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South African Journal of Science

versión On-line ISSN 1996-7489
versión impresa ISSN 0038-2353

Resumen

PETKOVA, Magdelena S. et al. Nurses' knowledge of and willingness to promote female condom use in Johannesburg Health District. S. Afr. j. sci. [online]. 2018, vol.114, n.7-8, pp.41-47. ISSN 1996-7489.  http://dx.doi.org/10.17159/sajs.2018/20170174.

The female condom is the only current method for female partners to simultaneously prevent both pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. Studies of various contraceptive methods suggest that providers' acceptance and endorsement may be a key factor in their clients' uptake and continued use of a method. Our aim in this study was to assess the relationship between nurses' knowledge of and their willingness to promote female condom use in 18 public healthcare facilities within the Johannesburg District. The mean score of correct answers of 398 nurses completing an anonymous, self-administered, six-item questionnaire was 4 out of a maximum of 6. Data analysis included the use of descriptive statistics and a chi-square test. It was found that 79% of participants were knowledgeable but only 59% were willing to promote female condom use. There was no association between knowledge of and willingness to promote female condom use. The following significant associations with knowledge and willingness to promote female condom use were found: family planning experience, being employed by a local government authority, working in a primary care clinic and having had informal training on female condom use. Informal training of nurses within the family planning unit in the clinics has the potential to improve nurses' knowledge and willingness to promote female condom use. SIGNIFICANCE: •This is the first study conducted in South Africa on the knowledge of and willingness of healthcare providers to promote female condom use. •An effective strategy is needed to motivate healthcare workers to promote female condom use with their patients. •Informal training of nurses within the family planning unit has the potential to improve nurses' knowledge of and willingness to promote female condom use.

Palabras clave : health professional; prevention; women; cognition; compliance.

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