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vol.99 número5Mental health service use among South Africans for mood, anxiety and substance use disorders índice de autoresíndice de materiabúsqueda de artículos
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SAMJ: South African Medical Journal

versión On-line ISSN 2078-5135
versión impresa ISSN 0256-9574

Resumen

HERMAN, Allen A et al. The South African Stress and Health (SASH) study: 12-month and lifetime prevalence of common mental disorders. SAMJ, S. Afr. med. j. [online]. 2009, vol.99, n.5, pp.339-344. ISSN 2078-5135.

BACKGROUND: The South African Stress and Health (SASH) study is the first large-scale population-based study of common mental disorders in the country. This paper provides data on the 12-month and lifetime prevalence of these conditions. METHODS: Data from a nationally representative sample of 4 351 adults were analysed. Mental disorders were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). An extensive survey questionnaire detailed contextual and socio-demographic factors, onset and course of mental disorders, and risk factors. Simple weighted cross-tabulation methods were used to estimate prevalence, and logistic regression analysis was used to study correlates of 12-month and lifetime prevalence. RESULTS: The lifetime prevalence for any disorder was 30.3%, and the most prevalent 12-month and lifetime disorders were the anxiety disorders. The Western Cape had the highest 12-month and lifetime prevalence rates, and the lowest rates were in the Northern Cape. CONCLUSIONS: The SASH study shows relatively high 12-month and lifetime prevalence rates. These findings have significant implications for planning mental health services.

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