Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Educational Research for Social Change]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2221-407020180003&lang=pt vol. 7 num. 2 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Editorial</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702018000300001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Trends and patterns in the use of grounded theory in educational research in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702018000300002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The calls for the decolonisation of knowledge in South Africa is a challenge that educational researchers cannot ignore. The problem is, however, that research and knowledge development traditions in education have not contributed in significant ways to enhancing cognitive justice in society. The focus of this article is on grounded theory, a research methodology tradition that is assumed to be relevant and valuable to the possibilities of transformational changes in education because it allows, by design, for research that produces theories in ways that are inductive, data based, and bottom-up. The purpose is to review research in education in South Africa, since 1994, and to identify trends and patterns in order to understand how grounded theory methods contribute to the development of new education theories and to transformation. We have reviewed articles published during the period 1994-2016 and found that they cover different academic domains. We also found that the majority of studies utilised grounded theory methodology meticulously and with varied levels of sophistication, leading to around one third of the studies articulating theories in the comprehensive sense of the word. The findings are discussed with reference to the role of educational research in the changing times of decolonisation. Recommendations are made to improve educational research: to be more relevant and transformative. <![CDATA[<b>A critical look at a technologically sophisticated initiative to address the problem of unequal educational opportunities in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702018000300003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt A survey of the literature in connection with the current state of education in South Africa reveals a consensus that the system has remained unfair to a large section of the population, even now-two decades into the postapartheid dispensation. The education system has now developed two distinct tiers: one for the historically privileged and one for historically disadvantaged learners, the latter by far the larger of the two. In addition to measures taken by the Department of Basic Education to close the gap between these two tiers, some of the historically privileged schools have launched initiatives to help their less fortunate counterparts overcome the disparities and unfairness of the current system. This paper takes a critical look at one such initiative, a project that is technologically sophisticated and from which all historically disadvantaged schools may potentially benefit. Although the project has been well meant by its initiators, and although it already has benefited some 38 underprivileged schools since 2008, it is a stark illustration of the persistent disparities in the South African education system. The project nevertheless has transformative potential. <![CDATA[<b>Immigrant children's geographies of schooling experiences in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702018000300004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The aim of this research was to explore the schooling experiences of academically high-functioning immigrant learners in the province of KwaZulu-Natal. The participants were six female immigrant learners (age range: 13-18 years) in Grades 8 to 11. The research tradition was narrative inquiry. Data generation involved open-ended interviews and a participatory research technique, photovoice. The findings revealed the resiliency and agency of the young learners as they navigate schooling in South Africa. It was apparent that they took on a positive stance despite the struggles they have experienced in the host country, including language and cultural barriers, social isolation and exclusion, and bullying and discrimination that heightened their vulnerability in schooling spaces. The study revealed their strong sense of self-efficacy, responsibility and self-discipline, determination to succeed, commitment to their studies, and to make the best of valued opportunities in South Africa. Social capital emerged as a key protective influence that shaped the schooling experiences of the learners. <![CDATA[<b>Perceptions of immigrant Nigerian women in South African Higher Education about social change</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702018000300005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The focus of this article is immigrant women's perceptions of social change, and how they respond to it. In the article, social change refers to the fact that more people than ever before are engaged in different activities that lead to alterations in the norms and behavioural patterns of people as individuals or as a group in society. The study analysed social change via the perceptions of individuals-immigrant Nigerian women in South African higher education. In line with phenomenological research with which this article is aligned, an intrinsic qualitative case study approach-interviews-was employed to gather data. The cases involved four Nigerian women who are currently residing in South Africa and studying at higher education institutions in the country. Snowball sampling was used to select participants. Social change, as revealed in this article, is a lens that can be used to better understand individuals as a society or people. Furthermore, and in terms of materialist social theory that was utilised, this article reveals that social change relates to economic relationships between self (individuals or group) and society where survival of people is linked to surplus economic goods and the acquisition of tangible and intangible wants in order to deal with the fear of an unknown future. The article concludes that the understanding of self as a fallout of social change is a means of understanding others and vice versa, which can help people-especially locals or indigenes-conquer their fear of foreigners or immigrants. <![CDATA[<b>Engaging critical emancipatory research as an alternative to mitigate school violence in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702018000300006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt In this theoretical paper, we contribute to ongoing narratives that attempt to mitigate and curb school violence. We do this by critiquing school relations through the lens of critical emancipatory research. Critical emancipatory research has the impetus to map skewed relations that exacerbate school violence in South African schools. In order to achieve our aim, we highlight various principles of critical emancipatory research that position the theory so that it relates to rebuilding school safety to achieve better schools for all stakeholders. The principles of social justice and social transformation, and the necessity to eliminate false consciousness, are discussed as critical elements of mitigating school violence. The article argues that critical emancipatory research, when it is used to frame relationships within the school milieu, has the impetus to forge new dimensions of, and responses to, conflict resolution-and to lessen school violence. <![CDATA[<b>Men's perceived powers to destroy or rebuild women's lives: Analysis of gender stereotypes portrayed in <i>Uthando Lungumanqoba</i></b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702018000300007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article is aimed at challenging gender stereotypes portraying men as a powerful species that can either destroy or build the lives of women. Using the critical approach to literature called feminist literary criticism, which embraces pluralism of feminist ideologies, this investigation depicts how gender stereotypes and the abuse of women nearly destroyed the life of a young girl in an isiZulu novel titled Uthando Lungumanqoba [Love Conquers All], by Maphili Shange. This woman author allows the character of Phindile, a young girl who lost both her parents at the age of 17, to be rescued from the clutches of poverty and prostitution by a man named Thulani-which shows how gender stereotypes have equally infested the psyches of both men and women. <![CDATA[<b>Vulnerable femininities: Implications for rural girls' schooling experiences in Swaziland</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702018000300008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This paper draws on social constructionism to explore girls' constructions of gender within three rural primary schools in Swaziland. HIV and AIDS in Swaziland have resulted in an unprecedented number of parental deaths, rendering young children, especially girls, susceptible to poverty, various forms of gender-based violence, and unwanted pregnancies. The paper sought to understand the ways in which these girls actively perform gender to navigate challenges associated with schooling within highly patriarchal contexts, and the implications of these on gender equality and the girls' social and academic wellbeing. A qualitative narrative inquiry methodology was adopted, utilising individual and focus group interviews and participatory photovoice for data generation. The participants comprised of 15 purposively selected girls, aged between 12 and 16 years. The paper contributes to the ongoing debates on gender by raising consciousness of how understanding and addressing the schooling plight of girls (as a diverse social group) could be a useful strategy for social change and improved gender equitable relationships in schools. <![CDATA[<b>Using students' experiences of lectures as a lens for learning about teaching pre-service teachers: A methodological approach to transformative practice through self-study</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702018000300009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Few higher education institutions have training or induction programmes that prepare academics to teach pre-service teachers. How can academics develop and ascertain teaching practices that are appropriate and effective for teaching pre-service teachers? In this self-study, I used Brookfield's four lenses to inform my teaching. Together with a critical friend, I used the community of practice theory and the metaphors of boundary crossing and boundary objects to interrogate my teaching and students' learning using students' experiences as the stimulus for reflection. Findings from this study revealed that pre-service teachers take on multiple identities of teacher, learner, and university student during teaching and learning activities that influence what they learn. The study showed that the pedagogical choices teacher educators make can hinder meaningful learning if they are not aligned to students' identities. The study also showed that investigating and critically reflecting on students' experiences of lectures can be an effective methodological approach for identifying and understanding effective practices for teaching and preparing pre-service teachers. The article concludes by arguing and advocating for teacher educators, as experts in a community of practice, to decolonise their classrooms by making them safe spaces for critical dialogue that allows students' voices and experiences to be heard. Such a practice has the potential to create a community of practice that is characterised by shared knowledge, values, and standards. <![CDATA[<b>Green sprouts: Transformative learning in learning through participation (LTP)</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702018000300010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article explores the transformative learning effects of university courses that integrate academic learning with practical experience, highlighting in particular the tripartite learning that may occur where students are encouraged to work collaboratively with external partners as well as with their university teachers. We make the proposition that the student can act as the catalyst for this emancipatory perspective, and that critical reflection is necessary to achieve this outcome. Finally, we propose a four-step model that can be used by students, their teachers, and placement supervisors to scaffold the critical reflection process during an experiential learning placement. <![CDATA[<b>Responsible research practice: Revisiting transformative paradigm in social research by Norma R. A. Romm</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702018000300011&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article explores the transformative learning effects of university courses that integrate academic learning with practical experience, highlighting in particular the tripartite learning that may occur where students are encouraged to work collaboratively with external partners as well as with their university teachers. We make the proposition that the student can act as the catalyst for this emancipatory perspective, and that critical reflection is necessary to achieve this outcome. Finally, we propose a four-step model that can be used by students, their teachers, and placement supervisors to scaffold the critical reflection process during an experiential learning placement. <![CDATA[<b>Life history, identity construction and life ambitions of Basotho herders</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702018000300012&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article explores the transformative learning effects of university courses that integrate academic learning with practical experience, highlighting in particular the tripartite learning that may occur where students are encouraged to work collaboratively with external partners as well as with their university teachers. We make the proposition that the student can act as the catalyst for this emancipatory perspective, and that critical reflection is necessary to achieve this outcome. Finally, we propose a four-step model that can be used by students, their teachers, and placement supervisors to scaffold the critical reflection process during an experiential learning placement.