SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online

 
vol.80 issue1Spatial variation of epoxyscillirosidine concentrations in Moraea pallida (yellow tulp) in South AfricaHistomorphometrical and ultrastructural study of the effects of carbendazim on the magnum of the Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) author indexsubject indexarticles search
Home Pagealphabetic serial listing  

Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research

On-line version ISSN 2219-0635

Abstract

MASANGANISE, Kaurai E; MATOPE, Gift  and  PFUKENYI, Davies M. A survey on auditing, quality assurance systems and legal frameworks in five selected slaughterhouses in Bulawayo, south-western Zimbabwe. Onderstepoort j. vet. res. [online]. 2013, vol.80, n.1, pp. 01-08. ISSN 2219-0635.

The purpose of this study was to explore the audits, quality assurance (QA) programmes and legal frameworks used in selected abattoirs in Zimbabwe and slaughterhouse workers' perceptions on their effectiveness. Data on slaughterhouse workers was gathered through a self-completed questionnaire and additional information was obtained from slaughterhouse and government records. External auditing was conducted mainly by the Department of Veterinary Public Health with little contribution from third parties. Internal auditing was restricted to export abattoirs. The checklist used on auditing lacked objective assessment criteria and respondents cited several faults in the current audit system. Most respondents (> 50.0%) knew the purposes and benefits of audit and QA inspections. All export abattoirs had QA programmes such as hazard analysis critical control point and ISO 9001 (a standard used to certify businesses' quality management systems) but their implementation varied from minimal to nil. The main regulatory defect observed was lack of requirements for a QA programme. Audit and quality assurance communications to the selected abattoirs revealed a variety of non-compliances with most respondents revealing that corrective actions to audit (84.3%) and quality assurance (92.3%) shortfalls were not done. A high percentage of respondents indicated that training on quality (76.8%) and regulations (69.8%) was critical. Thus, it is imperative that these abattoirs develop a food safety management system comprising of QA programmes, a microbial assessment scheme, regulatory compliance, standard operating procedures, internal and external auditing and training of workers.

        · text in English     · English ( pdf )

 

Creative Commons License All the contents of this journal, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License