Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Educational Research for Social Change]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2221-407020170001&lang=en vol. 6 num. 1 lang. en <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>What makes educational research "African"?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702017000100001&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en <![CDATA[<b>Transformation and change in knowledge generation paradigms in the African and global contexts: implications for education research in the 21st century</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702017000100002&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en There are many things that education and development in Africa was supposed to be about, but which it is still not. To many critical readers, education has stood by, "eyeless in Gaza" (Milton, 1667-1671, l. 41), unable to find the words and strategies deep enough to deal with epistemological disenfranchisement and cognitive justice with untold consequences for the development of the "whole person" in Africa. When it has engaged with "development," education either encourages blind assimilation into it, or it proposes ameliorative responses to the effects of development such as over consumption and environmental pollution-or selectively focuses on particular aspects of development such as economic development whilst underplaying or totally ignoring cultural and intercultural education. For its part, development has been rescued from time to time from itself by such humanising prefixes as sustainable, human-centred, and ecological, and so forth. But at its core, its pungent inheritance has yet to be unpacked. Indigenous knowledge systems impel and compel profound rethinking of the actual templates upon which both education and development are premised, and challenge both conceptually, methodologically, and ontologically a new level of action in response to the rebirth of Africa. <![CDATA[<b>Decolonising methodology: who benefits from indigenous knowledge research?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702017000100003&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en It is common for indigenous knowledge (IK) researchers in South Africa to conduct studies within conventional Western paradigms, especially in the field of IK-science curriculum integration. The scientific paradigm usually takes precedence and research publishing follows the rules of the academy. There is an inherent paradox in this practice. An endeavour that aims to redress Western knowledge hegemony and decolonise the school science curriculum often judges its own value in terms of the very system it critiques. While much useful work has been done in IK-science curriculum integration, and calls are made for appreciating both knowledge systems, it is concerning that the research knowledge is available to academics and generally not to indigenous communities who are usually cocontributors (at least) to the research data. This paper argues for research processes and outcomes that could benefit indigenous communities. We present examples drawn from three science curriculum studies in different areas of South Africa. We briefly describe the research contexts, and the ways that the researchers sought to ensure knowledge was shared in relevant representations with each community. We also discuss some of the dilemmas we encountered and offer suggestions for strengthening knowledge dissemination, appreciation, preservation, as well as reimagining IK for new generations. <![CDATA[<b>Towards an African education research methodology: decolonising new knowledge</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702017000100004&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en South Africa has a number of policies to protect and promote indigenous knowledge (IK). The increasing interest in research into indigenous knowledge and science education in southern Africa has led not only to the production of publications, but also to numerous conferences, seminars, research centres, projects, learning materials, and postgraduate courses. However, research methods that are aligned to indigenous knowledge systems (IKS) are yet to develop to the extent that IK policy, publications, and interest groups have. Notwithstanding some authoritative texts (Chilisa, 2012; Odora Hoppers, 2004; Smith, 1999), there is a need for research-based examples from the southern African context that can offer authentic and nuanced suggestions for IK researchers of what an African research methodology might be. In this paper we present a brief overview of arguments for research methods that are consistent with IKS, propose features of such research orientations, and some examples of research processes. We synthesise some of the knowledge we have gained in this field in South Africa and offer considerations and reflections that will contribute to the conversation and exploration of creative, culturally relevant, and ethical ways forward for participative IK research. <![CDATA[<b>Indigenous knowledge/s of survival: implications for lifelong learning among the Basotho herding fraternity</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702017000100005&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article foregrounds Basotho male herders' interaction with their environment as a productive platform for informal learning activities poised to address the herders' immediate and context-specific needs. Indeed, understanding how the herders interact and learn through their daily engagements with their environments has a potential to provide substantive baseline insights that could inform Lesotho's nonformal education providers and policy-making forums. Drawing on indigenous knowledge theory, the article explicates the sociocultural perspective of indigenous knowledge with emphasis on how it is acquired and applied by male Basotho herders in order to improve their lives and address their daily herding challenges. The study adopted a qualitative research methodology with a sample of 30 snowball-selected Basotho male herders using interviews, transect walk, and photo voice as its methods of data collection. The data were analysed using the pattern coding method. The findings revealed two main forms of indigenous knowledge that the herders acquired through the herding practice namely, indigenous knowledge as local science and indigenous knowledge as local practice. The study recommends more scientific research that documents Lesotho's specific indigenous knowledge-to develop a holistic nonformal education curriculum and to nurture the rare indigenous knowledge skills of the Basotho male herders. <![CDATA[<b>"I am because we are" dancing for social change!</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702017000100006&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en In postapartheid South Africa, ideas of self, identity, and one's place in society pose a labyrinth of internal conflict and negotiation. In this article, we discuss the potential of a particular 7-week dance education course, offered to generalist preservice student teachers, as a possible location for self-transformation and, ultimately, social change. Our qualitative case study was rooted in symbolic interactionism, with social interactions becoming catalysts for transforming meanings of self in relation to the other. Participants, mostly nondancers, included 80 culturally diverse preservice student teachers (PSTs) enrolled in a first year bachelor's degree in education (BEd). Students shared personal reflections on their dance education experiences via open-ended questionnaires, focus group interviews, and reflective journals. Our data indicate that the students' dance education experiences generated transformative awareness of the self. This consciousness was primarily evoked by close interactions with diverse others through active, bodily involvement in dance education activities, which prompted more profound engagement with the self, stimulating discovery, liberation, affirmation and, ultimately, transformation of the self. <![CDATA[<b>Positioning a practice of hope in South African teacher education programmes</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702017000100007&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Schools are described as ideal settings for nurturing and fostering children's hopes, and the teaching profession as rooted in hopefulness. However, there is a paucity of research linking hope theory and teacher education in the South African context. Using evidence from my own transformative, visual participatory research with rural South African children on hope and well-being, I argue in this position paper that hope theory, in particular an African perspective of hope, should be positioned alongside discussions on practising an engaged pedagogy to enable teaching practices that are more congruent with an Afrocentric worldview. This article argues a need to infuse relational hope in teacher education practices by encouraging collaborative, participatory learning engagements that create safe and creative spaces for critical dialogue, allowing for multiple voices and experiences to be heard. Such practices could in turn foster a sense of collective hope-characterised by the values of connectedness, caring, and collective agency-thereby equipping student teachers with the tools to build communities of hope in their classrooms and schools. The article concludes with implications of mobilising such a practice of hope through an engaged pedagogy in student teacher education in the South African context. <![CDATA[<b>Africanising the curriculum: indigenous perspectives and theories by Vuyisile Msila and Mishack T. Gumbo (Editors)</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702017000100008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Schools are described as ideal settings for nurturing and fostering children's hopes, and the teaching profession as rooted in hopefulness. However, there is a paucity of research linking hope theory and teacher education in the South African context. Using evidence from my own transformative, visual participatory research with rural South African children on hope and well-being, I argue in this position paper that hope theory, in particular an African perspective of hope, should be positioned alongside discussions on practising an engaged pedagogy to enable teaching practices that are more congruent with an Afrocentric worldview. This article argues a need to infuse relational hope in teacher education practices by encouraging collaborative, participatory learning engagements that create safe and creative spaces for critical dialogue, allowing for multiple voices and experiences to be heard. Such practices could in turn foster a sense of collective hope-characterised by the values of connectedness, caring, and collective agency-thereby equipping student teachers with the tools to build communities of hope in their classrooms and schools. The article concludes with implications of mobilising such a practice of hope through an engaged pedagogy in student teacher education in the South African context. <![CDATA[<b>East and South African-German Centre of Excellence for Educational Research Methodologies and Management (CERM-ESA). A case for internationalisation and higher education engagement</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2221-40702017000100009&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Schools are described as ideal settings for nurturing and fostering children's hopes, and the teaching profession as rooted in hopefulness. However, there is a paucity of research linking hope theory and teacher education in the South African context. Using evidence from my own transformative, visual participatory research with rural South African children on hope and well-being, I argue in this position paper that hope theory, in particular an African perspective of hope, should be positioned alongside discussions on practising an engaged pedagogy to enable teaching practices that are more congruent with an Afrocentric worldview. This article argues a need to infuse relational hope in teacher education practices by encouraging collaborative, participatory learning engagements that create safe and creative spaces for critical dialogue, allowing for multiple voices and experiences to be heard. Such practices could in turn foster a sense of collective hope-characterised by the values of connectedness, caring, and collective agency-thereby equipping student teachers with the tools to build communities of hope in their classrooms and schools. The article concludes with implications of mobilising such a practice of hope through an engaged pedagogy in student teacher education in the South African context.