Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Journal of Economic and Management Sciences ]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2222-343620190001&lang=en vol. 22 num. 1 lang. en <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Pricing of fair value instruments reported under International Financial Reporting Standards 7: South African setting</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2222-34362019000100001&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en BACKGROUND: Prior literature established that different fair value levels disclosed in terms of the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) 7 are value relevant. SETTING: This study investigates the market pricing of the different fair value levels, as well as the market reaction towards the fair value hierarchy levels reported in terms of IFRS 7. AIM: Prior research found inconsistencies in the market pricing of fair value levels. This study seeks to contribute to this debate. It also focuses on the period after comprehensive guidance on how to measure fair value levels was issued. METHODS: Data from 2009 to 2015 were collected from the financial sector companies listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange. The study uses the statement of financial position and the Ohlson model to investigate the market pricing of the different fair value levels disclosed in terms of IFRS 7. RESULTS: The results of the study show that the fair value of assets level 1, 2 and 3, as well as the fair value of liabilities level 3 are value relevant while the fair value of liabilities level 1 and 2 are not value relevant. Furthermore, the market pricing of level 2 and 3 fair value assets and liabilities is not lower for companies with a high debt equity ratio than for companies with a low debt equity ratio. The results further reveal that the pricing of level 3 assets improved with the introduction of IFRS 13 and post the 2008 financial crisis. CONCLUSION: Fair value assets across different hierarchy levels are value relevant. On the contrary, fair value liabilities are priced differently across the different hierarchy levels. <![CDATA[<b>Using explicit knowledge of groups to enhance firm productivity: A data envelopment analysis application</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2222-34362019000100002&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en BACKGROUND: The telecommunication industry is globally recognised to be a knowledge-intensive industry where high levels of technological sophistication are a key determinant of success and performance. Consequently, existing research has examined the role of labour hours and the firm's capital on productivity. Nonetheless, research is yet to relate, with empirical evidence, productivity gains that accrue to organisations as a direct function of knowledge work and knowledge workers, especially with respect to group-explicit knowledge usage in emerging economies such as Nigeria. The adoption of data envelopment analysis further provides originality in the area of benchmarking group-explicit knowledge in telecommunication firms to enhance productivity. As such, this research takes on a scientific investigation to fill this gap. AIM: The purpose of this research work was to determine the influence of group-explicit knowledge on the productivity of telecommunication organisations. SETTING: The setting of this research is composed of the four leading telecommunication firms in Nigeria and their customer service centres METHODS: Based on a sample size of 42 customer service centres of the four most active global system for mobile communications organisations in Lagos state and Federal Capital Territory (FCT), Nigeria, the research adopted the output-oriented data envelopment analysis model to show the influence of group-explicit knowledge on productivity. RESULTS: The results showed that 15 decision-making units (DMUs) (representing 36%) were found to be technically efficient using the constant return to scale approach, while only 12 DMUs (representing about 28.6%), based on variable return to scale approach, were found to productively engage their present input resources in outputs that achieve optimal productivity for the firm. CONCLUSION: Group-explicit knowledge dimensions that were investigated in this study significantly influence productivity of firms in Nigeria's telecommunication industry. It was recommended that DMUs that were identified to be productivity deficient should hold resources input constant while their employees made efforts to scale up operations to enhance productivity. <![CDATA[<b>The performance of debt and equity markets in Anglo American Plc and BHP Billiton Plc in the period 2006 to 2015 through the lens of Merton's structural model</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2222-34362019000100003&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article applies the Merton structural model in evaluating the performance of the debt and equity markets in Anglo American Plc and BHP Billiton Plc in the period 2006 to 2015. We consider statistical and economic measures of the efficacy of the Merton model in explaining observed market behaviour. We find strong but unstable statistical support for the Merton model as a descriptor of market behaviour. We generated superior risk adjusted returns when applying the results of our analysis to an investment strategy. Market prices deviate from model behaviour; however, the relationship appears to be mean reverting which supports the investment thesis. <![CDATA[<b>Good capitalism versus bad capitalism: A review</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2222-34362019000100004&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article applies the Merton structural model in evaluating the performance of the debt and equity markets in Anglo American Plc and BHP Billiton Plc in the period 2006 to 2015. We consider statistical and economic measures of the efficacy of the Merton model in explaining observed market behaviour. We find strong but unstable statistical support for the Merton model as a descriptor of market behaviour. We generated superior risk adjusted returns when applying the results of our analysis to an investment strategy. Market prices deviate from model behaviour; however, the relationship appears to be mean reverting which supports the investment thesis. <![CDATA[<b>A high unemployment and labour market segmentation: A three-segment macroeconomic model</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2222-34362019000100005&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en BACKGROUND: South Africa suffers from an unusually high unemployment rate - officially averaging 25% since 1999Q3. In addition, depending on whether one uses the official or broad definitions of unemployment, since 2008 there are on average between 2 and 3.3 times as many unemployed people as there are people in the informal sector. Hence the question: why do the unemployed not enter the informal sector to create a livelihood? AIM: To fill this gap we propose a macro-economic framework that incorporates both formal (primary) and informal (secondary) sectors, as well as involuntary unemployment resulting from entry barriers to the labour market. We believe such a model provides a more suitable basis for macroeconomic policy analysis. SETTING: Standard macroeconomic theories at best provide a partial explanation for the South African unemployment problem, focusing mostly on the formal sector. METHODS: The article uses a theoretical analysis. RESULTS: The article presents a macro-economic framework that incorporates both formal (primary) and informal (secondary) sectors, as well as involuntary unemployment resulting from entry barriers to the labour market. CONCLUSION: If the assumptions on which the model draws hold in the South African reality, then a solution to the unem-ployment problem involve policies addressing product and labour market structures and behaviour in the primary sector, as well as policies addressing the numerous barriers to entry, such as borrowing constraints, that poten-tial entrants into the secondary sector face. <![CDATA[<b>The unemployed and the formal and informal sectors in South Africa: A macroeconomic analysis</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2222-34362019000100006&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en BACKGROUND: At 27.2% in the second quarter of 2018 the official unemployment rate in South Africa ranks as one of the highest in the world. However, depending on whether one uses the official or broad definition of unemployed, since 2008 there are on average between 2 and 3.3 times as many unemployed people as there are people in the informal sector. AIM: This article seeks to explore empirically, using time-series data, the extent to which an increase in the number of unemployed leads to increased entry of workers into the informal sector. METHOD: We use a Markov-switching vector error correction model. RESULTS: We find that such entrance is very limited, lending credence to the notion that significant entry barriers exist into the informal sector CONCLUSION: From a policy point of view these results suggest the need to consider measures that will ease entrance into the informal sector. <![CDATA[<b>The effect of work engagement on total quality management practices in a petrochemical organisation</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2222-34362019000100007&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en BACKGROUND: Work engagement can be defined as a positive, fulfilling, work-related state of mind that is characterised by Vigour, Dedication and Absorption. There is a general belief that there is a connection between work engagement and business results, as well as total quality. Practitioners and academics have over the years agreed that the consequences of work engagement are positive. Total quality management is an essential practice that can be used to improve the quality of products on a systematic basis to meet customer satisfaction. It is important for an organisation to have engaged employees as it is evident that such an organisation is likely to prosper and attain total quality management (TQM). AIM: The main objective of the study was to determine the effect of work engagement on total quality management practices in a petrochemical organisation. SETTING: The study was carried out in the petrochemical industry, which is of economic significance to the country. The degree of work engagement is essential for sustainable performance in this industry METHODS: Two questionnaires were used for the study, namely the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale and TQM. A total of 166 of responses were received from employees working for a petrochemical organisation. RESULTS: Overall, the results showed that work engagement had a positive relationship with the dimensions of TQM, which was used as a measure of quality, which is a non-financial measure of performance CONCLUSION: Managers need to enable an organisation to attract, develop and retain highly engaged employees to ensure a sustainable competitive advantage.