SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online

 
vol.47 issue6Effects of Prosopis laevigata pods on carcass characteristics, non-carcass components, meat quality, fatty acid profile and sensory attributesEffect of olive meal and supplemental enzymes on performance traits, blood biochemistry, humoral immunity response and caecal microbiota of broilers author indexsubject indexarticles search
Home Pagealphabetic serial listing  

Services on Demand

Article

Indicators

Related links

  • On index processCited by Google
  • On index processSimilars in Google

Share


South African Journal of Animal Science

On-line version ISSN 2221-4062
Print version ISSN 0375-1589

Abstract

POPHIWA, P.; WEBB, E.C.  and  FRYLINCK, L.. Carcass and meat quality of Boer and indigenous goats of South Africa under delayed chilling conditions. S. Afr. j. anim. sci. [online]. 2017, vol.47, n.6, pp.794-803. ISSN 2221-4062.  http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/sajas.v47i6.7.

This study was conducted to evaluate the carcass and meat quality of Boer goats and unimproved indigenous goats of South Africa, under delayed chilling conditions. Ten goats per breed were used for the study. The goats were slaughtered according to standard abattoir procedures. The dressed carcasses were held at 10-15 °C for 6 hours before chilling at 4 °C until 24 hours (delayed chilling). The pH/temperature values, instrumental colour (CIE L*, a*, b*, chroma and hue angle), surface myoglobin pigments (deoxyglobin, oxyglobin and metmyoglobin), water-holding capacity (WHC), thawing loss, cooking loss, sarcomere length, and Warner Bratzler shear force (WBSF) values were evaluated on samples of the m. longissimus dorsi (LD) and the m. semimembranosus (SM). Carcasses of Boer goats were heavier and had higher chilling loss than those of indigenous goats. There were no breed differences in dressing percentages, pH/temperature values or meat quality characteristics. Overall, the mean ultimate pH values (5.75-5.80), were marginally higher than the recommended pH for desirable eating quality. However, the mean L* (36.3-40.2), a* (18.0-18.8), WHC (0.35-0.39) and metmyoglobin (16.3-18.8%) values were within the range that is acceptable for normal meat. On average, LD samples were tender (WBSF values of 4.43 ± 0.40 kg), but SM samples were marginally tough (WBSF values of 8.45 ± 0.54 kg). This study shows that delayed chilling could be a useful strategy in improving the colour and tenderness of goat meat.

Keywords : Goat meat quality; meat colour; sarcomere length; tenderness.

        · text in English     · English ( pdf )

 

Creative Commons License All the contents of this journal, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License