Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Health SA Gesondheid (Online)]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2071-973620190001&lang=pt vol. 24 num. lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Perceptions of patients regarding diabetes-related health communication strategies in the Free State, South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-97362019000100001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt BACKGROUND: This study researched the perceptions of patients diagnosed with diabetes concerning diabetes-related health communication strategies in the Free State province in South Africa. The prolongation and quality of life of patients diagnosed with diabetes are affected by lifestyle choices. An enabler of risk reduction is health communication which informs, influences and motivates individuals to adopted health-focused lifestyles. AIM: This study sought to describe the perceptions of patients regarding diabetes-related health communication strategies in the Free State, South Africa. SETTING: This study was carried out in primary health care centres and community health care centres within the Free State province in South Africa. METHODS: A qualitative, descriptive and exploratory research design was used in this study. Thirty-four patients diagnosed with type two diabetes for at least a year were purposively included in this study. Semi-structured interviews in Afrikaans, English, Sotho and Xhosa were conducted. Data analysis was through inductive reasoning and thematic analysis. RESULTS: The majority of the respondents were older women having been diagnosed with diabetes for more than 5 years, with at least primary school education and of diverse South African ethnicities. The main prompting questions operationalised the term 'perception', probing their feelings, experiences and knowledge of health-related communication strategies as presented by a variety of information sources. After recording interviews, data were analysed according to themes, categories and sub-categories. CONCLUSIONS: The study highlights factors that encourage patients to seek help and foster attitudes of compliance. Practical problems regarding the management of diabetes are underlined. The role of family, as well as the patient-caregiver relationship, in the acceptance and management of the disease is revealed. Societal perception of male symptomology is shown. The study offers information to stakeholders and health care workers for continued successful management of diabetes in communities. <![CDATA[<b>A model to promote the uptake of male circumcision as an HIV-preventive measure in high HIV and low male circumcision prevalence settings</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-97362019000100002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) remain the leading global burden of disease, especially in Southern Africa. As such, efforts to develop innovative preventive and curative measures continue to be a global priority. Of late, the World Health Organization recognised and recommended mass male circumcision (MC) as an adjunct HIV-preventive measure in 14 selected sub-Sahara African countries. However, despite efforts to promote the uptake of MC in these countries, the uptake remains significantly below set targets. AIM: The purpose of this article is to describe the process that was followed in developing, describing and evaluating a model to promote the uptake of MC as an HIV-preventive measure in high HIV and low MC settings. SETTING: The model is designed for all settings of high HIV and low MC prevalence. METHOD: A theory-generative, qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was used. The process involved four distinct steps, namely concept analysis, description of relationship statements, and description and evaluation of the model using the criteria of clarity, simplicity, generality, accessibility and importance. RESULTS: The central concept was identified as 'promote the uptake of MC', and three integral constituents were identified for the process, such as transforming men's mindsets about MC, facilitating accessibility and utilisation of MC services, and maintaining a supportive social system. These formed the basis for the model. CONCLUSION: The model provides a framework of reference for healthcare providers in promoting the uptake of MC as an HIV-preventive measure in high HIV and low MC settings. <![CDATA[<b>Rooibos herbal tea: An optimal cup and its consumers</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-97362019000100003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt BACKGROUND: Rooibos types and forms and how prepared and flavoured influence the total polyphenol content and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). AIM: To denote an optimal rooibos cup as having the highest total polyphenol content and TAC, considering the different types, forms, preparation methods and flavourings and amounts (Phase 1), and determine the demographic, lifestyle and rooibos consumption characteristics of adult rooibos consumers, and the association of these characteristics with drinking the optimal cup (Phase 2). SETTING: Assays: Oxidative Stress Research Centre, Cape Peninsula University of Technology; Consumer survey: George area, South Africa METHOD: Phase 1 entailed determining the total polyphenol content (Folin-Ciocalteau method) and TAC (Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity and ferric-reducing antioxidant power assay) of the prepared rooibos samples. For Phase 2, a developed, pilot tested questionnaire was used to profile adult rooibos consumers. RESULTS: Phase 1: the following samples delivered higher total polyphenol content and TAC: green (type), green leaves and powdered extract (forms), and sample steeped for 10 min or longer (preparation method). The identified optimal cup was sample steeped for 10 min or longer. Phase 2: a total of 308 respondents completed the questionnaire. Few consumed more than one rooibos cup per day (25.3%; n = 78) and the optimal cup (15.9%; n = 49). These latter respondents comprised those who steeped rooibos in a teapot (not a cup or mug) (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The optimal cup was identified as sample steeped for 10 min or longer. The rooibos consumers did not consume it sufficiently, nor steeped it long enough. <![CDATA[<b>Secondary school teachers' experiences related to learner teenage pregnancies and unexpected deliveries at school</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-97362019000100004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt BACKGROUND: The incidence of learner teenage pregnancies can be reduced, provided that the major stakeholders, which include the Department of Education and the Department of Health, combine to address this issue. Despite the implementation of Life Orientation as a school subject, which focuses on sexual behaviour, health, decision-making, pregnancy risk, sexually transmitted infections and HIV and AIDS, the prevalence of learner teenage pregnancies at secondary schools remains alarmingly high. AIM: The purpose of this study was to explore and describe teachers' experiences of learner teenage pregnancies in secondary schools in a province in South Africa. SETTING: Secondary schools in KwaZulu-Natal. METHOD: A qualitative approach with exploratory, descriptive and contextual strategies was used in this research. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with teachers who had been selected through purposive sampling. Tesch's steps of systematic open coding were used to analyse all of the interviews. RESULTS: The results that emerged during the data analysis indicate that firstly, teachers' experiences of having pregnant learners in their classrooms are negative as these learners are frequently absent from school, perform badly and drop out of school. Secondly, teachers' experiences related to unexpected deliveries are coloured by their lack of the necessary skills and competencies to deal and their resultant insecurity. Thirdly, the teachers feel that they do not receive the assistance they need to deal with teenage pregnancies as well as unexpected deliveries. CONCLUSIONS: Collaboration between and continuous support from the Department of Health and the Department of Education are crucial if teenage pregnancies at secondary schools are to be handled with greater success. Support from health care personnel should include guidance on contraception and health campaigns should target both the teachers and secondary school learners. Furthermore, coping strategies for the teachers should form part of the preservice curriculum of teachers. <![CDATA[<b>The clinical environment</b><b>: </b><b>A facilitator of professional socialisation</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-97362019000100005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt BACKGROUND: Competencies of health care workers, including nurses, often do not meet the health needs of populations. The clinical learning environment (CLE) is vital in socialising neophyte student nurses to display the desired competencies. Student nurses are however confronted with challenges, especially in the CLE, during this process. AIM: This article shares three validated guidelines to support professional nurses and nurse educators in facilitating appropriate professional socialisation of student nurses in the CLE. SETTING: The study was conducted in an 832-bed academic hospital and nine nursing education institutions (NEIs) that offered the nursing programme concerned in a province in South Africa. METHOD: A sequential, exploratory, mixed-methods study was conducted and qualitative data were collected from two purposive samples, consisting of seven focus group interviews and field notes. Five themes that emerged from the integrated data guided the instrument design to collect data quantitatively from 277 educators. Experts validated 10 guidelines to a set of criteria, which was developed combining all data. RESULTS: Qualitative and quantitative research evidenced that the CLE mostly did not support student nurses during professional socialisation. A few role models' behaviour was noteworthy, while student supervision was inadequate. The CLE was stressful, lacked in resources, marked by uncoordinated student placement, insufficient communication and inadequate preparation of student nurses. This evidence informed the development of the guidelines. CONCLUSIONS: The guidelines were (1) the empowerment of role models through reflective practice, (2) capacity building of professional nurses and nurse educators as clinical supervisors by means of intervention strategies and (3) adopting a multifaceted approach in the creation of a positive CLE. These guidelines could facilitate appropriate professional socialisation of student nurses. <![CDATA[<b>Perceived effectiveness of complementary medicine by mothers of infants with colic in Gauteng</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-97362019000100006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt BACKGROUND: Infantile colic is a self-limiting condition, characterised by spasmodic, excessive and inconsolable crying without apparent cause. Although common, there is no widely accepted conventional treatment approach for colic. Complementary medicine is often promoted as an alternative therapeutic option for infantile colic; however, there is limited research available on its use, safety and effectiveness. AIM: The aim of this study was to determine the perceived effectiveness of complementary medicine by mothers of infants with colic by means of the Infantile Colic Questionnaire. SETTING: Mothers of infants who had colic were recruited from complementary medicine pharmacies, schools, baby clinics and various businesses in Gauteng, South Africa. METHODS: A quantitative-descriptive design was used whereby data was collected through a randomised, cross-sectional questionnaire. The research sample consisted of 152 participants (mothers), aged between 18 and 45 years, with one or more children who suffered from symptoms of infantile colic, who had used complementary medicine as a form of treatment. RESULTS: Results indicated that most participants made use of both complementary and conventional medicines for their infant's colic; the most commonly used complementary medicine products were homeopathic remedies, probiotics and herbal medicines. Some participants were, however, unfamiliar with the term 'complementary medicine', indicating a need for further patient education. CONCLUSIONS: The participants perceived complementary medicines as safe and effective forms of treatment for infantile colic. However, further, larger scale studies should be conducted to validate this finding. <![CDATA[<b>Experiences of women enrolled in a prevention of mother to child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus infection programme in Zimbabwe</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-97362019000100007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt BACKGROUND: Prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) programmes have been reported to reduce the rate of transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by 30% - 40% during pregnancy and childbirth. The PMTCT transmission is achieved by offering HIV prophylaxis or initiating antiretrovirals to pregnant women who test HIV positive. Being aware of the experiences of these women will assist in planning and implementing the relevant care and support. The study was conducted in three phases. AIM: This article will address phase 1 which is to explore and describe the experiences of pregnant women living with HIV. SETTING: The study setting was a PMTCT site in a Provincial Hospital, in Zimbabwe. METHODS: The study design was qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual. In-depth face-to-face interviews were conducted from a purposive sample of 20 pregnant women. Thematic data analysis was performed. RESULTS: Six themes emerged: realities of disclosure, a need for quality of life, perceived stigmatisation, inadequate knowledge on infant feeding, continuity of care, empowerment and support CONCLUSIONS: The study concluded that pregnant women living with HIV require empowerment and support to live positively with HIV. <![CDATA[<b>Experiences of student nurses regarding the bursary system in KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-97362019000100008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt BACKGROUND: During 2010, the South African nursing education system was restructured, changing student nurses from having supernumerary status to being bursary holders. Changes with the introduction of this new bursary system included institutional factors and benefits that could be removed from the students, potentially hampering students' sense of belonging. AIM: This study aimed to describe the experiences of students receiving bursaries in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) province and to make recommendations for improving the system to bursary providers, educational institutions and practical settings based on these students' experiences of the bursary system. SETTING: The experiences of student nurses regarding the bursary system are described within a specified setting comprising two nursing campuses in KZN. METHOD: A qualitative study design was used and seven focus group interviews were conducted with purposively selected participants, representing the target population of first-, second- and third-year male and female nursing students registered for the Diploma in Nursing (General, Psychiatric, Community) and Midwifery. RESULTS: Two main themes and eight subthemes were identified. The findings indicated that some of the bursary system's experiences were negative as opposed to students having supernumerary status. These experiences had negative socio-economic, psychological, clinical, academic and family impacts. Many concerns related to staff members' attitudes, shortages of nurses and service demands during students' clinical practice assignments. CONCLUSIONS: The bursary system was not viewed as being beneficial to students as they did not receive all the benefits from being bursary holders. Support in clinical and academic areas was lacking as they were considered to be employees during their clinical assignments. There is an urgent need to review the bursary system.