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South African Journal of Animal Science

On-line version ISSN 2221-4062
Print version ISSN 0375-1589

Abstract

STEENHUISEN, E.  and  GOUS, R.M.. The response of broiler breeder hens to dietary balanced protein. S. Afr. j. anim. sci. [online]. 2016, vol.46, n.3, pp.269-277. ISSN 2221-4062.  http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/sajas.v46i3.6.

Two basal feeds (118 and 175 g protein/kg) with similar balanced amino acid mixtures were appropriately blended to produce six experimental diets differing in protein. These were fed for six weeks to 180 broiler breeder hens (Ross 308) housed in individual cages from 26 w of age. A 13 h photoperiod was applied. Half the birds were restricted to 160 g of feed/d, whilst the others were fed ad libitum. The treatments were randomly allocated within six blocks. At the end of the six-week period the mean voluntary intake of the ad libitum-fed birds was 169 g/d whereas the intake of hens on feed restriction was 155 g/d. In spite of the range of protein intakes from 18.5 and 28.8 g/bird, no differences were observed in rate of laying between the two feeding strategies or dietary protein levels, nor were there differences in the proportions of yolk or albumen between these treatments. Egg weight, egg output and weight gain increased with protein intake as did energy retention (kJ/d) whereas heat output (kJ/d) decreased as protein intake increased. Even though dietary protein intake had no effect on rate of lay, the resultant decrease in heat output at high protein intakes suggests that this might be a useful strategy to consider for overcoming mild heat stress.

Keywords : Ad libitum feeding; heat production; energy retention; egg composition.

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