Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Yesterday and Today]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2223-038620110001&lang=pt vol. num. 6 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862011000100001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Welcome note, Conference 2011</b>: <b>Young and modelled by history : What does the future hold?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862011000100002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Overview and Impressions</b>: <b>A short overview of the 2011 SASHT Conference</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862011000100003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Commemorating some milestones of the SASHT and "Yesterday and Today" - a personal perspective</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862011000100004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Youth in history, youth making history</b>: <b>challenging dominant historical narratives for alternative futures</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862011000100005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Women in history textbooks</b>: <b>what message does this send to the youth?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862011000100006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt History textbooks, like all textbooks, play an important role in the facilitation of learning. They act as vehicles by means of which past knowledge legitimated by government and related authorities, as contained in the curriculum, is presented to school-going youth. Textbooks are by nature powerful and authoritative because they are approved by government and other authorities. As a result, school-going youth are likely to consider the way women and men are portrayed in history textbooks as unquestionable and historically truthful. Having reported on findings of empirical studies on women in history textbooks from, amongst others, Taiwan; the United States; the United Kingdom; Russia and South Africa, we conclude that women are underrepresented, misrepresented and marginalised in history textbooks. Women are portrayed as historically unimportant and incapable, contributing little to society outside of the domestic sphere. We furthermore argue that this type of portrayal sends powerful messages to the youth about men and women in history and in contemporary society. <![CDATA[<b>Collecting and organising multimedia components for the development of educational DVDs and multimedia clips for Grade 10 History</b>: <b>the French Revolution - some practical guidelines</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862011000100007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Today's learners are born in a multimedia world and they feel quite comfortable in an electronic learning environment. Therefore South Africa, as the rest of the world, had to respond to the pressure and challenges posed by the information revolution. Although research shows that there is an increase in the availability of computers for teaching and learning, it does not necessary mean a growth in the use and integration of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in the learning and teaching of subjects in South African schools. For Social Sciences it was an unacceptable low 22% in 2000. A lack of resources for use by teachers and learners is indicated as one of the main factors, preventing teachers from using computers in teaching and learning. The educational DVD and multimedia clips can be used as an exciting interactive resource in the integration of multimedia in the Social Sciences classroom when teaching and learning the French Revolution in History, Grade 10. This article gives an overview with some practical guidelines on the process followed in the development and construction of the concept text and also the collecting and organisation of the multimedia components for the DVD and multimedia clips <![CDATA[<b>"The Face of the Future"</b>: <b>Borrowed from Martin Luther King Jr.'s speech before the Youth March for Integrated Schools</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862011000100008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Today's learners are born in a multimedia world and they feel quite comfortable in an electronic learning environment. Therefore South Africa, as the rest of the world, had to respond to the pressure and challenges posed by the information revolution. Although research shows that there is an increase in the availability of computers for teaching and learning, it does not necessary mean a growth in the use and integration of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in the learning and teaching of subjects in South African schools. For Social Sciences it was an unacceptable low 22% in 2000. A lack of resources for use by teachers and learners is indicated as one of the main factors, preventing teachers from using computers in teaching and learning. The educational DVD and multimedia clips can be used as an exciting interactive resource in the integration of multimedia in the Social Sciences classroom when teaching and learning the French Revolution in History, Grade 10. This article gives an overview with some practical guidelines on the process followed in the development and construction of the concept text and also the collecting and organisation of the multimedia components for the DVD and multimedia clips <![CDATA[<b>Remembering "Salisbury Island"</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862011000100009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Three distinct vignettes on "Salisbury Island", have been composed for this discussion on the tribal college for Indians inaugurated in 1961 on Salisbury Island, an old naval base at the Durban Harbour. It was prompted by the reunion that took place in 2011 at the Sibaya Complex outside Durban, as part of the 50th anniversary commemoration of its inauguration. I present diverse aspects of life on Salisbury Island, from different, shifting vantage points and perspectives - combining the banal as well as the critical, rhetorical and historical, autobiographical and discursive - in order to re-create a lost world that was experienced during apartheid, the composition "reflects the syntax of memory itself" [Hirson 2004:134]. Remembering the past in South Africa, especially the apartheid past, re-threads both positive and negative experiences, and weaves a varied quilt of personal, institutional and historical memory. For history educators this would provide a creative and critical way of engaging with the past in order to live in the present. <![CDATA[<b>History as evidential study in teaching of the Holocaust</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862011000100010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This paper will discuss how various programmes support the teaching of the Holocaust through evidence. The Holocaust also provides an ideal backdrop for a study of racism, victimisation and persecution. Mindful of the difficulty of comparing historical events, we nonetheless maintain that of a study of the Holocaust can show the learner evidence of the negative impact of racism, oppression, persecution, prejudice, stereotyping and victimisation in any society. We argue that the study of the Holocaust can encourage the learner to resist racism, discrimination and xenophobia, and develop empathy with the victims of prejudice. In so doing, learners can come to an understanding of their role as active members of the society, and those of others as bystanders or collaborators. We maintain that this aim is defeated when the educator or facilitator fails to provide enough evidence that will elicit empathy, understanding and develop this sense of agency among the learners. History is explored as an evidential study using various sources ranging from primary ones like photographs, artifacts, documents as well as secondary sources. To this end this complex study is brought to life through the use of evidence provided, and the learners learn valuable skills. <![CDATA[<b>South African History Online's Education Programme</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862011000100011&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This paper outlines South African History Online as a NGO that focuses on the enhancement of history especially at school level. The advent of digital and social media platforms has changed the way scholars learn and the way they perceive their world. The book, paper and journals should no longer provide the exclusive model for historical knowledge to be passed on. With this in mind, SAHO has developed a comprehensive online programme that focuses on the current curriculum as laid out by the Department of Education. The development of this website into an online classroom will assist both teachers and learners. Learners should be exposed to the wonders of digitisation and have the advantage of viewing primary source documents in their classrooms. This turns a normal classroom into a virtual archive making the learners instant historians who can now investigate their own case studies. Teachers have the opportunity of telling stories in new ways and in different means, and can use various materials from SAHO's online media and library section to give the learners the opportunity to relive the story. SAHO has various projects such as the development of the online curriculum material and aids for history from Grades 4 to 12. The aim is to build up this project into a comprehensive online encyclopaedia. An Arts and Culture classroom will soon be developed in a similar format. SAHO's teacher outreach programme, online support and e-learning focuses on the development of an online forum for both teachers and learners. Other campaigns include the 'history matters' campaign which is aimed at increasing interest in history at school and tertiary level. Monitoring and evaluating SAHO's classroom support will be done through counters on the web pages. <![CDATA[<b>Viva History Learner's Book Grade 10</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862011000100012&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This paper outlines South African History Online as a NGO that focuses on the enhancement of history especially at school level. The advent of digital and social media platforms has changed the way scholars learn and the way they perceive their world. The book, paper and journals should no longer provide the exclusive model for historical knowledge to be passed on. With this in mind, SAHO has developed a comprehensive online programme that focuses on the current curriculum as laid out by the Department of Education. The development of this website into an online classroom will assist both teachers and learners. Learners should be exposed to the wonders of digitisation and have the advantage of viewing primary source documents in their classrooms. This turns a normal classroom into a virtual archive making the learners instant historians who can now investigate their own case studies. Teachers have the opportunity of telling stories in new ways and in different means, and can use various materials from SAHO's online media and library section to give the learners the opportunity to relive the story. SAHO has various projects such as the development of the online curriculum material and aids for history from Grades 4 to 12. The aim is to build up this project into a comprehensive online encyclopaedia. An Arts and Culture classroom will soon be developed in a similar format. SAHO's teacher outreach programme, online support and e-learning focuses on the development of an online forum for both teachers and learners. Other campaigns include the 'history matters' campaign which is aimed at increasing interest in history at school and tertiary level. Monitoring and evaluating SAHO's classroom support will be done through counters on the web pages.