SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online

 
vol.40 suppl.1Servant leadership: A required leadership model for efficient and effective service delivery in a democratic South AfricaThe culturally gendered pastoral care model of women caring for refugee girls in a context of HIV/AIDS índice de autoresíndice de materiabúsqueda de artículos
Home Pagelista alfabética de revistas  

Servicios Personalizados

Articulo

Indicadores

Links relacionados

  • En proceso de indezaciónCitado por Google
  • En proceso de indezaciónSimilares en Google

Compartir


Studia Historiae Ecclesiasticae

versión On-line ISSN 2412-4265
versión impresa ISSN 1017-0499

Resumen

MUDIMELI, Lufuluvhi M  y  LANDMAN, Christina. The vhusadzi theology of ministry. Studia Hist. Ecc. [online]. 2014, vol.40, suppl.1, pp.269-283. ISSN 2412-4265.

Culture and religion have both a healthy and an unhealthy effect on the leadership development of women in Africa, in particular, the Vhavenda women. The position of women in the church today is influenced by perceptions which people hold, either from a religious or cultural perspective. Male dominated leadership in the church continues to remain unchallenged because the Bible is used to support and entrench the system of patriarchy. The reasons that are given to subordinate women in the church are not very different from those given in societies and structures outside the church - and these reasons are invariably based on culture and/or religion. The article describes the tenets of the vhusadzi theology as the basis of women's leadership roles in ministry. The article focuses on the deconstruction of cultural and religious discourses that hold the church and women captive in subordinate and non-leadership roles and the shifting of these discourses to healthy church practices and policies under the guidance of the vhusadzi theology.

        · texto en Inglés     · Inglés ( pdf )

 

Creative Commons License Todo el contenido de esta revista, excepto dónde está identificado, está bajo una Licencia Creative Commons