Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Acta Academica]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2415-047920210001&lang=es vol. 53 num. 1 lang. es <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>An ordeal of the Real: shame and the superego</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2415-04792021000100001&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This essay argues that the renovation of a discourse of shame in late capitalist society requires revisiting the conventional Freudian literature on shame from a Lacanian point of view. The argument holds that shame is a subjective manifestation of a complex dialectics between the ego-ideal and the superego. The essay extends the Lacanian notion that shame is felt in relation to an "Other prior to the Other". Under the dialectical pressure of the ego-ideal, the superego, it is argued, plays a paradoxical but ineliminable role in the production of shame. In the concluding parts of the essay, I tease out the radical socio-political consequences of a renovated Lacanian discourse of shame. Correlated to the death drive, shame offers an escape from the capitalist symbolic order's predeterminations and pre-assigned identifications. As such, shame is designated not only as the telos of psychoanalysis, but also as the original and originary ethical relation. <![CDATA[<b>The Libeskind Jewish Museum in Berlin, the unpresentable and experience</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2415-04792021000100002&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This paper is an attempt to interpret the design or spatial modulation of an important work of architecture in Berlin, Germany, namely Daniel Libeskind's Jewish Museum. This is done by activating the heuristic potential of a number of relevant concepts from a variety of thinkers. After a brief introduction on modern architecture in Berlin, the focus shifts to this specific building, which is briefly described before interpretively introducing the notions of the 'real' in the work of Jacques Lacan - which denotes that which surpasses symbolisation, and is encountered in traumatic experiences - and correlatively, of 'earth' in that of Heidegger, which suggests something that only manifests itself in so far as it withdraws from scrutiny. The hermeneutic significance of these concepts for the Jewish Museum is explored, followed by a similar examination of the interpretive relevance of the notions of the 'unpresentable', 'unsayable' and sublime (Lyotard, Kant) for Libeskind's building. Given the enormity and unpresentable horror of the event (the Holocaust) indexed by the Jewish Museum, any analysis of the meaning of this building would be incomplete without focusing specifically on the experience(s) afforded to visitors. In this regard the work of Arleen lonescu on the Jewish Museum - on the significance of its 'voids', for example - and the (written) work of Libeskind himself (on the relevance of light, for instance) prove to be invaluable. Finally, Karsten Harries's insights concerning the 'ethical function of architecture', 'a sense of place' and 'community' are employed to draw together the strands of the present interpretive essay. <![CDATA[<b>Surveillance capitalism as white world-making</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2415-04792021000100003&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The era of 'surveillance capitalism' as a new logic of accumulation that claims human experience as free raw material necessitates an understanding of how corporate-controlled digital communication technologies govern and structure how we come to know the world. This article investigates surveillance capitalist operations and argues that it enables (l) algorithmic colonisation, (2) oppressive digital practices that reify bias along racial lines, and (3) the turning of bodies into objects in the creation and maintenance of whiteness. Through presenting these different arguments, a larger point emerges, namely, that surveillance capitalist operations must be understood as intimately tied to the project of white world-making. <![CDATA[<b>Postures of protest: The reinterpretation of FAK folk songs as expressions of (a new) nationalism and nostalgia</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2415-04792021000100004&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es In post-apartheid South Africa, as part of deep-rooted socio-political and cultural disputes, Afrikaner ethnic anxiety is pervasive, while marginal and liminal experiences of being white and Afrikaans bring to the fore both self-protective positions of whiteness, and those that strive to undo regressive ideas of white power. Even before the demise of apartheid, Afrikaans alternative music has voiced dissenting positions that confront questions of race, ethnicity, and power. In this article 'recycled' FAK songs are analysed by way of Postural Theory, a theoretical framework developed by the South African philosopher Johann Visagie. Complemented by relevant perspectives relating to an understanding of opposing dislocated apartheid and post-apartheid senses of self, our examination of the deeper strata of the songs highlights postures of (morally and ethically) taking care, either of the self or the other - but also postures of meaninglessness and suffering, pointing to loss as a central aspect of the 'threatened identity'. <![CDATA[<b>The creative practitioner in South African higher education: Practice and scholarship in conversation and flux</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2415-04792021000100005&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article examines the position of creative practitioners working in South African tertiary education, with specific focus on the scope and impact of the 2017 Policy on the Evaluation of Creative Outputs and Innovations produced by South African Public Higher Education Institutions. I argue that, although the policy is a welcome development, several fundamental issues related to creative work, definitions of knowledge, differences between 'pure practice', artistic research and academic research and the position of creative work in the knowledge economy are not adequately addressed in the policy. Furthermore there are several instances, I argue, where the policy exposes biases towards certain disciplines and sub-disciplines, and shows a significant lack of consistency in terms of the evaluation of outputs in different fields. I probe the question of whether creative and academic work should be considered as equally valuable within academe, and if so, what the implications of such a position could be for creative practitioners working in South African tertiary education. <![CDATA[<b>Being and becoming African as a permanent work in progress: inspiration from Chinua Achebe's proverbs</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2415-04792021000100006&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article examines the position of creative practitioners working in South African tertiary education, with specific focus on the scope and impact of the 2017 Policy on the Evaluation of Creative Outputs and Innovations produced by South African Public Higher Education Institutions. I argue that, although the policy is a welcome development, several fundamental issues related to creative work, definitions of knowledge, differences between 'pure practice', artistic research and academic research and the position of creative work in the knowledge economy are not adequately addressed in the policy. Furthermore there are several instances, I argue, where the policy exposes biases towards certain disciplines and sub-disciplines, and shows a significant lack of consistency in terms of the evaluation of outputs in different fields. I probe the question of whether creative and academic work should be considered as equally valuable within academe, and if so, what the implications of such a position could be for creative practitioners working in South African tertiary education. <![CDATA[<b>Author interview and book review: <i>Why nothing seems to matter any more, </i>by Bert Olivier</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2415-04792021000100007&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article examines the position of creative practitioners working in South African tertiary education, with specific focus on the scope and impact of the 2017 Policy on the Evaluation of Creative Outputs and Innovations produced by South African Public Higher Education Institutions. I argue that, although the policy is a welcome development, several fundamental issues related to creative work, definitions of knowledge, differences between 'pure practice', artistic research and academic research and the position of creative work in the knowledge economy are not adequately addressed in the policy. Furthermore there are several instances, I argue, where the policy exposes biases towards certain disciplines and sub-disciplines, and shows a significant lack of consistency in terms of the evaluation of outputs in different fields. I probe the question of whether creative and academic work should be considered as equally valuable within academe, and if so, what the implications of such a position could be for creative practitioners working in South African tertiary education.