Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Journal of Occupational Therapy]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2310-383320080003&lang=en vol. 38 num. 3 lang. en <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Note from the Editor</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332008000300001&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en <![CDATA[<b>"Return to work" - Acute low back pain management</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332008000300002&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en <![CDATA[<b>The 20<sup>th</sup> Vona du Toit Memorial Lecture 2007: Proposing the social atom of occupational therapy: Dealing with trauma as part of an integrated inclusive intervention</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332008000300003&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Occupational therapy today needs to re-position itself in context to be relevant to the traumatised psyche of the South African nation. The social atom of the profession needs to relate more congruently to groups, communities and populations. Addressing the secondary causal issues underlying impairment, means our practice will increasingly become multi-modal, using experience and theory from medical, social, environmental, phenomenological and ethnographic models. Occupational therapy in South Africa needs to take the imperative of contextual relevance forward by attending to the traumatic subtexts of practice. Four propositions are suggested. 1. Inclusive, holistic practice applies to both individuals and collectives. 2. Occupational therapy is located in a social atom that enables it to be a significant role-player for social change. 3. The social atom of occupational therapy paves the way for working with the traumatised individuals and communities. 4. Service providers should manage vicarious traumatisation proactively. My hope is that these four propositions will galvanise debate about the contribution of occupational therapy to the healing of a society traumatised by violence and other forms of oppression and abuse. <![CDATA[<b>Roles, experiences and needs of caregivers of people with Parkinson's disease in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332008000300004&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive, debilitating and demanding condition. Caregivers must continually cope with a variety of stressors due to changes resulting from the disease process. The aim of this descriptive study was to investigate the roles, experiences and needs of caregivers of people with PD in South Africa. A convenient sample of 400 people with PD was drawn from the Parkinson's Association of South Africa (PASA) address list. Questionnaires were sent to these people in the hope of identifying caregivers. There were 131 respondents (28.7% response rate). Most caregivers were spouses and the majority was not employed. Sixty percent felt they were adequately informed about PD and 61% felt they received adequate support. Caregivers experienced stress as a result of the disease and the financial burden it placed on the family. The main needs identified by caregivers were emotional support, strategies to ease care giving tasks, time to socialise and free time. <![CDATA[<b>Evaluation of Vestibular proprioceptive (VPP) functioning in children: Identification of relevant test items</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332008000300005&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en study was undertaken in the absence of a standardised test to evaluate vestibular proprioceptive processing (VPP). By a process of test development, 18 appropriately difficult and clearly discriminatory test items were identified. These test items can now be used as a basis to assemble and standardise a VPP test. <![CDATA[<b>The right to respect for autonomy - Part II</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332008000300006&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This paper, the second in a series, approaches patient autonomy from an occupational therapy practitioner perspective. The Occupational Therapy Codes of Ethics as well as the Health Professions Council Guidelines for good practice are briefly reviewed, rights identified, limitations to autonomy discussed and practical implications and explicit guidelines for practice, as relevant to different areas of practice, proposed. <![CDATA[<b>Towards a uniform taxonomy of motor terminology: Stage 2</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332008000300007&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en A uniform taxonomy within occupational therapy has become a recent focus of discussion in the literature. The study reported on in this paper investigated how South African occupational therapists use and understand terms related to motor performance in children with learning difficulties and developmental delay. This article reports on the second stage of a Delphi Technique, in which the information from an initial study was reformulated. Sixteen expert occupational therapists were then surveyed and asked to rate the level of association (weak to strong) of each characteristic of movement to six motor component terms and to define each term in their own words. The results yielded both quantitative and qualitative data, which revealed that while there was strong consensus among the occupational therapists on some aspects of motor terminology, there was still ambiguity and overlap of understanding, which was reflected in a worrying inconsistency of the descriptions of these terms in the literature and how occupational therapists use the terms in clinical practice. <![CDATA[<b>Book Reviews</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332008000300008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en A uniform taxonomy within occupational therapy has become a recent focus of discussion in the literature. The study reported on in this paper investigated how South African occupational therapists use and understand terms related to motor performance in children with learning difficulties and developmental delay. This article reports on the second stage of a Delphi Technique, in which the information from an initial study was reformulated. Sixteen expert occupational therapists were then surveyed and asked to rate the level of association (weak to strong) of each characteristic of movement to six motor component terms and to define each term in their own words. The results yielded both quantitative and qualitative data, which revealed that while there was strong consensus among the occupational therapists on some aspects of motor terminology, there was still ambiguity and overlap of understanding, which was reflected in a worrying inconsistency of the descriptions of these terms in the literature and how occupational therapists use the terms in clinical practice.