Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Journal of Occupational Therapy]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2310-383320120002&lang=es vol. 42 num. 2 lang. es <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Editorial comment</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332012000200001&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es <![CDATA[<b>Letter to the editor</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332012000200002&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es <![CDATA[<b>The relationship between developmental dyspraxia and sensory responsivity in children aged four to eight years - Part II</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332012000200003&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The relationship between developmental dyspraxia and sensory responsivity was investigated through correlation of the SIPT, Sensory Profile and Sensory Profile School Companion scores. The statistical analysis of data did not reveal an unambiguous relationship, but offered some significant weak inverse correlations and one significant weak positive correlation that were discussed in a preceding article. These findings gave rise to suggestions for future research which will be discussed in this article. Furthermore, clinical analysis of the data set produced interesting results that are worth mentioning and discussion. The integration of results from statistical analysis and clinical analysis are provided in this article and may offer valuable information about children's sensory responsivity tendencies in the presence of certain types of developmental dyspraxia. The limitations of this study are given to guide researchers in the selection of methodology and measurement instruments for future research studies. <![CDATA[<b>Incorporating a client-centered approach in the development of occupational therapy outcome domains for mental health care settings in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332012000200004&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Occupational therapists use a client-centered approach as part of embracing a philosophy of respect for, and partnership with people receiving services. This approach must also be incorporated in measuring outcomes of the service and clients must have input in evaluating the outcomes of their intervention. This article reports on a specific phase of a larger study in which clients have been included in confirming the domains for an outcome measure in occupational therapy in mental health care settings. A case study strategy was used which enabled mental health care users to express their needs and expectations of the occupational therapy service. These were captured during 12 individual interviews and two focus groups. The findings were thematically analysed and constantly compared with the domains identified by occupational therapy clinicians in Phase 1 of the larger study. Results from this study indicated that the service which the participating occupational therapy clinicians were rendering, were in keeping with the needs and expectations of the mental health care users. <![CDATA[<b>Assessment of record keeping at schools for learners with special educational needs in the Western Cape</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332012000200005&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This study investigated occupational therapy record keeping at schools for learners with special educational needs (LSEN). A review of the records in the form of an audit on 76 occupational therapy files at four LSEN schools was completed using a checklist designed for the purpose of the research. Except for the general section on record keeping in the audit most of the information on the checklist was recorded less than 50% of the time in the learners' files. A number of factors including the roles and expectations of occupational therapists at the schools and a lack of clear guidelines from the Western Cape Education Department as to what should be recorded were found to influence record keeping. The quality of record keeping in terms of access, storage and retrieval was also considered. A redesigned checklist was drawn up to assist occupational therapists at LSEN schools to audit their records and to use as a guideline for improving the quality of the record keeping. <![CDATA[<b>The DTVP-2 visual closure subtest: A closer look</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332012000200006&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The Developmental Test of Visual Perception, 2nd edition (DTVP-2), is a valuable measuring tool to assess children's visual perceptual abilities. Although this test is standardised for the American population, it is often used by South African occupational therapists. The DTVP-2 consists of eight sub-tests, of which one is the visual closure sub-test. Clinical experience and research have shown that children often score below average on the visual closure sub-test, despite scoring average or above average on the other sub-tests. A quantitative, descriptive study investigated the validity of the DTVP-2's visual closure subtest. Forty children, five years of age, regardless of race, who could understand and speak English, participated in the study conducted in Bloemfontein, South Africa. Each child completed the DTVP-2 according to the prescribed procedures. Forty per cent of the children scored below average in the visual closure sub-test, which was statistically significantly lower than the other sub-tests. Therapists using this test should interpret the results of the visual closure sub-test with care, and consider its influence on the General Visual Perception Quotient. This study emphasises the need for a visual perceptual test standardised for the South African population. <![CDATA[<b>Brain development - Milestones and learning</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332012000200007&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The Developmental Test of Visual Perception, 2nd edition (DTVP-2), is a valuable measuring tool to assess children's visual perceptual abilities. Although this test is standardised for the American population, it is often used by South African occupational therapists. The DTVP-2 consists of eight sub-tests, of which one is the visual closure sub-test. Clinical experience and research have shown that children often score below average on the visual closure sub-test, despite scoring average or above average on the other sub-tests. A quantitative, descriptive study investigated the validity of the DTVP-2's visual closure subtest. Forty children, five years of age, regardless of race, who could understand and speak English, participated in the study conducted in Bloemfontein, South Africa. Each child completed the DTVP-2 according to the prescribed procedures. Forty per cent of the children scored below average in the visual closure sub-test, which was statistically significantly lower than the other sub-tests. Therapists using this test should interpret the results of the visual closure sub-test with care, and consider its influence on the General Visual Perception Quotient. This study emphasises the need for a visual perceptual test standardised for the South African population. <![CDATA[<b>Vocational Rehabilitation and Mental Health</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332012000200008&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The Developmental Test of Visual Perception, 2nd edition (DTVP-2), is a valuable measuring tool to assess children's visual perceptual abilities. Although this test is standardised for the American population, it is often used by South African occupational therapists. The DTVP-2 consists of eight sub-tests, of which one is the visual closure sub-test. Clinical experience and research have shown that children often score below average on the visual closure sub-test, despite scoring average or above average on the other sub-tests. A quantitative, descriptive study investigated the validity of the DTVP-2's visual closure subtest. Forty children, five years of age, regardless of race, who could understand and speak English, participated in the study conducted in Bloemfontein, South Africa. Each child completed the DTVP-2 according to the prescribed procedures. Forty per cent of the children scored below average in the visual closure sub-test, which was statistically significantly lower than the other sub-tests. Therapists using this test should interpret the results of the visual closure sub-test with care, and consider its influence on the General Visual Perception Quotient. This study emphasises the need for a visual perceptual test standardised for the South African population.