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vol.69 número1Cui narro haec? Augustine and his Manichaean audience: A re-reading of the first three books of the ConfessionsBiblical quotations in Faustus's Capitula índice de autoresíndice de materiabúsqueda de artículos
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HTS Theological Studies

versión On-line ISSN 2072-8050

Resumen

PEDERSEN, Nils A.. Manichaean exonyms and autonyms (including Augustine's writings). Herv. teol. stud. [online]. 2013, vol.69, n.1, pp. 1-7. ISSN 2072-8050.

Did the Western Manichaeans call themselves 'Manichaean' and 'Christian'? A survey of the evidence, primarily Latin and Coptic, seems to show that the noun and adjective uses of 'Manichaean' were very rarely used and only in communication with non-Manichaeans. The use of 'Christian' is central in the Latin texts, which, however, is not written for internal use, but with a view to outsiders. The Coptic texts, on the other hand, are written for an internal audience; the word 'Christian' is only found twice and in fragmentary contexts, but it is suggested that some texts advocate a Christian self-understanding (Mani's Epistles, the Psalm-Book) whilst others (the Kephalaia) are striving to establish an independent identity. Hence, the Christian self-understanding may reflect both the earliest Manichaeism and its later Western form whilst the attempt to be independent may be a secondary development.

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