Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Yesterday and Today]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2223-038620220002&lang=en vol. num. 28 lang. en <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Editorial</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862022000200001&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en <![CDATA[<b>A festschrift dedicated to Pieter Warnich - My mentor in so many ways</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862022000200002&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en <![CDATA[<b>Peter Seixas -1947-2022</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862022000200003&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en <![CDATA[<b>The Pandemic History Classroom: grouping or groping the digital divide</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862022000200004&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article is concerned with the impact of Covid-19 on the higher education sector. It examines the impact of group work in the discipline ofhistory in remote university teaching and learning set in the context of Covid-19 imposed lockdowns in South Africa. When the pandemic broke out, few were prepared for its worst excesses in terms of lives lost impact on health facilities, economies and higher education. Lockdowns to limit the pandemic's spread were imposed in many countries worldwide, limiting in-person interaction, which affected various aspects of human contact, not least in university education. Taken away from campuses, universities in South Africa, as elsewhere, were forced not only to adapt to online teaching but to be inventive in the methods used to retain student participation and engagement. While technology was heralded as the solution to the global crisis in teaching, other concerns affect the well-being of students that also require attention. By using the research conducted with staff and students in history modules at one South African university, this article considers the pandemic classroom with its online and remote mode of instruction. It takes specific cognisance of what is lost due to this form of engagement in terms of isolation's psychological and emotional impact on students in the tertiary education sector. Within this context, it assesses whether the use of group work within a university environment and, in particular, the discipline of history, is a possible means to try and bridge this digital divide or if this option is merely a case of groping in the digital ditch. <![CDATA[<b>Knowledge for the people: Understanding the complex heritage of colonial education in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862022000200005&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The decolonisation of education seems to require a clear understanding of the colonial education heritage in South Africa and an understanding of the emergent global trends that shaped policy and practice from the 19th century. This paper explores the origins of educational discourses and practices that emerged in England and formed the basis of colonial practices. It focuses on emergent policies aimed at educating the working classes in the industrial heartland, which came to influence the literate or scientific culture in the Cape during that time. It explores the hitherto neglected issue of the ideas and resources deployed in both contexts, with particular reference to printed materials that shaped that culture in the process of framing a secular and scientific culture in schools and popular culture of literacy amongst working-class people in the metropolis and African subject/ citizens in the colonial context. It also traces gradual attempts to introduce a culture of literacy which embraced the African language and culture. These educational developments related to children's schooling and the popular education of adults helped shape the state-controlled mass education system that emerged during the 20th century. This paper aims to begin an exploration of the complex dynamics of that process and open the way for further research on these neglected issues. <![CDATA[<b>Teaching history in primary schools in Mauritius: Reflections on history teachers' pedagogical practices</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862022000200006&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Although post-independent Mauritius has witnessed the evolution of the history curriculum, the discipline has still not been accorded the status as in some countries in Europe and Africa. The evolution also marks change and continuity in the content of the history curriculum and how the teaching is transacted in classrooms. This paper informs on the current state of teaching history in primary schools in Mauritius. An interpretivist qualitative methodological approach was adopted to understand the pedagogical choices made by teachers in the implementation of the history curriculum in primary classrooms. Data was generated through classroom observations and interviews with 15 primary school history teachers. Findings reveal the need to draw on a range of knowledge to engage learners successfully in history classes. This range of knowledge they need to draw is extensive and complex. The study shows that teachers' knowledge base is crucial for effective history teaching in classrooms. <![CDATA[<b>Stakeholders' appraisals of the school history curriculum in Zambia on social media</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862022000200007&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This study attempted to capture stakeholders' views on the school history curriculum in Zambia. Stakeholders' views are an important aspect of curriculum development. Social media such as Facebook and WhatsApp have become platforms a section of Zambians uses to challenge the traditional education system. The study used a qualitative approach design by monitoring the e-comments of focus groups (teachers' forums) and individuals on Facebook on what some Zambians thought about the history curriculum. Social media was used because it provides an environment that removes traditional inhibitions of authority figures and meets people in their comfort zone, making them free to discuss otherwise sensitive topics. This research revealed that various stakeholders found the curriculum content irrelevant to the future they envisioned for themselves. The study additionally found that people in Zambia had been side-lined in discussions concerning curriculum development for history. People felt that they had been placed into the straitlaced role of consumers, and their feedback has never been sought. The study recommends revisiting the school history curriculum content to reflect stakeholders' needs and apply it to society. Curriculum developers should also pay attention to the voices of stakeholders in society. <![CDATA[<b>Conference Report: The 36th South African Society for History Teaching (SASHT) Conference 29-30 September 2022</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862022000200008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This study attempted to capture stakeholders' views on the school history curriculum in Zambia. Stakeholders' views are an important aspect of curriculum development. Social media such as Facebook and WhatsApp have become platforms a section of Zambians uses to challenge the traditional education system. The study used a qualitative approach design by monitoring the e-comments of focus groups (teachers' forums) and individuals on Facebook on what some Zambians thought about the history curriculum. Social media was used because it provides an environment that removes traditional inhibitions of authority figures and meets people in their comfort zone, making them free to discuss otherwise sensitive topics. This research revealed that various stakeholders found the curriculum content irrelevant to the future they envisioned for themselves. The study additionally found that people in Zambia had been side-lined in discussions concerning curriculum development for history. People felt that they had been placed into the straitlaced role of consumers, and their feedback has never been sought. The study recommends revisiting the school history curriculum content to reflect stakeholders' needs and apply it to society. Curriculum developers should also pay attention to the voices of stakeholders in society. <![CDATA[<b>Teaching soft skills in the modern history classroom beyond the parameters of the formal school curriculum</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862022000200009&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This study attempted to capture stakeholders' views on the school history curriculum in Zambia. Stakeholders' views are an important aspect of curriculum development. Social media such as Facebook and WhatsApp have become platforms a section of Zambians uses to challenge the traditional education system. The study used a qualitative approach design by monitoring the e-comments of focus groups (teachers' forums) and individuals on Facebook on what some Zambians thought about the history curriculum. Social media was used because it provides an environment that removes traditional inhibitions of authority figures and meets people in their comfort zone, making them free to discuss otherwise sensitive topics. This research revealed that various stakeholders found the curriculum content irrelevant to the future they envisioned for themselves. The study additionally found that people in Zambia had been side-lined in discussions concerning curriculum development for history. People felt that they had been placed into the straitlaced role of consumers, and their feedback has never been sought. The study recommends revisiting the school history curriculum content to reflect stakeholders' needs and apply it to society. Curriculum developers should also pay attention to the voices of stakeholders in society. <![CDATA[<b>Teaching for belonging: a course facilitating global pluralism, and dialogue</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862022000200010&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This study attempted to capture stakeholders' views on the school history curriculum in Zambia. Stakeholders' views are an important aspect of curriculum development. Social media such as Facebook and WhatsApp have become platforms a section of Zambians uses to challenge the traditional education system. The study used a qualitative approach design by monitoring the e-comments of focus groups (teachers' forums) and individuals on Facebook on what some Zambians thought about the history curriculum. Social media was used because it provides an environment that removes traditional inhibitions of authority figures and meets people in their comfort zone, making them free to discuss otherwise sensitive topics. This research revealed that various stakeholders found the curriculum content irrelevant to the future they envisioned for themselves. The study additionally found that people in Zambia had been side-lined in discussions concerning curriculum development for history. People felt that they had been placed into the straitlaced role of consumers, and their feedback has never been sought. The study recommends revisiting the school history curriculum content to reflect stakeholders' needs and apply it to society. Curriculum developers should also pay attention to the voices of stakeholders in society. <![CDATA[<b>History Teaching in and beyond the formal curriculum Two Students Looking Back and Looking Forward</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862022000200011&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This study attempted to capture stakeholders' views on the school history curriculum in Zambia. Stakeholders' views are an important aspect of curriculum development. Social media such as Facebook and WhatsApp have become platforms a section of Zambians uses to challenge the traditional education system. The study used a qualitative approach design by monitoring the e-comments of focus groups (teachers' forums) and individuals on Facebook on what some Zambians thought about the history curriculum. Social media was used because it provides an environment that removes traditional inhibitions of authority figures and meets people in their comfort zone, making them free to discuss otherwise sensitive topics. This research revealed that various stakeholders found the curriculum content irrelevant to the future they envisioned for themselves. The study additionally found that people in Zambia had been side-lined in discussions concerning curriculum development for history. People felt that they had been placed into the straitlaced role of consumers, and their feedback has never been sought. The study recommends revisiting the school history curriculum content to reflect stakeholders' needs and apply it to society. Curriculum developers should also pay attention to the voices of stakeholders in society. <![CDATA[<b>Challenges related to the Zambian history curriculum and how the history school curriculum can be decolonised</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862022000200012&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This study attempted to capture stakeholders' views on the school history curriculum in Zambia. Stakeholders' views are an important aspect of curriculum development. Social media such as Facebook and WhatsApp have become platforms a section of Zambians uses to challenge the traditional education system. The study used a qualitative approach design by monitoring the e-comments of focus groups (teachers' forums) and individuals on Facebook on what some Zambians thought about the history curriculum. Social media was used because it provides an environment that removes traditional inhibitions of authority figures and meets people in their comfort zone, making them free to discuss otherwise sensitive topics. This research revealed that various stakeholders found the curriculum content irrelevant to the future they envisioned for themselves. The study additionally found that people in Zambia had been side-lined in discussions concerning curriculum development for history. People felt that they had been placed into the straitlaced role of consumers, and their feedback has never been sought. The study recommends revisiting the school history curriculum content to reflect stakeholders' needs and apply it to society. Curriculum developers should also pay attention to the voices of stakeholders in society. <![CDATA[<b>A Breed Apart</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2223-03862022000200013&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This study attempted to capture stakeholders' views on the school history curriculum in Zambia. Stakeholders' views are an important aspect of curriculum development. Social media such as Facebook and WhatsApp have become platforms a section of Zambians uses to challenge the traditional education system. The study used a qualitative approach design by monitoring the e-comments of focus groups (teachers' forums) and individuals on Facebook on what some Zambians thought about the history curriculum. Social media was used because it provides an environment that removes traditional inhibitions of authority figures and meets people in their comfort zone, making them free to discuss otherwise sensitive topics. This research revealed that various stakeholders found the curriculum content irrelevant to the future they envisioned for themselves. The study additionally found that people in Zambia had been side-lined in discussions concerning curriculum development for history. People felt that they had been placed into the straitlaced role of consumers, and their feedback has never been sought. The study recommends revisiting the school history curriculum content to reflect stakeholders' needs and apply it to society. Curriculum developers should also pay attention to the voices of stakeholders in society.