Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Curationis]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2223-627920180001&lang=en vol. 41 num. 1 lang. en <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Caesarean section deliveries: Experiences of mothers of midwifery care at a public hospital in Nelson Mandela Bay</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-62792018000100001&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en BACKGROUND: The rate of caesarean section deliveries has increased globally and mothers are faced with challenges of postoperative recovery and caring thereof. Midwives have a duty to assist these mothers to self-care. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to explore and describe experiences of post-caesarean section delivered mothers of midwifery care at a public hospital in Nelson Mandela Bay. METHODS: A qualitative, descriptive and explorative research design was used in the study. Data were collected from 11 purposively criterion-selected mothers who had a caesarean section delivery. One-on-one semi-structured interviews were conducted in the post-natal wards. Research ethics, namely autonomy, beneficence, justice and informed consent, were adopted in the study. All participants were informed of their right to withdraw from the study at any stage without penalties. Interviews were analysed using Tesch's method of data analysis RESULTS: Three main themes were identified as experiences of: diverse pain, physical limitation and frustration and health care services as different. CONCLUSION: Experiences of mothers following a caesarean section delivery with midwifery services at a public hospital in Nelson Mandela Bay were explored and described as diverse. A need for adequate pain management as well as assistance and breastfeeding support to mothers following caesarean delivery was identified as crucial to promote a good mother-to-child relationship. <![CDATA[<b>Conceptualisation of African primal health care within mental health care</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-62792018000100002&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en BACKGROUND: It is believed by western education systems that the first contact should be with the nurse in primary health care. However, it is not the case. Therefore, the researcher attempts to correct this misconception by conceptualising the correct beginning of health seeking behaviour in an indigenous African community, namely African Primal Health Care (APHC). 'Primal' was coined during a colloquium by Dr Mbulawa and Seboka team members; however no formal conceptualisation took place, only operational definition. Due to the study scope, conceptualisation is narrowed to mental health, but this concept is applicable in the broader health context. The research purpose was to contribute to the body of indigenous knowledge systems to advocate towards co-existence of primal health care and mental health care. AIM: Formulate APHC within a mental health care context. OBJECTIVES: To explore philosophical grounding of APHC and describe epistemology of APHC. To analyse and crystallise the exploration to establish understanding within mental health and conceptualise APHC within mental health care to enhance co-existence. METHODOLOGY: Narrative synthesis, concept analysis (qualitative design). Lekgotla was used as a method of data collection and data were analysed using Leedy and Ormrod's five steps of data analysis. RESULTS: APHC is a health care system that existed in Africa prior to the introduction of the western health care system. It is based on the African belief system and practices. The practices come from the community, for the community and are authenticated by the community. APHC uses a holistic approach and the family and community are involved in the healing process. <![CDATA[<b>A middle-range model for improving quality of nursing education in Malawi</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-62792018000100003&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en BACKGROUND: Despite a global consensus that nurses and midwives constitute the majority and are a backbone of any country's health workforce system, productive capacity of training institutions remains low and still needs more guidance. This study aimed at developing a middle-range model to guide efforts in nursing education improvements. OBJECTIVE: To explore challenges facing nursing education in Malawi and to describe efforts that are being put in place to improve nursing education and the process of development of a model to improve nursing education in Malawi. METHOD: The study used a qualitative descriptive design. A panel discussion with eight nursing education and practice experts was conducted guided by core concepts derived from an analysis of research report from a national nursing education conference. Two focus group discussions during two quarterly review meetings engaged nurse educators, practitioners and clinical preceptors to fill gaps from data obtained from a panel discussion. A qualitative abductive analysis approach was used for the development of the model. RESULTS: Transforming and scaling up of nursing education emerged as the main concept of the model with nursing education context, academic practice partnership, regulation, competent graduate and nursing workforce as sub concepts. Key main strategies in the model included curriculum reforms, regulation, transformative learning, provision of infrastructure and resources and capacity building. CONCLUSION: The model can be used to prioritise nursing education intervention aimed at improving quality of nursing education in Malawi and other similar settings. <![CDATA[<b>The roles, training and knowledge of community health workers about diabetes and hypertension in Khayelitsha, Cape Town</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-62792018000100004&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en BACKGROUND: The current roles and capacity of community health workers (CHWs) in the management and control of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) remain poorly understood. OBJECTIVES: To assess CHWs' current roles, training and knowledge about diabetes and hypertension in Khayelitsha, Cape Town. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 150 CHWs from two non-governmental organisations contracted to provide NCD care as part of a comprehensive package of services was conducted. An interviewer-administered closed-ended questionnaire was used to determine the roles, training, in-service support, knowledge and presence of NCDs. Descriptive analyses of these domains and multivariate analyses of the factors associated with CHWs' knowledge of hypertension and diabetes were conducted. RESULTS: The vast majority (96%) of CHWs were female, with a mean age of 35 years; 88% had some secondary schooling and 53% had been employed as CHWs for 4 years or more. Nearly half (47%) reported having an NCD. CHWs' roles in NCDs included the delivery of medication, providing advice and physical assessment. Only 52% of CHWs reported some formal NCD-related training, while less than half of the trained CHWs (n = 35; 44%) had received follow-up refresher training. CHWs' knowledge of diabetes and hypertension was poor. In the multivariate analyses, higher knowledge scores were associated with having an NCD and frequency of supervisory contact (≥1 per month). CONCLUSIONS: The roles performed by CHWs are broad, varied and essential for diabetes and hypertension management. However, basic knowledge about diabetes and hypertension remains poor while training is unstandardised and haphazard. These need to be improved if community-based NCD management is to be successful. The potential of peer education as a complementary mechanism to formal training needs as well as support and supervision in the workplace requires further exploration. <![CDATA[<b>Barriers to tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus treatment guidelines adherence among nurses initiating and managing anti-retroviral therapy in KwaZulu-Natal and North West provinces</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-62792018000100005&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en BACKGROUND: Nurses, as front-line care providers in the South Africa's health care system, are called upon to deliver integrated interventions for tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus (TB and HIV) including nurse-initiated management of anti-retroviral therapy (NIMART) and anti-TB treatment. Adherence to treatment guidelines and factors associated with non-adherence to treatment guidelines among nurses remain under explored. PURPOSE: To explore and describe barriers to treatment guidelines adherence among nurses initiating and managing anti-retroviral therapy and anti-TB treatment in KwaZulu-Natal and North West provinces. DESIGN: This study employed a qualitative exploratory descriptive design. METHODS: Four semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted during 2014 each consisting of four to eight NIMART trained nurses. Audiotaped interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using Atlas T.I. software. FINDINGS: During data analysis, two themes emerged: (1) NIMART trained nurses' distress about TB and HIV guidelines adherence that is inclusive of lack of agreement with guidelines, poor motivation to implement guidelines, poor clinical support and supervision, resistance to change, insufficient knowledge or lack of awareness and (2) exterior factors inhibiting nurses' adherence to treatment guidelines which incorporated organisational factors, guidelines-related factors and patient-related factors. CONCLUSION: This qualitative study identified that nurses have substantial concerns over guideline adherence. If NIMART trained nurses' barriers inhibiting adherence to treatment guidelines cannot be remedied, patient outcomes may suffer and South Africa will struggle to meet the 90-90-90 targets.