SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online

 
vol.10 issue4Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in children: The Lagos University Teaching Hospital experienceManagement of acute diarrhoeal disease at Edendale Hospital: Are standard treatment guidelines followed? author indexsubject indexarticles search
Home Pagealphabetic serial listing  

Services on Demand

Article

Indicators

Related links

  • On index processCited by Google
  • On index processSimilars in Google

Share


South African Journal of Child Health

On-line version ISSN 1999-7671
Print version ISSN 1994-3032

Abstract

SINGH, S  and  MADAREE, A. Omphalocoeles: A decade in review. S. Afr. j. child health [online]. 2016, vol.10, n.4, pp.211-214. ISSN 1999-7671.  http://dx.doi.org/10.7196/sajch.2016.v10i4.1149.

BACKGROUND. Omphalocoeles are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The presentation varies greatly and management options differ accordingly. Limited literature exists regarding the varied presentation, associated congenital abnormalities and survival from a South African, or even an African perspective. OBJECTIVE. To describe the presentation of omphalocoeles, associated abnormalities and survival rates. METHODS. A retrospective epidemiological chart review of patients referred to the paediatric surgical service with newly diagnosed omphalocoeles, between January 2002 and December 2012. Data retrieved included patient demographics, perinatal history, HIV status, associated abnormalities, size of the omphalocoele, management and outcome. RESULTS. One hundred and fifty-four patients were diagnosed with an omphalocoele during the study period. There were 117 (75.9%) associated congenital abnormalities, 64 (41.5%) minor omphalocoeles (defined as <5 cm) and 66 (42.8%) major omphalocoeles (defined as >5 cm). Eleven patients (7.1%) had ruptured omphalocoeles. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome was the most commonly associated abnormality (37.6%), followed by cardiac defects (34.4%). CONCLUSION. Omphalocoeles are associated with high numbers of congenital abnormalities. This further complicates management in a resource-poor environment. There is an increased association with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome compared with previous studies. This highlights the need to be vigilant with glucose monitoring and to prevent secondary, avoidable complications.

        · text in English     · English ( pdf )

 

Creative Commons License All the contents of this journal, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License