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SAMJ: South African Medical Journal

Print version ISSN 0256-9574

Abstract

HABTE, T M; DUBE, S; ISMAIL, N  and  HOOSEN, A A. Hospital and community isolates of uropathogens at a tertiary hospital in South Africa. SAMJ, S. Afr. med. j. [online]. 2009, vol.99, n.8, pp. 584-587. ISSN 0256-9574.

AIM: To investigate the profile of common uropathogens isolated from urine specimens submitted to the diagnostic microbiology laboratory at a tertiary teaching hospital and assess their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns to commonly used antimicrobial agents. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of laboratory reports for all urine specimens submitted for investigations over a 1-year period. Isolates were tested by means of the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method for susceptibility to amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, co-trimoxazole and nitrofurantoin, and for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) production. RESULTS: Out of the total specimens (N=2 203) received over the 1-year study period, 51.1% (1 126) of the urine samples were culture-positive, the majority (65.4%) having come from females. The most common isolate was Escherichia coli (39.0%) followed by Klebsiella species (20.8%) and Enterococcus faecalis (8.2%). The Gram-negative isolates displayed a very high level of resistance to amoxicillin (range 43 - 100%) and co-trimoxazole (range 29 - 90%), whereas resistance to gentamicin (range 0 - 50%) and ciprofloxacin (range 0 - 33%) was lower. E. coli isolates were susceptible to nitrofurantoin (94%), and ESBL production was significantly higher (p=0.01) in the hospital isolates, compared with those from the community referral sites. CONCLUSIONS: The culture-positive rate for uropathogens was high, with a greater incidence among females. E. coli was the most common aetiological agent identified, and remained susceptible to nitrofurantoin. Resistance levels to amoxicillin and co-trimoxazole were very high for all Gram-negative isolates, and it is recommended that these antibiotics should not be used for the empiric treatment of urinary tract infections.

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