Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Journal of Occupational Therapy]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2310-383320090003&lang= vol. 39 num. 3 lang. <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Editorial comment</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332009000300001&lng=&nrm=iso&tlng= <![CDATA[<b>Assessment of posture: Accuracy of the plumb line method</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332009000300002&lng=&nrm=iso&tlng= <![CDATA[<b>The 21<sup>st</sup> Vona du Toit Memorial Lecture 2009: Wisdom from within: Finding modern truths in traditional proverbs</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332009000300003&lng=&nrm=iso&tlng= The South African occupational therapy profession is not immune to professional migration of colleagues to richer countries due to various external pull factors and internal push factors. This paper aims to identify and describe important pull and push factors as experienced by occupational therapists currently working in the country. This information was obtained through a survey and personal interviews. The paper concludes with ten guidelines on how we can collectively work towards motivating occupational therapists to stay and work in South Africa. This is done through the wisdom of Sepedi proverbs and applied to the modern context of South Africa. <![CDATA[<b>How teachers can manage attention span and activity level difficulties due to Foetal Alcohol Syndrome in the classroom: An occupational therapy approach</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332009000300004&lng=&nrm=iso&tlng= Foetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is a disorder that can occur in a child whose mother consumed excessive amounts of alcohol during pregnancy. Children with FAS experience physical, cognitive and/ or behavioural problems, with possible life long implications┬╣. Principles of Evidence Based Practice (EBP) were used to identify methods that teachers could use to stimulate the development of learners with FAS in the classroom. The project took place at a school in Genadendal, South Africa where teachers experienced difficulties with learners who presented with developmental delay due to FAS. Through observations, interviews and assessments of the learners, multiple problems were determined of which activity level and attention span problems were prioritised. A literature search was carried out to identify intervention strategies which could be applied in a classroom setting. Compensatory strategies were chosen and divided into adaptations of person, environment and occupation. Teachers were trained in these strategies through a workshop which was supplemented with a sourcebook. <![CDATA[<b>Hedges in occupational therapy research texts</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332009000300005&lng=&nrm=iso&tlng= The study examined an aspect of research writing, namely hedging. The aim was to establish the nature of the relation between the quality of the article and report writing in occupational therapy and the density of hedges in such writing. The texts comprised undergraduate reports, which were divided into two achievement groups, namely high and low achievers and journal articles by occupational therapists. Articles were included because it was assumed that they exemplified good writing, and accordingly, would be appropriately hedged, and would provide a reliable basis for comparing the student groups. Hyland's (1998) analytical framework was used. While statistical tests revealed no differences between the student groups, overall, the tests revealed significant differences in the use of hedges between the professional and student writers. In the light of these findings, it is suggested that hedging in research writing be studied and taught to students in order to assist them in their studies and careers. <![CDATA[<b>Applying the Model of Creative Ability to patients with diabetic foot problems</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332009000300006&lng=&nrm=iso&tlng= Motivation is recognised as an important factor in the treatment of any patient12. There has been an increase in the number of people diagnosed with diabetes, and, thus an increase in the number of people with foot complications as a result of diabetes. Motivation has been identified as a factor contributing to the treatment outcomes of a person with this type of problem3,4,5,6,7, and an assessment into the level of motivation is recommended in the context of this condition. Currently, an assessment of motivation has not been sufficiently investigated. The Model of Creative Ability (MCA) provides a framework within which to assess intrinsic motivation and principles with which to treat a patient, based on the determined level of motivation, also referred to as levels of creative ability1,2,8. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether occupational therapy, tailored to the level of motivation, for patients with diabetic foot complications, has more positive treatment outcomes than occupational therapy that is not. A programme was therefore carried out in which two groups of patients were treated, an experimental group receiving intervention according to level of motivation and a control group. In spite of a small sample size, the results of the research indicated a more positive outcome when occupational therapy was tailored using the MCA, for patients suffering from diabetic foot complications. <![CDATA[<b>Letter to the Editor</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332009000300007&lng=&nrm=iso&tlng= Motivation is recognised as an important factor in the treatment of any patient12. There has been an increase in the number of people diagnosed with diabetes, and, thus an increase in the number of people with foot complications as a result of diabetes. Motivation has been identified as a factor contributing to the treatment outcomes of a person with this type of problem3,4,5,6,7, and an assessment into the level of motivation is recommended in the context of this condition. Currently, an assessment of motivation has not been sufficiently investigated. The Model of Creative Ability (MCA) provides a framework within which to assess intrinsic motivation and principles with which to treat a patient, based on the determined level of motivation, also referred to as levels of creative ability1,2,8. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether occupational therapy, tailored to the level of motivation, for patients with diabetic foot complications, has more positive treatment outcomes than occupational therapy that is not. A programme was therefore carried out in which two groups of patients were treated, an experimental group receiving intervention according to level of motivation and a control group. In spite of a small sample size, the results of the research indicated a more positive outcome when occupational therapy was tailored using the MCA, for patients suffering from diabetic foot complications. <![CDATA[<b>Book Reviews</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332009000300008&lng=&nrm=iso&tlng= Motivation is recognised as an important factor in the treatment of any patient12. There has been an increase in the number of people diagnosed with diabetes, and, thus an increase in the number of people with foot complications as a result of diabetes. Motivation has been identified as a factor contributing to the treatment outcomes of a person with this type of problem3,4,5,6,7, and an assessment into the level of motivation is recommended in the context of this condition. Currently, an assessment of motivation has not been sufficiently investigated. The Model of Creative Ability (MCA) provides a framework within which to assess intrinsic motivation and principles with which to treat a patient, based on the determined level of motivation, also referred to as levels of creative ability1,2,8. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether occupational therapy, tailored to the level of motivation, for patients with diabetic foot complications, has more positive treatment outcomes than occupational therapy that is not. A programme was therefore carried out in which two groups of patients were treated, an experimental group receiving intervention according to level of motivation and a control group. In spite of a small sample size, the results of the research indicated a more positive outcome when occupational therapy was tailored using the MCA, for patients suffering from diabetic foot complications.