Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Literator (Potchefstroom. Online)]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2219-823720180001&lang=pt vol. 39 num. 1 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Green postcolonialism in <i>Etosha</i> (Piet van Rooyen)</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2219-82372018000100001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt In Etosha (2010) the impact and aftereffect of the colonial system on the Etosha Nasional Park in Namibia, and on the people who lived there, is portrayed. This study explores the situations of various characters and groups who formerly resided there, focusing on aspects of their relationship with one another, as well as on the realities of colonial exploitation and the use or destruction of the natural environment. The question raised is how green postcolonialism takes form in this novel as a result of the convergence of conservation oriented and postcolonial perspectives. The study focuses on the ways Etosha challenges the reader to realise the full complexity of the question, 'Who is actually right, what is justifiable in the battle for survival?', specifically in our local context; and on how the reader is confronted with the task to find place-specific answers for questions aimed at our situation in Africa. It is found that the situations of various role players and their different viewpoints are depicted in a nuanced and convincing manner, contributing to the realistic portrayal of the complex issue of conservation versus exploitation in the postcolonial context. Etosha is a meaningful novel when evaluated within the context of the development of ecocriticism in South Africa. <![CDATA[<b>Characterisation and social impact of urban youth languages on urban toponymy: S'ncamtho toponomastics in Bulawayo</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2219-82372018000100002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article focuses on the characterisation of S'ncamtho toponyms in Bulawayo and it goes on to measure the impact of these toponyms on the population of Bulawayo dwellers. S'ncamtho is an urban youth variety that is built on urbanity and streetwise style. The study assumes that, as S'ncamtho is the language of the youth in Bulawayo, people are exposed to S'ncamtho toponyms as the youth are found in all spheres of urban life in Bulawayo, especially the taxi industry which is used by the majority of people in the city. The research collected S'ncamtho verbal toponyms from Godini taxi rank in Bulawayo through undisclosed nonparticipant observations and some from the intuition of the researcher. Intuition and interviews were used to get the etymology of the toponyms and questionnaire tests of familiarity and usage were used to measure the impact of these toponyms on the population. Content analysis is used to characterise and classify S'ncamtho toponyms in Bulawayo and the metaphor comprehension test is used to measure their impact on the population. This article assumes that S'ncamtho has its own toponyms for locations in the city and that these are popular, especially with the youth, but people across age groups now use them. <![CDATA[<b>Bridge builder between generations: Koos Roets's cooperation network in the Afrikaans film industry</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2219-82372018000100003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Koos Roets's contribution to the Afrikaans film industry is widely recognised. Nevertheless, very little has been published specifically about his role in the Afrikaans film industry, although many studies exist about his collaborators such as Jans Rautenbach and Katinka Heyns. This article investigates Roets's collaboration network by means of a network analysis, and identifies the persons with whom he collaborated the most, indicating his varied roles on different films. It is also indicated that he not only is and was an important role-player in his own right in this industry, but has also collaborated with many other important role-players in the Afrikaans film industry. He has contributed to Afrikaans films in collaboration with more than a 1000 persons throughout his career of nearly six decades. The directors, producers, sound operators, actors and crew with whom he has collaborated the most are highlighted, and the films on which they worked together are mentioned. <![CDATA[<b>'Who let out the secret?' - Sexual identity in Johann Nell's farm novel <i>Sondag op 'n voëlplaas</i> [<i>Sunday on a bird farm</i>] (2013)</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2219-82372018000100004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The statement of the narrator in Johann Nell's farm novel Sondag op 'n voëlplaas (2013) about his self-quest amongst 'wild, fierce and erect ostrich necks' (pp. 244-245), alludes to his doubts about his sexual identity. The apparent latent homosexual is strengthened by the epigraph, a direct translation of an excerpt from Calaf's aria 'Nessun Dorma' from Puccini's opera Turandot. In the traditional Afrikaans farm novel, the narrator is usually a third-person (auctorial) narrator. The use of a first-person narrator in Nell's novel emphasises his deviation from the (stereo)typical traits and attributes of the traditional farm novel. The subjectivity inherent to the first-person narration (the I-as-protagonist) implies that what is represented in this novel is the main character's version of reality and his response to, especially, the farm as bastion of masculinity and traditional socio-political beliefs. Based on the above, this article takes as its point of departure the hypothetical assumption that the epigraph has an important part to play in the interpretation of the secret in that the implied or abstract author, by means of a parodying perspective, highlights a specific vision regarding the thematic significance. The epigraph not only reinforces the idea of a lack of identity and the idea that the 'true' identity could perhaps be a homosexual disposition, but also that it is simultaneously an etiological journey to the original opera libretto. In its turn, the libretto can be traced back to the Greek myth of Oedipus and the sphinx. By both discussing the intertexts and analysing the narrator's language usage, his disposition and his tale of the (traumatised) self, his sexual identity is scrutinised. <![CDATA[<b>The indigenous Afrikaans film: Representation as a nationalistic endeavour</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2219-82372018000100005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Within the South African context, Afrikaans films unabashedly and predominantly served Afrikaner nationalism. Given the South African historical and political background, it is evident that Afrikaner nationalism has almost become an obscene term because of its association with the National(ist) Party and its apartheid policy: emblematic of an ideology and policy that has been rejected worldwide and has even been compared - albeit a skewed comparison - to National Socialism. In this article, the different stages that emancipation of a formerly colonised literature goes through, according to Amuta (1989), Ashcroft (1989) and Brink, will be discussed in detail with reference to the Afrikaans films, Geboortegrond (1946) and Hans die skipper (1952). In this process of representation, the historical past is re-assessed and laid to rest with far-reaching philosophical, ideological and poetical implications. In order to discuss the representation of this contextually bound discourse, mention will be made regarding important relevant theoretical concepts such as semiotics, discursive formations, literary reception and processing, reportorium, horizon of expectation and habitus. <![CDATA[<b>Something of a song for Stephen Gray</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2219-82372018000100006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Within the South African context, Afrikaans films unabashedly and predominantly served Afrikaner nationalism. Given the South African historical and political background, it is evident that Afrikaner nationalism has almost become an obscene term because of its association with the National(ist) Party and its apartheid policy: emblematic of an ideology and policy that has been rejected worldwide and has even been compared - albeit a skewed comparison - to National Socialism. In this article, the different stages that emancipation of a formerly colonised literature goes through, according to Amuta (1989), Ashcroft (1989) and Brink, will be discussed in detail with reference to the Afrikaans films, Geboortegrond (1946) and Hans die skipper (1952). In this process of representation, the historical past is re-assessed and laid to rest with far-reaching philosophical, ideological and poetical implications. In order to discuss the representation of this contextually bound discourse, mention will be made regarding important relevant theoretical concepts such as semiotics, discursive formations, literary reception and processing, reportorium, horizon of expectation and habitus.