Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Health SA Gesondheid (Online)]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2071-973620170001&lang=pt vol. 22 num. lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Young families become mindful of their possibilities through the appreciation of their family life</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-97362017000100001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Young families, as viewed through a multi-generational lens, provide the environment in which children can be nurtured and socialised. The purpose of the research is to explore and describe how the parents and grandparents of young families appreciate their family life. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual multiple case study design was used to conduct the study. Purposive sampling methods were applied to select families according to the sampling criteria, each family representing an individual case study. Appreciative inquiry interviews were conducted with the young parents and available grandparents, during which the participants were asked four open-ended questions. Data collection was enriched by means of reflective letters to participants, collages created by the young parents, and the researcher's field notes and journal inscriptions. The data collected from each individual case study was analysed and then synthesised by means of a cross-case analysis. A cross-case validation report was compiled. The themes and categories that emerged from the data were discussed. The research study concluded that when young families embarked on a journey of discovering their strengths and potential in the larger family system, they creatively envision and discovered the possibilities to transform their destiny in a purposeful and constructive way. <![CDATA[<b>Best practice during intrapartum care: A concept analysis</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-97362017000100002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt RATIONALE: Best practice is an abstract word open to different interpretations. The definition of best practice depends on the context. PURPOSE: The purpose is to explore the meaning of the concept of best practice within the context of intrapartum care. METHOD: The concept of best practice was analysed using Wilson's method of concept analysis. Dictionaries, a thesaurus, and an internet search were employed. References of journals were used to identify extra sources. Data saturation was reached at 117 definitions and uses of the concept of best practice. The definitions and uses of the concept of best practice listed in column one were read repeatedly. Common and similar patterns of words were highlighted. Grouping of common attributes and connotations occurred in column two and further deductive analysis and synthesis occurred in column three where derived essential attributes of the concept of best practice were categorised. RESULTS: Three broad categories emerged, namely (1) Values as antecedents of best practice; (2) A three-phased interactive integrative cyclic process of best practice; (phase one: awareness; phase two: need analysis and interactive process; phase three: consolidation); and (3) Desired outcomes of best practice, with resultant theoretical definition of the concept best practice during intra-partum care. Theoretical validity was attained through 117 sources used. RECOMMENDATION: The results of the concept analysis of best practice should be used to develop a model to facilitate best practice during intra-partum care <![CDATA[<b>The conceptualization of family care during critical illness in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-97362017000100003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: In recent years there has been a movement to promote patients as partners in their care; however this may not always be possible as in the case of critically ill patients, who are often sedated and mechanically ventilated. This results in family members being involved in the care of the patient. To date, this type of care has been represented by three dominant theoretical conceptualizations and frameworks one of which is family centered care; however there is a lack of consensus on the definition of family centered care. Hence the objective of this study was to explore the meaning of family care within a South African context. METHODOLOGY: This study adopted a qualitative approach and a grounded theory research design by Strauss and Corbin (1990). Participants from two hospitals: one private and one public were selected to participate in the study. There was a total of 31 participants (family members, intensive care nurses and doctors) who volunteered to participate in the study. Data collection included in-depth individual interviews. Open, axial and selective coding was conducted to analyse data. Nvivo data analysis software was used to assist with the data analysis. FINDINGS: The findings of this study revealed that family care is conceptualized as togetherness, partnership, respect and dignity. CONCLUSION: During a critical illness, patients' families fulfil an additional essential role for patients who may be unconscious or unable to communicate or make decisions. FMs not only provide vital support to their loved one, but also become the "voice" of the patient. <![CDATA[<b>Strengths of families to limit relapse in mentally ill family members</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-97362017000100004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt BACKGROUND: Relapse prevention in mental health care is important. Utilising the strengths of families can be a valuable approach in relapse prevention. Studies on family strengths have been conducted but little has been done on the strengths of family members to help limit relapse in mental health care users. The purpose of this research was to explore and describe the strengths of family members in assisting mental health care users to limit relapses. METHODS: A phenomenological design was followed. Purposive sampling was used and 15 family members of mental health care users who have not relapsed in the previous two years participated. Individual unstructured interviews were conducted. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Four main themes were identified, namely accepting the condition of the mental health care users, having faith, involving the mentally ill family members in daily activities and being aware of what aggravates the mentally ill family members. CONCLUSIONS: Family members go through a process of acceptance and receive educational information and assistance from health professionals. In this process families discover and apply their strengths to limit relapses of mentally ill family members. It is important that family members caring for mentally ill family members are involved in their treatment from the onset, and that they are guided through a process of acceptance.