Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Journal of Occupational Therapy]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2310-383320180003&lang=pt vol. 48 num. 3 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Road safety advocacy - a legitimate role for occupational therapists?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332018000300001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Hand health for all: Do undergraduate occupational therapy hand curricula respond to the call?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332018000300002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The call for higher education curricula to be responsive to the South African context is growing louder. Injuries to the hand are common in South Africa and intervention is often provided by novice occupational therapists who may work in complex practice contexts with limited supervision. Comprehensive hand health practice addresses both the biomedical and occupational dimensions of the human hand. Undergraduate education programmes should be responsive to this reality in preparing graduates adequately for hand practice. This article describes the content of hand curricula within occupational therapy undergraduate programmes in South Africa with the purpose of considering how they prepare graduates for the practice realities they may face during community service. A descriptive cross-sectional survey design was used with an online questionnaire aimed at determining the nature and extent of hand curricula presented in South African undergraduate occupational therapy programmes (n=8). Data were analysed using Stata 12. Time allocated to hand impairments varied considerably across universities. While assessment of biomedical performance components were taught by all universities, the occupational perspective was limited. The range and number of hand conditions and treatment modalities that were taught also varied. Findings are discussed against the contextual realities of practice in South Africa, primary health care policy, and national and international minimum standards for the education of occupational therapists. Core aspects of a hand curriculum are proposed as a means to enhance comprehensive hand health practice. <![CDATA[<b>Occupational Therapy in the bereavement process: A meta-synthesis</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332018000300003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Bereavement is a complex process characterised by a state of grief and suffering, which impacts the health and well-being of the bereaved, and extends to their occupational performance. Thus, occupation can be understood to be central in the expression of bereavement after the death of a loved one as it mediates identity formation, interpersonal relationships, a sense of belonging, and future perspectivesPURPOSE: To review English and Portuguese literature and identify how occupational therapists perceive and/or intervene in the bereavement processMETHOD: A meta-synthesis was conducted by database search and article analysisRESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Eight qualitative style articles were analysed. From these, three categories were derived from the content analysis: 1) Relationship between study participants and the deceased; 2) Occupational repercussions of bereavement; and 3) Occupation as a means to an end in the therapy process of the bereaved.CONCLUSIONS: Although the need for studies of the bereavement process and its implications for occupations is urgent, this study points out that occupations can be predictors of understanding the elaboration process through occupational engagement and that they also act as a potential resource to construct meaning about the death of the loved one <![CDATA[<b>Gross motor skills in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332018000300004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: The purpose of the study was to compare gross motor skills in children with and without Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptoms. Children diagnosed with ADHD encounter difficulties in many areas of daily living activities that require motor coordination skills and often perform poorly on motor skills tests. METHOD: A hundred and sixty primary school children (80 with ADHD and 80 controls) between 7-13 years, both females and males, participated in the study. Simple gross motor skills tasks such as walking, standing, catching, dribbling and kicking tasks were employed. The results were compared for gender and age. RESULTS: The children with ADHD showed poorer performance on all tasks. The gender of the participants influenced performance on kicking and dribbling tasks. CONCLUSION: An association between the symptoms of ADHD and gross motor control was demonstrated, implying the need to include gross motor tasks or tests in assessments and interventions of children with ADHD. <![CDATA[<b>Convergent validity of the Richmond Reversal Rating in relation to visual-spatial perception as measured by the SASP</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332018000300005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This study examined the convergent validity of the visual perceptual Richmond Reversal Rating (RRR) assessment, in relation to visual-spatial abilities of young school-aged children, using known-groups validity and convergent validity hypotheses testing. Seventy-two primary school children (Years 1-3) were assessed with the RRR assessment and the Spatial Awareness Skills Program Test (SASP). The Kruskal-Wallis test demonstrated a significant difference between the RRR overall scores and the SAPS grouped scores, H(2) = 6.155, p = .046. Spearman's correlation coefficient revealed a low positive yet significant correlation (r s = .433, p = .000) between the RRR overall scores and the SASP percentile scores, and a significant moderate positive correlation between the RRR overall scores and the SASP scores (r s = .666, p = .000). The results provide evidential support for the convergent validity of the RRR assessment in relation to visual-spatial abilities as measured by the SASP. <![CDATA[<b>Visual perception of five-year-old Afrikaans-speaking children in Bloemfontein using the Beery VMI-6, DTVP-3 and TVPS-3: A follow up study of their English-speaking counterparts in Bloemfontein</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332018000300006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt BACKGROUND AND AIM: Previous research investigated the latest versions of the Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual-motor Integration 6th edition (Beery VMI-6), Development Test of Visual Perception 3rd edition (DTVP-3) and Test of Visual Perceptual Skills 3rd edition (TVPS-3) on five-year-old English-speaking children. This study aimed to extend the investigation, to five-year-old Afrikaans-speaking children, and to compare the results to previous findings on English-speaking children of a similar age. METHODS: A quantitative, cross-sectional investigation into the visual perception and visual-motor performance of five-year-old Afrikaans-speaking children (n=52) was conducted at Afrikaans Language of Learning and Teaching (ALOLT) schools in Bloemfontein, by using these tests according to the prescribed procedures, in a specific order and with adequate breaks between tests. RESULTS: Both language groups' performance on the Beery VMI-6 and DTVP-3 compared well to the American normative sample, but below average on all the TVPS-3 composite scores. The Beery VMI-6 motor coordination sub-test yielded statistically significant gender differences. No significant language differences were noted in the three tests. A statistically significant difference was identified between form constancy and visual closure sub-tests of the DTVP-3 and the TVPS-3, and when the Beery VMI-6 visual-motor integration sub-test was compared to the DTVP-3copying sub-test. CONCLUSIONS: Occupational therapists are encouraged to consider the suitability of the three tests, and further research in this field is recommended. <![CDATA[<b>The facilitators and barriers encountered by South African parents regarding sensory integration occupational therapy</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332018000300007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Differences in parent perceptions regarding occupational therapy using a sensory integration approach to treatment have been noted. The various factors that may influence these perceptions, and how the perceptions may ultimately influence the outcome of the intervention for the child and family were questioned. A phenomenological study revealed a progression that all parents perceived and experienced as the "before", "input" and "after" phases of when their child received occupational therapy/sensory integration (OT/SI). This article focuses specifically on the "input" phase of OT/SI intervention. METHOD: Participants in this study were nine parents of children with difficulties processing and integrating sensory information, who live in the Western Cape, South Africa. Using a qualitative, phenomenological approach, data were collected during face-to-face interviews, participant observation and researcher's field notes. FINDINGS: The main theme related to this phase of analysis was "Just suddenly everything made so much sense". For most participants, this phase brought to light a better understanding of sensory integration disorder (SID), also known as Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) and OT/SI. Data analysis identified two subthemes that catalysed expansion in most participants' understanding, which were the role of the occupational therapist, and the OT/SI intervention process. Within these subthemes, the facilitating factors and barriers of OT/ SI intervention emerged. CONCLUSION: Insight gained from the participants' recommendations and interpretation of findings allowed recommendations to be made within the OT/SI intervention received, in an attempt to overcome the barriers and promote the facilitators that will make a difference to OT/SI in South Africa. <![CDATA[<b>A survey of occupational therapists' involvement in facilitating self-employment for people with disabilities</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332018000300008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt BACKGROUND: In South Africa, occupational therapists are involved with the facilitation of people with disabilities ability to work, but the high unemployment rate in the country affects placement opportunities. Utilising the option of self-employment is a way of addressing this problem OBJECTIVE: To explore the attitude of South African occupational therapists about facilitating self-employment with their clients, their awareness of available resources that support self-employment, if therapists are offering such intervention and what they perceive their role to be within the field METHOD: The study used a quantitative cross-sectional descriptive survey design RESULTS: A positive attitude (90%) and good awareness of available resources (74%) existed amongst participating occupational therapists. Occupational therapy practices did not offer self-employment facilitation in an evidence-based manner. Therapists believed their roles were undefined within the field of self-employment, and their training did not equip them to offer such intervention CONCLUSION: Occupational Therapists agree that self-employment is a good work option for people with a disability and are aware of resources that support such endeavours. The therapeutic practice and role definition is lacking. Occupational therapists have to create evidence that enables transformational and afro-appropriate interventions, for example, self-employment for people with disabilities within their profession <![CDATA[<b>Early Childhood Development: The Disability Policy and its implications for occupational therapists</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332018000300009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The White Paper on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities encapsulates the vision not only for persons with disabilities in South Africa, but for every member of a diverse society. This paper discusses the vision of inclusion and mainstreaming contained in the White Paper and critiques the specific provisions for early childhood development, exploring their implications for training and practice of occupational therapists. Recommendations are made as to how these can be strengthened in achieving the vision of an inclusive society in which young children with disabilities are able to realise their potential. <![CDATA[<b>Occupational Therapy Association of South Africa (OTASA) Position Statement. Enabling community mobility through driver evaluation and rehabilitation: The role of occupational therapists</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332018000300010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The White Paper on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities encapsulates the vision not only for persons with disabilities in South Africa, but for every member of a diverse society. This paper discusses the vision of inclusion and mainstreaming contained in the White Paper and critiques the specific provisions for early childhood development, exploring their implications for training and practice of occupational therapists. Recommendations are made as to how these can be strengthened in achieving the vision of an inclusive society in which young children with disabilities are able to realise their potential. <![CDATA[<b>Occupational Therapy Association of South Africa (OTASA) Position Statement: Spirituality in occupational therapy</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332018000300011&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The White Paper on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities encapsulates the vision not only for persons with disabilities in South Africa, but for every member of a diverse society. This paper discusses the vision of inclusion and mainstreaming contained in the White Paper and critiques the specific provisions for early childhood development, exploring their implications for training and practice of occupational therapists. Recommendations are made as to how these can be strengthened in achieving the vision of an inclusive society in which young children with disabilities are able to realise their potential. <![CDATA[<b>In Commemoration of Christa Meyer 20<sup>th</sup> Oct 1941 - 28<sup>th</sup> Oct 2018</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2310-38332018000300012&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The White Paper on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities encapsulates the vision not only for persons with disabilities in South Africa, but for every member of a diverse society. This paper discusses the vision of inclusion and mainstreaming contained in the White Paper and critiques the specific provisions for early childhood development, exploring their implications for training and practice of occupational therapists. Recommendations are made as to how these can be strengthened in achieving the vision of an inclusive society in which young children with disabilities are able to realise their potential.