Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Journal of Occupational Therapy]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2310-383320090002&lang=en vol. 39 num. 2 lang. en <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Specialist registration in occupational therapy. Is it desirable? Should it be an option?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332009000200001&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en <![CDATA[<b>A framework for staff development in the School for Allied Health Professions, University of the Free State</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332009000200002&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article reports on the development of a staff development framework for the School for Allied Health Professions (SAHP) at the University of the Free State. The aim of compiling such a framework was to create a structure to serve as a master plan for staff development planning. A comprehensive literature study was done to identify the factors that influence staff development at Higher Education Institutions. A questionnaire was used to capture staff perceptions of skill development. Indicators from the literature as well as data from the completed questionnaires determined which components were included in the framework. The framework consists of three phases namely, planning, operational and evaluation phases. Each phase showed the complex interaction of factors that should be taken into account. The framework can serve as basis for the development of own modules for staff development within the different departments in the SAHP as well as other departments within Allied Health Professions in South Africa. <![CDATA[<b>Hipster fashion and body alignment</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332009000200003&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en <![CDATA[<b>The value of the service offered by the community rehabilitation worker: Lessons from a review</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332009000200004&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This study was undertaken to assess the value of the Community Rehabilitation Workers (CRWs) to the people living in the rural community. Although CBR is no longer delivered through the services of CRWs the results of this evaluation were thought to be valuable in providing some lessons that would help in the implementation of an outreach service delivered by profession specific assistants. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were incorporated in the research design and analysis, all of which contributed to a judgment of the value of the CRWS' service. The CRWs played a role in formulating the qualitative questions that were asked at a workshop. Resulting from this a questionnaire was compiled which provided information on the components of Community Based Rehabilitation delivered by the CRWs as per the definition given by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as well as information about the value of the service. In addition the CRWs' time and client's statistic sheets for a specified nine month time period were collected and analysed. The researchers compared their findings to a previous evaluation of the CBR programme. The data collected provided information on the coverage i.e. the number and types of clients seen, the efficiency of the service through an analysis of the time usage, the effectiveness through an analysis of the resources to which clients had been referred as well as the perceptions of the CRWs regarding the value of the work that they were doing. Relevance was ascertained by looking at the activities that were engaged in during the work as well as through the interviews. It was concluded that the CRWs provide a valuable service to the rural community in terms of the number of clients and the range of diagnoses they treat, assisting their clients to gain access to various resources, and through their use of appropriate activities and techniques for treatment and in their interaction with the community. They also felt that they offered a valuable service to the people with a disability in the villages that they served. <![CDATA[<b>Visual-motor integration (VMI) - a predictor for handwriting in Grade 0 children</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332009000200005&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en INTRODUCTION: Occupational therapists (OTs) are often faced with the late referral of children with handwriting difficulties when intervention is less effective. It is thus essential for the OT and the teacher to be able to identify these children early for maximum therapeutic intervention. The researchers therefore attempted to investigate whether visual motor integration (VMI) can be a predictor of handwriting skills in Grade 0 children METHODOLOGY: A standardised visual perceptual test (the Test ofVisual Motor Integration) 9 and handwriting assessments were conducted with 53 Grade 0 children in mainstream schools around Durban in an attempt to establish a link. Handwriting was analysed using adapted criteria from the Writing Rate Information Test (WRIT), which was developed by Steinhardt et al10 in Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa RESULTS: A significant correlation between the formation of letters e, f, and k and visual motor integration (VMI) was noted in the sample, whilst no significant link was found between legibility of handwriting and VMI. A relationship was found between writing the name from memory and VMI and a significant correlation was found when comparing reversals in a child's attempt at writing their name from memory and his / her VMI score It was concluded that visual-motor integration as determined by the Test of Visual Motor Integration can be a significant predictor of a child's ability to form letters, write his name from memory and of the presence of letter reversals in writing in the Grade 0 child. <![CDATA[<b>Book Reviews</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332009000200006&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en INTRODUCTION: Occupational therapists (OTs) are often faced with the late referral of children with handwriting difficulties when intervention is less effective. It is thus essential for the OT and the teacher to be able to identify these children early for maximum therapeutic intervention. The researchers therefore attempted to investigate whether visual motor integration (VMI) can be a predictor of handwriting skills in Grade 0 children METHODOLOGY: A standardised visual perceptual test (the Test ofVisual Motor Integration) 9 and handwriting assessments were conducted with 53 Grade 0 children in mainstream schools around Durban in an attempt to establish a link. Handwriting was analysed using adapted criteria from the Writing Rate Information Test (WRIT), which was developed by Steinhardt et al10 in Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa RESULTS: A significant correlation between the formation of letters e, f, and k and visual motor integration (VMI) was noted in the sample, whilst no significant link was found between legibility of handwriting and VMI. A relationship was found between writing the name from memory and VMI and a significant correlation was found when comparing reversals in a child's attempt at writing their name from memory and his / her VMI score It was concluded that visual-motor integration as determined by the Test of Visual Motor Integration can be a significant predictor of a child's ability to form letters, write his name from memory and of the presence of letter reversals in writing in the Grade 0 child.