Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Yesterday and Today]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2223-038620100001&lang=es vol. num. 5 lang. es <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Editorial</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100001&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es <![CDATA[<b>Annual Report</b>: <b>SASHT Chairperson's 2010</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100002&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es <![CDATA[<b>Conference 2010 - Keynote address</b>: <b>the uses of history</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100003&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es <![CDATA[<b>The 15th Annual Society Conference</b>: <b>conference report 2010</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100004&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es <![CDATA[<b>Annual General Meeting SASHT</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100005&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es <![CDATA[<b>The South African Society for History teaching</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100006&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es <![CDATA[<b>Educating the nation about Union</b>: <b>whose heritage?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100007&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es On the 31st of May 2010, South Africa, as a geopolitical creation, had been in existence for a century; a momentous occasion for the country. However, the day passed with little acknowledgement of this event. The question that needs to be asked is why? Surely, the centenary of the geopolitical creation of a country should be commemorated as it is a time to reflect where the country has come from? Thus the focus of this article is the lack of commemoration of Union in 2010 and History Education. The centenary of Union was not commemorated and this phenomenon needs to be unpacked and understood. The Union forms part of the heritage of all South Africans but this it not deemed so by the state. In terms of education, the history of Union will be forgotten as it is not studied and the importance of the creation of South Africa as a geopolitical unit will fall by the waste side. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to unpack the notion of heritage and Union, its exclusion from the National Curriculum Statement (NCS), the non commemoration of its centenary, the significance of Union to society and its recent inclusion into the new Curriculum and Assessment Policy (CAPS) document. <![CDATA[<b>The school as a microcosm of communities and their heritage and the need to encapsulate this in the writing of school histories</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100008&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The writing of school histories is a neglected sub-discipline in the study of heritage. It is, however, imperative that this aspect of the broad tapestry of our local and national heritage is analysed and preserved. As a microcosm of the community which it serves, a school reflects and engages with the greater political, social and economic issues and dynamics at any particular stage in its development. Often relegated to a purely celebratory document marking a centenary, half or quarter century, the account could be purely anecdotal or touch only on those aspects of the school which have contributed to school traditions, neglecting the broader framework within which it functions and with which it engages. It is critical that this aspect of heritage is preserved by historians who take the effort to research and write about this tiny snippet of our national heritage. <![CDATA[<b>Exploring local histories in the use and appreciation of Heritage and History in history curricula</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100009&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es With the Internet so easily available nowadays, I decided (just for the fun of it but also out of curiosity) to do a Google search to see how many entries 1 could find for "heritage and history". In a split second no fewer than 840 000 results appeared. I felt exhausted even before I even started surveying the results. This gives a sense of how history educators must sometimes feel when they have to teach content or facilitate, but still have to find the time on a daily or weekly basis to engage with meaningful ideas and activities as part of the History curriculum. This is especially true for heritage assignments that from 2012 will, among others, be the focus in the Grade 10 History curriculum. In September 2010 the South African Society for History Teaching held its second conference since its founding on the theme of heritage and its inevitable associations with history. As I do not wish to repeat here the theories and practical suggestions which other educators of history with expertise in heritage have recently developed, my focus is more practical. It is practical in the sense that it will motivate educators to use existing content in local histories and local heritage within history curricula frameworks (in all educational phases) to serve as examples of broader trends - apart from this, heritage is also to be appreciated for its own sake as well as acting as a micro anchor and milestone from which broader historical developments evolve. In this regard my focus therefore was more on identifying historical content in past debates and research deliberations with the intention to support educators with content that they can explore inside and outside the formal classroom set-up. Therefore the discussion merely: • Gives glimpses of local history and heritage in the writing of historians and others; • Deals with one local heritage example in the classroom (to connect with the SASHT 2010 conference theme: The "how to of yours, mine and ours in a still divided community; environment"),namely the 2010 Shaka statue dehacle; • Gives some concluding suggestions on heritage, history and the History curriculum <![CDATA[<b>The value of open distance learning (ODL) in assisting history teachers with heritage investigation</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100010&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article highlights some of the challenges facing history teachers in designing and assessing heritage investigation projects in the Further Education and Training (FET) band and the need for teachers to be proactive in terms of their professional development. It also explores ways in which open distance learning (ODL) can address these challenges by providing guidance, encouragement, practical skills training and resource material, especially to those teachers who cannot take their learners to a museum or heritage site for material or logistical reasons. The article is anchored in a qualitative research methodology and reports on student feedback on the Short Course in School History Enrichment offered by the Department of History at the University of South Africa (Unisa) as well as ongoing inquiry into teacher experience of teaching heritage investigation. It also shares the author's personal reflections based on informal communication with course candidates and other teachers over a period of more than ten years. The article argues that ODL can play a significant role in history skills development at secondary school level in general and in enhancing the self-confidence and skills of teachers having to teach heritage investigation in particular. It also emphasises the value of informal partnerships between the ODL institution and role players in the heritage field and makes a plea for closer cooperation between academic historians, history teachers, the Department of Basic Education and the heritage sector. <![CDATA[<b>The value and role of cemeteries</b>: <b>designing a possible methodology for teaching heritage to history learners</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100011&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Teaching heritage to History learners is imperative as an aid to help them discover their uniqueness but also their commonalities. A sense of heritage does not only contribute to a feeling of belonging and identity, but also promotes social cohesion, mutual understanding and unity in a multi-cultural, multi-national country. Due to its perceived value, heritage as a theme is recognised as one of the knowledge focuses for History as prescribed in the National Curriculum Statement. However, for various reasons, heritage does not receive the attention in the teaching and learning of History it deserves. By concentrating on the value and role of cemeteries, the purpose of this article is to provide History teachers with a step-by-step methodology in support of the effective teaching of heritage. <![CDATA[<b>Setting up a school museum</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100012&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The creation of a school museum offers an opportunity for a school and its broader community to celebrate the institution's no doubt unique history and heritage, and to offer an "open book to the world" of its history, contribution to society and its character. Whilst professional museum planners might be employed to take on the task of managing the overall project and tackling the rather daunting list of "To Do's", their services are expensive, and might cause a school's Governing Body to balk at the anticipated costs. In this article, Pietermaritzburg teacher, Matthew Marwick, summarises the journey undertaken by the members of the Museum Planning Committee at Maritzburg College, as they upgrade the school's existing museum, which currently is primarily made up of ad hoc displays of photos and memorabilia, in the build-up to the school's 150th celebrations in 2013. In the article, he points out some of the difficulties already experienced during this venture (which is ongoing), and offers practical advice to educators who might be considering a similar undertaking. <![CDATA[<b>'The power of power'</b>: <b>power stations as industrial heritage and their place in history and heritage education</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100013&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article focuses on the Electrical Precinct in Newtown as an example of industrial heritage in the centre of Johannesburg. The author makes the case that industrial heritage has been neglected in terms of what is deemed to be culturally significant. Yet industrial landscapes provide a direct connection with a 'cultural 'experience common to all city dwellers. The author demonstrates how the heritage tourism company, Cultural Encounters, used field trips/visits to Newtown with learners from Grades 8-12, over the period 2003- 2009, to grapple with the requirements of the Social Sciences and History curricula. She argues that this approach to industrial heritage could provide a radical new approach to the 2010 Curriculum Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS), including the Grade 10 heritage assignment. <![CDATA[<b>Trans-European convergences in national textbooks for history education? An approach to the comparison of image sources in schoolbooks</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100014&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es According to findings of textbook analyses since 2004 all across Europe, students encounter a group of about 15 historical paintings and historical photographs in their history textbooks which are shown more often than average. This article will introduce this corpus and analyse those popular pictures according to historical-didactical standards. The questions of implicit historical theories as well as the proportion of national history and European education thereby seem to be especially important. <![CDATA[<b>The portfolio as an authentic assessment tool for learning</b>: <b>is it serving its purpose?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100015&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article focuses on the utilisation of the learner portfolio in the learning area Social Sciences as an alternative, authentic assessment tool to demonstrate the performance, progress and growth of learners in relation to the expected learning outcomes. The purpose of the portfolio, namely to promote learning, is not disputed, but the question is whether this assessment tool is really being used to its best advantage, and if not, why not. An attempt is made in this article to shed light on the apparent under-utilisation of learner portfolios. Although the use of portfolios is widely commended, the purpose of this assessment tool is not being realised in practice. This begs the question: why use a portfolio if it is not optimally utilised? <![CDATA[<b>What's in a monument? The importance of context</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100016&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article focuses on the utilisation of the learner portfolio in the learning area Social Sciences as an alternative, authentic assessment tool to demonstrate the performance, progress and growth of learners in relation to the expected learning outcomes. The purpose of the portfolio, namely to promote learning, is not disputed, but the question is whether this assessment tool is really being used to its best advantage, and if not, why not. An attempt is made in this article to shed light on the apparent under-utilisation of learner portfolios. Although the use of portfolios is widely commended, the purpose of this assessment tool is not being realised in practice. This begs the question: why use a portfolio if it is not optimally utilised? <![CDATA[<b>Getting your hands dirty</b>: <b>history fieldwork</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100017&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article focuses on the utilisation of the learner portfolio in the learning area Social Sciences as an alternative, authentic assessment tool to demonstrate the performance, progress and growth of learners in relation to the expected learning outcomes. The purpose of the portfolio, namely to promote learning, is not disputed, but the question is whether this assessment tool is really being used to its best advantage, and if not, why not. An attempt is made in this article to shed light on the apparent under-utilisation of learner portfolios. Although the use of portfolios is widely commended, the purpose of this assessment tool is not being realised in practice. This begs the question: why use a portfolio if it is not optimally utilised? <![CDATA[<b>The holocaust industry</b>: <b>reflections on the exploitation of Jewish suffering</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100018&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article focuses on the utilisation of the learner portfolio in the learning area Social Sciences as an alternative, authentic assessment tool to demonstrate the performance, progress and growth of learners in relation to the expected learning outcomes. The purpose of the portfolio, namely to promote learning, is not disputed, but the question is whether this assessment tool is really being used to its best advantage, and if not, why not. An attempt is made in this article to shed light on the apparent under-utilisation of learner portfolios. Although the use of portfolios is widely commended, the purpose of this assessment tool is not being realised in practice. This begs the question: why use a portfolio if it is not optimally utilised? <![CDATA[<b>Rabble Rouser for Peace</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862010000100019&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article focuses on the utilisation of the learner portfolio in the learning area Social Sciences as an alternative, authentic assessment tool to demonstrate the performance, progress and growth of learners in relation to the expected learning outcomes. The purpose of the portfolio, namely to promote learning, is not disputed, but the question is whether this assessment tool is really being used to its best advantage, and if not, why not. An attempt is made in this article to shed light on the apparent under-utilisation of learner portfolios. Although the use of portfolios is widely commended, the purpose of this assessment tool is not being realised in practice. This begs the question: why use a portfolio if it is not optimally utilised?