Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Journal of Occupational Therapy]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2310-383320100001&lang=en vol. 40 num. 1 lang. en <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>The right to rehabilitation: From policy development to implementation</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332010000100001&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en <![CDATA[<b>Human rights and workman's compensation: The experiences of two injured workers</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332010000100002&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article will highlight examples where human rights were abused and promoted through the description of the experiences of injured workers of the Compensation Process in South Africa. A collective case study design was used and data was collected through semi-structured interviews. The article reports on the findings of a with-in case analysis of two participants. Three themes associated with human rights emerged. These relate to dealing with the consequences of losing a job and not being able to care for self and family, feeling isolated in the compensation process and not being acknowledged. Recommendations are made in relation to practice and education. <![CDATA[<b>Exploring the tensions of sustaining economic empowerment of persons with disabilities through open labour market employment in the Cape Metropole</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332010000100003&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This paper examines the experiences of persons with disabilities (PWDs) who enter and exit employment at a company in the Cape Metropole of the Western Cape Province in South Africa. The aim of the study was to explore the factors which cause PWDs to remain in or leave employment in the open labour market. The literature review will consider the concepts of disability, poverty and economic empowerment. A collective case study was used and in-depth interviews with five disabled employees were analysed to generate categories and sub-categories from the data. Two themes are discussed, namely "I can say I got a home, it's a home to me" and "Disability in the workplace: a double-edged sword". The themes represent findings that revealed that money earned through employment motivated the participants and improved their independence, self-sufficiency and their contribution to society. Simultaneously though, it was found that earning an income caused increased stress for the participants, due to the effects that it had on their eligibility for a disability grant. The paper concludes by giving recommendations concerning economic empowerment of PWDs in the context of the social security grant. <![CDATA[<b>Promoting human rights: Understanding the barriers to self-help groups for women who are carers of children with disabilities</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332010000100004&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Mothers and other caregivers of children with disabilities are usually the main advocates for the rights of their children. For them to effectively advocate for the inclusion of their children with disabilities (CWD) into their communities, they need to be empowered to ensure that their rights are respected. Support or self-help groups are modalities which may facilitate processes promoting their empowerment. This article describes the factors which influence the functioning of a parent support and self-help group in an impoverished community in Cape Town. An action research study was conducted to explore the barriers influencing the achievement of desired advocacy and support goals of this parent support and self help group. Data were gathered through a series of focus groups. The study yielded three themes, namely: "Tensions with becoming a self-help group", "I versus We" and "The process". The themes highlighted that women experienced missed opportunities, multiple roles, negative habitual behaviour and time poverty as consequences of their socio-political and socio-cultural environment. These impacted on the efficiency with which they could address their self-help goals, more particularly they compromised their contribution to community development. The implications of this for occupational therapy practice are identified. <![CDATA[<b>Occupational therapy and the quest for human dignity: Why human rights matter</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332010000100005&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Human rights are often regarded as an encumbered term. People, who are marginalised by socio-political factors beyond their control, grapple with the relevance of human rights to their everyday life experience. Based on South Africa's history many citizens have experienced discriminatory barriers of some sort, therefore educating students and clients in human rights is imperative. This paper explores a critical view of the relevance of human rights to occupational therapy in terms of the various offices an occupational therapist occupies. An overview is given of possible challenges that might need to be overcome in applying the human rights framework in everyday life and practice with the view to stimulating discourse on cultivating a human rights culture in the occupational therapy profession's quest for human dignity. <![CDATA[<b>Provision of rehabilitation services within the District Health System - The experience of rehabilitation managers in facilitating this right for people with disabilities</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332010000100006&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The South African government has embarked on widescale policy reforms in the provision of essential health and rehabilitation services, especially for vulnerable groups of society. The District Health System was created to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the health system by transferring authority over decision-making to a more local level. These reforms have resulted in the need to restructure, reorganise and reorientate service providers towards a rights-based approach in the delivery of these services. Primary research, using a qualitative case study method to explore the challenges in implementing policy changes within a rights-based framework, was conducted at a selected urban district in South Africa. Findings show that there were several factors that impeded the capacity to deliver rehabilitation services within the new policy framework at the district level. These factors have constrained successful policy implementation intended to guide rehabilitation services within the public health sector, resulting in the rights-based approach to service delivery being compromised. <![CDATA[<b>Wheelchairs - A human rights issue or a mere mobility device? Personal reflections of an occupational therapist</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332010000100007&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en People with disabilities, such as those with mobility impairments are particularly vulnerable to the abuse of many of their human rights. There seems to be little difference whether they access services through the public or private health care system. Drawining on the author's many years of experience as the project coordinator of a wheelchair donor programme in the province of KwaZulu Natal (KZN) in South Africa (S.A.), thh article seeks to explore some of these issues with the use of ilustrative case studies clients accessing wheelchairs both through the public health and the private sector. <![CDATA[<b>Book Reviews</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332010000100008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en People with disabilities, such as those with mobility impairments are particularly vulnerable to the abuse of many of their human rights. There seems to be little difference whether they access services through the public or private health care system. Drawining on the author's many years of experience as the project coordinator of a wheelchair donor programme in the province of KwaZulu Natal (KZN) in South Africa (S.A.), thh article seeks to explore some of these issues with the use of ilustrative case studies clients accessing wheelchairs both through the public health and the private sector.