SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online

 
vol.9 número4Risser sign: trends in a South African populationAssessment of undergraduate orthopaedic training at medical schools in South Africa índice de autoresíndice de assuntospesquisa de artigos
Home Pagelista alfabética de periódicos  

Serviços Personalizados

Artigo

Indicadores

Links relacionados

  • Em processo de indexaçãoCitado por Google
  • Em processo de indexaçãoSimilares em Google

Compartilhar


SA Orthopaedic Journal

versão On-line ISSN 2309-8309

Resumo

BICK, Simon  e  DUNN, Robert. Occipito-cervical fusion: review of surgical indications, techniques and clinical outcomes. SA orthop. j. [online]. 2010, vol.9, n.4, pp. 26-32. ISSN 2309-8309.

STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective review of patients undergoing single-surgeon occipito-cervical fusion. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to evaluate the surgical indications, techniques and clinical outcomes of occipito-cervical fusion, including C2 fixation methods and complications. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Thirty-four consecutive patients (16 males, 18 females) who underwent occipito-cervical fusion were reviewed. The indications for fusion were instability due to inflammatory diseases (13), trauma (9), congenital abnormalities (9), infections (2) and tumours (1). Nine patients (all but 1 paediatric) underwent fusion with bone grafting and halo immobilisation. Twenty-five patients underwent posterior instrumented fusion. Halo removal was performed after 6 weeks and soft collars were worn for 6 weeks in the instrumented group. Surgical techniques and clinical outcomes (stability, fusion, complications) were reviewed. RESULTS: Clinical and radiological fusion was attained in all patients available for follow-up, with an average of 2.7 months in the uninstrumented group and 5.2 months in the instrumented group. All fusions resulted in resolution of preoperative pain and an improvement in pre-operative neurology. Two patients demised in the acute postoperative period as a result of the underlying pathology. Eighteen patients required simultaneous decompressions. No instrumentation failures occurred. Superficial wound sepsis occurred in 4 patients, one subsequently requiring instrumentation removal. CONCLUSION: Occipito-cervical fusion is a safe and reliable procedure, predictably providing stability and improvement in preoperative pain and neurology. Multiple cervical fixation options are available according to surgeon preference and anatomical variants.

        · texto em Inglês     · Inglês ( pdf )

 

Creative Commons License All the contents of this journal, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License