Scielo RSS <![CDATA[In die Skriflig ]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2305-085320160004&lang=pt vol. 50 num. 4 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>A style study of the Apostle Paul's communication with Festus and Agrippa: The use of literary Koine Greek in Acts 25:14-22; 26:1-29</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2305-08532016000400001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article defines style, stylistics and literary koine Greek and analyses the literary koine Greek employed in Luke's recording of the Apostle Paul's court case at Caesarea in Acts 25:1422; 26:1-29. The principles and methodology in stylistics are explained and an overview of some of the style studies in the last 30 years is made. Paul demonstrates a literary style of Greek when speaking with Festus and Agrippa. Stylistics defines 'style' as the choices an author makes (whether conscious or subconscious) amongst linguistic possibilities (usually but not always a choice amongst grammatical possibilities). In grammatical studies, rhetoric is the manner of writing. Style study helps to observe the author's emphasis, analogies and message, and helps with the appreciation of communication. <![CDATA[<b>South African Reformed Baptists and contextualisation: Contemporary understanding, attitudes and praxis</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2305-08532016000400002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Postmodernism and urbanisation pose significant challenges and opportunities to Christian witness in the West. In South Africa, Reformed Baptists as well as the Reformed Churches in South Africa (RCSA) seem to be battling to engage with and reach new generations in the cities with the gospel. While the reasons for this may be many and varied, one reason for our faltering and seemingly ineffective witness can be traced back to inadequate and unbiblical views of contextualisation. While South African Reformed Baptists are passionately committed to biblical truth and orthodoxy, they appear to be negligent in the matter of faithful biblical contextualisation. Reformed Baptist pastors appear to be slow to take cognisance of and adjust to the unique challenges and opportunities that Postmodernism and urbanisation presents to gospel ministry in South Africa. Some conservative Baptists are suspicious of, or even critical of contextualisation, considering it a compromise with liberal theology. This article provides an overview of the findings of an empirical research that was done among a selected group of Reformed Baptist pastors as well as a selected group of ministers of the RCSA concerning their views on and practice of contextualisation. The article also provides some critical reflection on the findings and some proposals for more effective outreach to postmodern urban people. <![CDATA[<b>'n Eksegetiese ondersoek na die leierseienskappe wat Paulus in Filippense 3:1-16 toon</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2305-08532016000400003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article is the result of a thesis, submitted in 2015, with the following title: A Pastoral-Theological Study of Effective and Responsible Leadership of the Afrikaans-Speaking Minister in the Congregation's Call. The problem investigated regards the fact that leadership in the church is not defined properly and, as a result, no clear guidance exists for ministers on what is expected of them as leaders. This article focuses on Paul as leader of the New Testament church. An exegetical investigation of Philippians 3:1-16 will be conducted to determine what this passage reveals about his strengths as a leader. <![CDATA[<b>Die retoriese funksie van die wisselwerking tussen 'n profeet en sy gehoor in die boek Esegiël</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2305-08532016000400004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt In the book of the prophet Ezekiel, indications are found of the interaction between the prophet and his audience. Prophecy always had the aim to convince its audience of something and are therefore always of a rhetorical nature. It happens frequently that the rhetorical aim and situation of a prophetic book receives attention. This article attempts to reconstruct the possible original rhetorical situation of those instances where the prophet uses quotations and react on them. Before discussing the different cases, three theoretical issues receive attention, namely the rhetorical approach used in this article, the use of quotations in the Bible and so-called disputations. In the book, quotations occur in two contexts, namely before and after the fall of Jerusalem. The refutation of the quotations aims to address the despondency of the exiles and exhorting them with the message that God will bring deliverance in the future. <![CDATA[<b>Is the adjective distinct from the noun as a grammatical category in biblical Hebrew?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2305-08532016000400005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The adjective is a beleaguered category in biblical Hebrew grammar with many grammars of biblical Hebrew denying that the adjective is a category distinct from substantives. Within a variety of linguistic theories, the status of the adjective as a grammatical category is also debated. Cross-linguistically adjectives exhibit extraordinary variety: in some languages showing similarities to nouns, in others to verbs and in still others to both nouns and verbs. The debate concerning the status of the adjective is mirrored by the broader debate within contemporary linguistics concerning how the issue of grammatical categorisation ought to be approached. In this article, we re-examine the question of whether or not the adjective is a distinct grammatical category from the noun in biblical Hebrew. We approach the question of the status of the adjective as a grammatical category from two perspectives: morphology and syntax. <![CDATA[<b>Fulfilled through the prophets</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2305-08532016000400006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Matthew's use of plēróō to contextualise the Hebrew prophets validates his thesis that Jesus is the Christ, son of David, son of Abraham (1:1).1 To demonstrate this concept, this article examines seven of Matthew's fulfilment statements (1:22; 2:15; 2:17-18; 4:14-16; 8:17; 12:17-21; 21:4-5) introduced by a varied formula of fulfilled through the prophet(s). The article emphasises the Christological element of Matthew's thesis, focusing on Jesus as the Messiah. This is accomplished by means of a critical review of seven fulfilment statements, identifying their Christological context to support Matthew's thesis. <![CDATA[<b>The Lord's Prayer as a paradigm for restorative justice in brokenness</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2305-08532016000400007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The Lord's Prayer has a collective and an individual sense. In a pastoral context it can lead the individual believer to inner healing, transformation, faith and redemption; with the result of a collective sense of merciful, sacrificing, restorative justice that forms a paradigm for restorative justice in a broken society. Ultimately the Lord's Prayer ripples outwards from the supplicant's own needs to the fulfilment of the love commandment towards God and other people. With the use of the Lord's Prayer in the pastoral guidance process, the counselee's attention can shift from a problem-focused attitude to a life of justice, peace and joy. The research question under investigation asks if the Lord's Prayer can really form a paradigm for restorative justice within a situation of brokenness when it forms part of the pastoral guidance process to give structure to the mixture of emotions that the counselee experiences. The pastoral challenge lies in not limiting newly-found healing to the counselling room, but letting it result in a responsible way of life. Two main themes of the Lord's Prayer are discussed, namely, human beings' relationship with God, and their dependence on God for life. The main themes are related to the love commandment, which in itself aims to guide the believer to the realisation of a wider responsibility towards society in respect of merciful, sacrificing, restorative justice that heals brokenness. <![CDATA[<b>Humanity's perceived right to life and the impact thereof on the environment: A perspective from Deuteronomy 20:19-20</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2305-08532016000400008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Humanity's day to day activities are currently impacting on the natural environment in a way unknown before. Although the destruction of natural resources in times of war is prohibited by the Geneva Conventions, it is currently also happening during periods of peace. The reason for this is the undisputed right to life that humans appropriate themselves regardless of the impact of their acts on the environment. According to Deuteronomy 20 all human life is not of equal value and not necessarily superior to life in nature. Deuteronomy 20 challenges conventional thinking on the subject of human-nature relationships. It is also challenged in Jewish Halachic thinking, the practicality of primitive Eskimo's attitude towards life and nature, as well as Assyrian acts during war. In these societies the dependence of humans on nature in order to ensure survival, was acknowledged. Currently a paradigm shift away from the anthropocentric attitude towards nature is needed to accommodate the conviction that functionality and potentiality should form part of our philosophy concerning the right to life. A new set of moral rules should be established, taking into account the fact that an endeavour to prolong human life indefinitely should not be desirable because it is to the detriment of nature and thus to humanity itself. <![CDATA[<b>Verbond</b><b>, geloof en geloofservaring</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2305-08532016000400009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Humanity's day to day activities are currently impacting on the natural environment in a way unknown before. Although the destruction of natural resources in times of war is prohibited by the Geneva Conventions, it is currently also happening during periods of peace. The reason for this is the undisputed right to life that humans appropriate themselves regardless of the impact of their acts on the environment. According to Deuteronomy 20 all human life is not of equal value and not necessarily superior to life in nature. Deuteronomy 20 challenges conventional thinking on the subject of human-nature relationships. It is also challenged in Jewish Halachic thinking, the practicality of primitive Eskimo's attitude towards life and nature, as well as Assyrian acts during war. In these societies the dependence of humans on nature in order to ensure survival, was acknowledged. Currently a paradigm shift away from the anthropocentric attitude towards nature is needed to accommodate the conviction that functionality and potentiality should form part of our philosophy concerning the right to life. A new set of moral rules should be established, taking into account the fact that an endeavour to prolong human life indefinitely should not be desirable because it is to the detriment of nature and thus to humanity itself.