Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Stellenbosch Theological Journal]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2413-946720170001&lang=en vol. 3 num. 1 lang. en <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Editorial</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100001&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en <![CDATA[<b>Voorwoord</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100002&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en <![CDATA[<b>The sacralisation of popular culture as adolescent lived spirituality</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100003&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Many adolescents are drawn to the fantasy, science fiction and urban fantasy genres (movies and books), genres whose main characters include witches, wizards, vampires, ghosts, angels, demons, aliens and various other supernatural beings and events. Books and movies such as The Hobbit, Lord of the Rings (film series), Harry Potter (film series), X-Files, Twilight (film series), Star Wars (film series), and so on, are not only fervently consumed by some adolescents but have also, in some instances, been sacralised by adolescents (see Hopper 2005:116, McAvan 2012:5-10, Kirby 2013:2). In this article it will be argued that the reason for this, is that adolescents while questioning their identities and exploring their spiritualties, need a 'safe spiritual space' for this journey, one which may be related as something akin to what Berger termed the 'sacred canopy' where order can keep chaos at bay (Berger 1967: 51). This article will build on a lived theology perspective of how the divine can be experienced in the sources offered by popular culture texts that may become a 'sacred canopy' under which the adolescents can express their spiritual journeys. This article hopes to contribute to the facilitation of more conversations taking place amongst parents, pastors and teachers on the importance of allowing adolescents more freedom in what movies and books they are allowed to see and read. These conversations may also be employed by pastors, parents and teachers as conversation openers with adolescents who are often reluctant to open up about topics that they find difficult to discuss. Osmer and Salazar-Newton (2014:70) encourage the church to 'think of ways it can take advantage of the interest of children and youth in fantasy literature,' on their spiritual life journeys. <![CDATA[<b>The political responsibility of the Protestant churches in Brazil: A post-coup d'état approach towards the 500<sup>th</sup> anniversary of the Reformation</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100004&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article grapples with the actual political context internationally, focusing on the Brazilian Coup d'état more specifically. It reflects on the responsibility of the Protestant churches in this watershed experience of the celebration of the five hundredth anniversary of the Reformation that happens during a time of crisis. It suggests an apocalyptic approach for theology towards the radical transformation of society, regarding especially the actual crisis of financial Capitalism. It starts from the contextual analyses of Protestantism in Brazilian society, historically and contemporarily. It then reflects on the actual challenges of protestant churches in such a context and suggests some theological assertions towards an apocalyptical theology for the end of Capitalism. <![CDATA[<b>Mentoring and the ministerial formation of seminary students</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100005&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en In this article I shall look at the role of mentoring and its relational nature in the ministerial formation of seminary students. Incorporating the relational nature of mentoring in ministerial formation it facilitates the integration of seminary students' classroom experiences and their intellectual imaginations into practical ministerial skills in both the church and community. It is argued that embracing the relational nature of mentoring for ministerial formation in theological seminaries will help seminary students develop an awareness of the knowledge, skills and attitudes required for effective practical ministry. It will further help them develop an appreciation for their unique calling, gifting and skills. This article thus looks into how the relational nature of mentoring can foster the ministerial formation of seminary students. <![CDATA[<b>The boundaries of <i>transitional justice </i>Jean Améry and Johan Degenaar on the tension between survival and justice</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100006&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en What can political philosophy, interested in the field of 'transitional justice' learn from dissident voices in states who try to define their future while dealing with a past where human rights were severely violated? In this article I discuss Jean Améry's reflections on Germany's handling of their national socialistic past and compare that with texts of the South African philosopher Johan Degenaar. My premise will be that with regard to a central point, Améry and Degenaar's reflections on their nations' respective political choices display a strong resemblance: both resisted the notion of the priority of the (quasi-) natural survival of the nation over the sake of justice. But I will indicate also that the resistance of Améry and Degenaar was partly in vain: mainly, survival triumphed over justice in both cases. This indicates the lasting meaning of 'anamnestic reason', a conscious, critical remembrance of the past. <![CDATA[<b>Responding to the challenge of father absence and fatherlessness in the South African context: A case study involving concerned fathers from the North West Province</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100007&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article is about the challenge of father absence and fatherlessness in the South African context, and the involving of concerned fathers. To address this challenge, an intervention was crucial as well as the training and equipping of fathers. This intervention consists of different fathers from the North West Province who responded to the challenge of father absence and fatherlessness after workshops presented in a narrative form. The workshops were based on research on fatherhood as this is conceptualized from a Biblical perspective. The research1 is necessary because South Africa experiences a challenge of absent fathers and fatherlessness. This research2 showed that the greatest problem with regard to fatherhood is centred on a man's failure to resolve an identity crisis in the 21st century, but men are generally afraid to admit it. This problem has consequences for families and communities. Furthermore, this article reports on the responses and feedback of fathers and the supporting of literature in the research. <![CDATA[<b>The continuity of indigenous rituals in African ecclesiology: A Kenyan experience from a historical perspective</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The article sets out to unveil the problem: Is there any effective continuity of indigenous rituals in African ecclesiology? In other words, has the faith of the church in African Christianity given room to some African rituals that are visible in the contemporary theo-doctrinal discourses? The article is theoretically informed by Samuel Kibicho's (1932-2011) supposition on 'radical continuity' in African religion into and through the Christian message. For him thus, this 'radical continuity' should be the starting point for African theology and African Christianity for that matter. In his view, African ecclesiology requires a 'radical reinterpretation' of the Christian concept of revelation, salvation, evangelization, Christ and religious rituals. While Kibicho approached African indigenous rituals from a theo-philosophical perspective, this article approaches the subject from an oral historical perspective. In its methodology, the article relies heavily on oral sources, interviews, and participant observation. <![CDATA[<b>Karl Barth's interpretative construal of the anhypostasis and enhypostasis of Christ's human nature in relation to historical Protestant Orthodoxy</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100009&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en While it is generally agreed that the anhypostasis and enhypostasis of Christ's human nature have a place in Karl Barth's Christology, there is little agreement over Barth's interpretative construal of these concepts, particularly in relation to historical Protestant Orthodoxy. In this article I argue that Karl Barth adopts both anhypostasis and enhypostasis as a dual formula to explain how the human nature of Christ exists in union with the Logos. In this way Barth moves beyond Protestant orthodox tradition wherein the patristic Fathers, Lutheran and Reformed Scholastics, and the post-Scholastic dogmatics of Heinrich Schmid (Lutheran) and Heinrich Heppe (Reformed) consistently interpret anhypostasis and enhypostasis as autonomous concepts to explain how the human nature of Christ exists in union with the Logos. What Protestant orthodoxy understood as mutually exclusive concepts to explain the human nature of Christ, Karl Barth uniquely adopts as an ontological formula to explain how the human nature of Christ exists in union with the Logos. <![CDATA[<b>The progressive Pentecostal conception of development within an African context of poverty</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100010&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article, as literary study, is placed within the framework of a qualitative content analysis and deductive approach. It seeks to explore the progressive Pentecostal conception of development in a sub-Saharan African context of poverty. This investigation is based on ethnographic studies conducted in different parts of Africa. The study also aims to analyse the notion of evil spirits' work in relation to poverty and underdevelopment. These notions are raised by the new conception of development. It is argued that Western development theories implemented in Africa failed miserably to clarify the problem of poverty and underdevelopment. In the midst of crises and despair, a new trend of Pentecostalism emerged that promotes a completely new conception of development, which has a spiritual focus. The latter resonates strongly with the African worldview, reflects the biblical truth, and demonstrates that the ultimate cause of poverty is fundamentally spiritual, which implies the solution should be similar. Therefore, recent studies reveal that the movement has had more success in addressing poverty than the strategies of NGOs. However, this success is limited to an individual level. This means the structural problem responsible for the impoverishment of the masses in Africa is not dealt with directly. In this regard, an all-inclusive focus is needed that could pave the way to sustainable social and economic change in Africa. <![CDATA[<b>Discipleship understandings and misunderstandings in Mark 10:35-42. A reader response criticism</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100011&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article is a social scientific reading of James and John's request for seats of honour in Mark 10:35-42. It argues that when James and John made such a request they misunderstood the meaning of discipleship. The argument is established by looking at the literature review on Mark 10:35-42. Discipleship as presented in Mark is described to understand the type of discipleship demanded by Jesus. The discipleship misconceptions are also outlined in detail. The purpose here is to demonstrate that the disciples of Jesus, James and John, in Mark 10:35-42 misunderstood the meaning of discipleship as presented in Mark. The article makes a contribution to the ongoing research on New Testament scholarship by studying Mark 10:35-42 through a social scientific criticism. <![CDATA[<b>How environmental stewardship is viewed and evidenced in the Uniting Reformed Church of Southern Africa</b><b>: </b><b>An appraisal of students', lecturers' and ministers' perceptions</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100012&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en To care for the environment as part of a Christian believer's Christian stewardship duty is biblically founded. The Church is consequently well-positioned to make a significant contribution in addressing the environmental crisis by developing, preaching and practising a holistic spirituality that promotes a custodial ethic towards the natural world. The research report discusses how seminary students, lecturers and practicing ministers in the Uniting Reformed Church of Southern Africa perceive and practise this custodial ethic as environmental stewardship. There is consensus amongst respondents that Christian stewardship and environmental stewardship are biblically mandated and should be addressed and practised in the Church. However, the findings provided evidence that the realisation of environmental stewardship is tentative, both within the ministry and within seminary programmes. It is concluded that the teaching and practice of environmental stewardship is generally neglected in the Church. Areas for improvement in the ministry and seminary training curricula to support environmental stewardship are suggested. <![CDATA[<b>'Glocal' and integrated churches within a practical theological imagination of 'home away from home'</b>: <b>towards a ministry of migrants and refugees in diaspora</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100013&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Migration has become a major global challenge in recent years. Host countries' responses to migrants are varied - some accommodate and integrate migrants, others are apathetic, and migrants face exclusion and violent rejection. This suggests that host countries have developed mechanisms to cope with the challenges posed by migrants. Migrants have also developed systems to mitigate the impact of the challenges they encounter, such as the establishment of churches in their host countries. These churches may be referred to as 'glocal churches'. In view of this, this article considers a practical theological imagination of 'home away from home' as a migrant-theological and ministry-informing approach and draws on the theological notion that all humans are foreigners (or migrants - homo viator) in whichever life spaces they exist. This study argues that this approach provides a crucial nexus and challenge for church ministry integration in contexts of migration and challenges countries to be hospitable based on Imago Dei (theology) and human dignity (human rights) principles. It is argued that maintained Imago Dei and human dignity provide a critical link between churches and a nation. Furthermore, the notions of 'inclusiveness' for host people and 'home away from final eschatological home' for migrants provide a practical theological imagination that challenge a host country's citizens to positively consider migrants and migrants to avoid self-exclusion practices and establish integrated churches and communities. <![CDATA[<b>Die stil stem van die vroue in die vroeë sendingwerk van <i>der Kaapsche Kerk</i> in Njassaland (1896-1906) Deel I: Uitstuur- of opleidingskonteks</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100014&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Although by 1910 half of the staff of the "Kaapsche Kerk" in Nyasaland was female, their stories have scarcely been told. To give these women a voice, the author utilises two main sources: the newly retrieved personal diaries of Reverend Andrew George Murray² who arrived in 1901 in Nyasaland. Albeit written from a male perspective, the detailed diary-descriptions of the missionary work give an interesting depiction of the role and contribution of the female missionaries. This source is substantiated by the letters of Bessie Horne, who married eerwaarde TCB Vlok in May 1894, travelled to and lived with him at Livlezi until her death in April 1896. Her letters3 reflect her ruminations during those few fever-ridden months. Corroborated by speeches, papers, letters, and "witnesses" written by various educators and female missionaries at the time,4 the story of preparation, hardship and challenge, barrenness and "wildness", unfolds. <![CDATA[<b>Re-enactment leading to transformation: A critical assessment of the distinctives of Pentecostal preaching</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100015&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The article aims to define what the most distinctive characteristics of Pentecostal preaching are in order to assess these elements critically. Pentecostal preachers argue that their message is concerned with the Bible as the Word of God and its explication for modern-day listeners, but with the explicit purpose to perpetuate what the Bible says about the revelation of God as revealed to the contemporary preacher. The purpose of preaching is in other words that believers will experience an encounter with the same Spirit who revealed God to people in biblical times in order that present-day people will be saved, freed, healed and delivered in the same way as in apostolic times. Pentecostal preaching is described in terms of three elements, God's work in preaching, preparation for preaching, and the preaching event. The several aspects are described and discussed and some of the conclusions are that Pentecostal preaching should as non-negotiable be rooted soundly in Scripture, beginning from and focusing on the biblical text, while at the same time exegesis, although necessary academic work, may not be allowed to minimize the influence of the Spirit because the end of preaching is a word from God that produces the divine desired effect in the human situation. However, the emphasis on supernatural results leads in some instances to the manipulation of the context of preaching in order to gain the desired results, using emotionalism, mass suggestion, disorder, or showmanship. <![CDATA[<b>Preaching and performance: Theo-dramatic paradoxes in a South African sermon</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100016&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Preaching and performance is a relatively recent development in homiletical discourses and preaching practices. There is much promise in approaching preaching in this creative way. Attention will be paid to different promises related to this homiletical approach. In a next round of reflection the attention shifts to the way in which a specific approach to performance, also known as theo-drama, can not only enhance the preaching act, but also helps to understand the paradoxical role of the preacher, the audience and even God in the preaching event. This will be illustrated by looking at one of the sermons of John de Gruchy, which he preached in a very specific time in the history of South Africa. Attention will also be given to the way in which he performed a prophetic and therefore paradoxical role in his opposition to the apartheid government. <![CDATA[<b>A shy hope in the heart? Religious journalism in Australia and the Kuyperian legacy</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100017&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article explores points of contact between Abraham Kuyper's legacy in the field of religious journalism and the Centre for Public Christianity, an independent media company at the forefront of Australian religious journalism. While the cultural, political, and religious setting of twenty-first century Australia could not be further removed from that of late nineteenth century Netherlands, these two approaches to religious journalism hold much potential for mutual resourcement. The points of contact identified indicate the possibility that Kuyperian principle holds considerable explanatory power for the praxis of the Centre for Public Christianity, just as the praxis of the Centre for Public Christianity exposes underdeveloped elements of Kuyperian principle. <![CDATA[<b>A case for consonance between science and theology: The cosmological Christ as the scriptural and confessional focal point for dialogue</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100018&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The purpose of this article is to prove through theological reasoning why consonance between the sciences is biblically, as well as confessional sound. The substance for the argument is found in the Biblical confessions regarding Christ, as well as God's Trinitarian agency in the cosmos. The insight that Christ is God incarnated, the King, Creator and Redeemer of the entire cosmos, have important implications for the current dialogue between the sciences. An analysis of the relevant texts and historical confessions should prove that nothing in creation, including scientific endeavour, could be excluded from Christ's interaction with creation. The Cosmological Christ is the Scriptural and confessional focal point for dialogue and consonance between the sciences. <![CDATA[<b>The spiritual character of church discipline</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100019&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article focuses on the meaning of the words "the spiritual character of church discipline" used in the Church Order of Dordrecht in 1619 and since then in the church orders of churches with an affinity for the Church Order of Dordt. The conclusion is that the aim, way of implementation and climate of church discipline combined with other considerations in reformed church government all help to clarify the spiritual character of church discipline. At the basis of it the spiritual character of this kind of discipline is determined by the spiritual discipline of the Word and Spirit of God. In this regard inner convictions and not physical force or a technical application of church order measures must determine the acts of church discipline. Steps which should also be spiritual in nature. Church discipline should be in obedience to the Head of the church, Jesus Christ. He governs the church through His Word. <![CDATA[<b>'Off with their heads!' The imagery of the head in the trilogy of Psalms 108-110 (Part 1)</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100020&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en A social-scientific analysis of the word 'head' in Psalms 108-110 indicates from another theme (war) and perspective (honour), how the imagery of the head communicates warfare, develops and establishes a connection between Psalms 108-110. In this two-part article, this is established by indicating in the first article that the imagery of the head can be considered as part of warfare imagery. The value system of honour and shame as expressions of the function and purpose of the warfare imagery is made through a social-scientific analysis of the head. The iconography of different ancient Near Eastern contexts is used as an extra-textual source to elucidate the concept of the head as an aspect of warfare imagery, expressed through honour and shame. Part two (the second article) of this article examines and applies the use of the imagery of the head in Psalms 108-110 by integrating the deductions made in this first part of this article. This helps to indicate the development and connection between Psalms 108-110 through the imagery of the head. <![CDATA[<b>'Off with their heads!' The imagery of the head in the trilogy of Psalms 108-110 (Part 2)</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100021&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en A social-scientific analysis of the word 'head' in Psalms 108-110 indicates from another theme (war) and perspective (honour) how the imagery of the head is used to communicate warfare, and to develop and establish the connections between Psalms 108 to 110. This two-part article indicates (in the first article) that the imagery of the head can be considered as part of the imagery of warfare. The value system of honour and shame as expressions of the function and purpose of the warfare imagery is made through a social-scientific analysis of the imagery of the head. The iconography of different ancient Near Eastern contexts is used as extra-textual sources to elucidate the concept of the head as an aspect of warfare imagery, expressing honour and shame. The second article examines and applies the use of the imagery of the head in Psalms 108-110 by integrating the deductions made in this first part. This helps to indicate the development and connections between Psalms 108-110 through utilisation of the imagery of the head. <![CDATA[<b>The Word and the Spirit - Michael Welker's theological hermeneutics Part 2</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100022&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en In the first part of the essay it will be argued that Welker's differentiated understanding of the Word allows him to make sense of the relation between the Spirit and the Word. In the light of the unbreakable interrelation between the Word and the Spirit, it is possible to understand why Welker finds the biblical traditions to be the primary witness to the Spirit of God. It will also become clear why he understands the biblical traditions to be convincing in pluralistic societies. The second part of the essay focuses on the deep polemical foundations of Welker's theology of the Spirit. Welker, it is argued, who wants to write a 'realistic theology', develops his thoughts on the Spirit against the background of what he conceives to be the captivity of a theology of the Spirit in metaphysical and abstract theories, dialogical two-way thinking, and social moralism. These forms of thought serve as the negative background against which Welker then further develops his thoughts on theology. <![CDATA[<b>A department under siege: How Philosophy at Stellenbosch was split in order to survive</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100023&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article discusses the extraordinary history of the teaching of philosophy at Stellenbosch University, with a particular focus on the events that led to the split of the department in 1967, and its later reunification in the late 1980's. The tensions that characterised these events, ultimately leading to the split of the department, were informed by resistance on the part of the Dutch Reformed Church (DRC) clergy, embodied by the supervisory body ('kuratorium') presiding over what would later become the faculty of theology of the Stellenbosch University, to the seemingly unorthodox and controversial interpretations of religious doctrine by a lecturer within the department of philosophy, Dr JJ Degenaar. The eventual solution to these differences was the initial creation of two 'streams' in the department of philosophy, one of which would be political philosophy taught by Degenaar, and ultimately the creation of a separate department of political philosophy, headed by Degenaar. The article also deals with the process of re-unification of the two departments in the late 1980's. Several insights can be gleaned from an analysis of these events. Firstly, they reveal the extent to which the DRC curatory was able to influence academic affairs at that time, as well as to the extent to which Stellenbosch University allowed its institutional autonomy to be compromised. Secondly, they show how a certain model of religious experience and faith that was quite prominent in DRC circles in the late nineteenth century, was systematically overtaken by another model in the course of the early twentieth century. Finally, they show that within the two departments, a healthy culture of not only respect and collegiality, but also continued philosophical and political debate, was maintained throughout the 20 years of formal (30 years of effective) separation, thus illustrating the value of dialogue over intellectual immobility. <![CDATA[<b>The Spirit of generosity: A new economic dispensation in the wake of Pentecost?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100024&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The nature of the economic formation in the Early Church has been widely debated through the centuries. In his work, Das Kapital, Karl Marx quotes Acts 2:44-45, and even supplies these verses as his reason for hating God. As in the case of Marx and his compatriots, several current biblical scholars (especially those from poor communities) are still disillusioned by their view that the initial drive towards sharing money and property have soon been watered down by the Early Church. This article's main focus is on the way in which reciprocity sheds new light on the economics of the Early Church. It concludes that economics in the Apostolic Era and the Early Church introduced a clear departure from the monetary policies exercised in the First Century Temple in Jerusalem, and in the Synagogues. Not only the main 'economic' events in Acts, but also the subsequent results in developing congregations, then and now, are discussed. <![CDATA[<b>Die boodskap van die kruis as die middelpunt van Pauliniese teologie</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100025&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Within early Christianity Paul of Tarsus is a representative of the kerygmatic tradition in which Christ's death and resurrection are viewed as the central event of salvation. In this sense he adopts the traditional interpretations of Jesus' death. However, he also reverses traditional hermeneutics by suggesting a new reading of Christ's death, called 'theology of the cross'. This innovative interpretation considers the cross as the exclusive locus of God's revelation, his judgment and salvation. This way of interpreting forms the structural backbone of Pauline theology. <![CDATA[<b>Why faith makes sense: On Graham Ward's <i>Unbelievable</i></b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100026&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Ward's recent volume on the entwining of belief and perception, while not being an explicitly theological monograph, nonetheless evinces a subtle texture that displays his continuing fidelity to certain aspects of Radical Orthodoxy's vision. (Ward, Graham 2013. Unbelievable: Why We Believe and Why We Don't. London and New York: I. B. Tauris; ISBN: 971780767352) This can be seen in its interdisciplinary focus and its rejection of dualistic philosophies (including the supposed divisions between the sacred and the secular, nature and grace, transcendence and immanence, visibility and invisibility). He argues for the ultimate 'fittingness' between mind and world, thereby rejecting any representationalist account of this relation. Viewing the practices of belief within a re-telling of evolutionary history and phenomenological accounts of perception, Ward seeks to show the pervasiveness of dispositional beliefs within all worldly interactions. Consequentially, 'belief' cannot therefore be relegated to an epiphenomenal or lesser form of knowing, since all seeing is a seeing-as, with the result being that it is imbued with the valences of affect and valuation. Religious faith then is simply a deepening of the logic that is already present within ordinary modes of finite engagement, and therefore should not be seen as an 'unnatural' intervention within the realm of human culture. Overall then, this work can be summarized as an apologetic for the rationality of belief in our 'secularized' societies, and furthermore, for the constitutive role of belief and faith for sensibility as such. <![CDATA[<b>Elliot, John H.<i> Beware the Evil Eye: The Evil Eye in the Bible and the Ancient World. Postbiblical Israel and Early Christianity through Late Antiquity</i></b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100027&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Ward's recent volume on the entwining of belief and perception, while not being an explicitly theological monograph, nonetheless evinces a subtle texture that displays his continuing fidelity to certain aspects of Radical Orthodoxy's vision. (Ward, Graham 2013. Unbelievable: Why We Believe and Why We Don't. London and New York: I. B. Tauris; ISBN: 971780767352) This can be seen in its interdisciplinary focus and its rejection of dualistic philosophies (including the supposed divisions between the sacred and the secular, nature and grace, transcendence and immanence, visibility and invisibility). He argues for the ultimate 'fittingness' between mind and world, thereby rejecting any representationalist account of this relation. Viewing the practices of belief within a re-telling of evolutionary history and phenomenological accounts of perception, Ward seeks to show the pervasiveness of dispositional beliefs within all worldly interactions. Consequentially, 'belief' cannot therefore be relegated to an epiphenomenal or lesser form of knowing, since all seeing is a seeing-as, with the result being that it is imbued with the valences of affect and valuation. Religious faith then is simply a deepening of the logic that is already present within ordinary modes of finite engagement, and therefore should not be seen as an 'unnatural' intervention within the realm of human culture. Overall then, this work can be summarized as an apologetic for the rationality of belief in our 'secularized' societies, and furthermore, for the constitutive role of belief and faith for sensibility as such. <![CDATA[<b>Muis, Jan<i>; Onze Vader. Christelijk spreken over God</i></b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100028&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Ward's recent volume on the entwining of belief and perception, while not being an explicitly theological monograph, nonetheless evinces a subtle texture that displays his continuing fidelity to certain aspects of Radical Orthodoxy's vision. (Ward, Graham 2013. Unbelievable: Why We Believe and Why We Don't. London and New York: I. B. Tauris; ISBN: 971780767352) This can be seen in its interdisciplinary focus and its rejection of dualistic philosophies (including the supposed divisions between the sacred and the secular, nature and grace, transcendence and immanence, visibility and invisibility). He argues for the ultimate 'fittingness' between mind and world, thereby rejecting any representationalist account of this relation. Viewing the practices of belief within a re-telling of evolutionary history and phenomenological accounts of perception, Ward seeks to show the pervasiveness of dispositional beliefs within all worldly interactions. Consequentially, 'belief' cannot therefore be relegated to an epiphenomenal or lesser form of knowing, since all seeing is a seeing-as, with the result being that it is imbued with the valences of affect and valuation. Religious faith then is simply a deepening of the logic that is already present within ordinary modes of finite engagement, and therefore should not be seen as an 'unnatural' intervention within the realm of human culture. Overall then, this work can be summarized as an apologetic for the rationality of belief in our 'secularized' societies, and furthermore, for the constitutive role of belief and faith for sensibility as such. <![CDATA[<b>Nürnberger</b><b> Klaus. <i>Faith in Christ Today. Invitation to Systematic Theology</i></b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2413-94672017000100029&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Ward's recent volume on the entwining of belief and perception, while not being an explicitly theological monograph, nonetheless evinces a subtle texture that displays his continuing fidelity to certain aspects of Radical Orthodoxy's vision. (Ward, Graham 2013. Unbelievable: Why We Believe and Why We Don't. London and New York: I. B. Tauris; ISBN: 971780767352) This can be seen in its interdisciplinary focus and its rejection of dualistic philosophies (including the supposed divisions between the sacred and the secular, nature and grace, transcendence and immanence, visibility and invisibility). He argues for the ultimate 'fittingness' between mind and world, thereby rejecting any representationalist account of this relation. Viewing the practices of belief within a re-telling of evolutionary history and phenomenological accounts of perception, Ward seeks to show the pervasiveness of dispositional beliefs within all worldly interactions. Consequentially, 'belief' cannot therefore be relegated to an epiphenomenal or lesser form of knowing, since all seeing is a seeing-as, with the result being that it is imbued with the valences of affect and valuation. Religious faith then is simply a deepening of the logic that is already present within ordinary modes of finite engagement, and therefore should not be seen as an 'unnatural' intervention within the realm of human culture. Overall then, this work can be summarized as an apologetic for the rationality of belief in our 'secularized' societies, and furthermore, for the constitutive role of belief and faith for sensibility as such.