveys of 18 countries in SSA. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to explore statistically significant relationships RESULTS: Findings support the hypothesis that a low position of a woman in the household is significantly associated with high neonatal mortality, as children of women who experienced a high position in the household had a significantly lower risk of neonatal mortality (hazard ratio 0.85, confidence interval 0.76 - 0.95; p<0.05) than those whose mothers experienced a low household position CONCLUSION: This study concludes that improving women's household position through enhanced socioeconomic status could substantially contribute to reducing neonatal mortality in SSA

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