SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online

 
vol.111 número8The HIV cascade of care among serodiscordant couples in four high HIV prevalence settings in sub-Saharan AfricaExpanding the epidemiological understanding of hepatitis C in South Africa: Perspectives from a patient cohort in a rural town índice de autoresíndice de assuntospesquisa de artigos
Home Pagelista alfabética de periódicos  

Serviços Personalizados

Artigo

Indicadores

Links relacionados

  • Em processo de indexaçãoCitado por Google
  • Em processo de indexaçãoSimilares em Google

Compartilhar


SAMJ: South African Medical Journal

versão On-line ISSN 2078-5135
versão impressa ISSN 0256-9574

Resumo

NKOSI, B E  e  SIBANDA, S. Evaluating an antimicrobial stewardship programme implemented in an intensive care unit of a large academic hospital, using the RE-AIM framework. SAMJ, S. Afr. med. j. [online]. 2021, vol.111, n.8, pp.777-782. ISSN 2078-5135.  http://dx.doi.org/10.7196/samj.2021.v111i8.15363.

BACKGROUND: The threat of antimicrobial resistance driven by inappropriate and unnecessary use of antimicrobials is a global issue of great concern. Evidence-based approaches to optimising antimicrobial prescribing to improve patient care while reducing the rate of antimicrobial resistance continue to be implemented worldwide. However, the successes or failures of implementation of such approaches are seldom evaluatedOBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of an implemented antimicrobial stewardship programme (ASP) in reducing the spread of antimicrobial resistance in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a large academic hospital using the RE-AIM frameworkMETHODS: A descriptive quasi-experimental study was conducted with adult patients who had been admitted to the ICU of an academic hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa. Data were extracted from patients' records using a structured questionnaire. Descriptive statistics of four RE-AIM dimensions (reach, effectiveness, adoption and implementation) and the overall impact of the implemented antimicrobial stewardship programme were calculatedRESULTS: From the 59 participant records, 21 patients (35.6%) developed hospital-acquired infections and all were prescribed antimicrobials during their stay in the ICU. Twenty-seven pathogens (bacterial species) were isolated from samples acquired from the patients, including Staphylococcus aureus (n=6; 22.2%), Escherichia coli (n=4; 14.8%), Acinetobacter baumannii (n=4; 14.8%) and Streptococcus pnuemoniae (n=3; 11.11%), as well as 10 other bacterial species (37.0%) including Corynebacterium species, Enterococcus faecium, Haemophilus influenzae, Klebsiella species, Clostridium difficile and Salmonella species. Of the 27 pathogens isolated, 19 (70.4 %) were resistant to the prescribed antimicrobials. The overall impact of the ASP implemented in the studied facility was 67.2%CONCLUSIONS: An ASP requires both thorough implementation and leadership support to have an impact in the reduction of antimicrobial resistance. Lack of leadership support poses a significant challenge to sustainability. There is an urgent need for behavioural change in hospital leadership

        · texto em Inglês     · Inglês ( pdf )

 

Creative Commons License Todo o conteúdo deste periódico, exceto onde está identificado, está licenciado sob uma Licença Creative Commons