Scielo RSS <![CDATA[SA Journal of Industrial Psychology]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2071-076320210001&lang=en vol. 47 num. 1 lang. en <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Exploring the consequences of person-environment misfit in the workplace: A qualitative study</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100001&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: Although the literature on person-environment fit has burgeoned, misfit has been relatively overlooked. The 21st-century business environment has seen an increase in the number of employee misfits in the workplace, and this has proved a challenge to many organisations. It is uncertain how misfit impacts on employees and organisations experiencing this phenomenon. RESEARCH PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to broaden the current misfit research boundaries by exploring the consequences of misfit as experienced by individuals at work. MOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: There exist several under-researched areas in the misfit terrain. One such is the effect of misfit in the workplace. This study aimed to fill this void. RESEARCH APPROACH, DESIGN AND METHOD: A qualitative constructivist grounded theory approach was adopted. Using purposive and snowball sampling, 40 employee misfits participated in face-to-face, semi-structured, in-depth interviews. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and data analysed by using four steps prescribed by grounded theory researchers. MAIN FINDINGS: Results highlight two themes that epitomise the consequences of misfit: (1) causing negative reactions in individual employees and (2) producing organisationally directed detrimental outcomes PRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: The study provides managers with a more profound understanding of the adverse consequences of misfit in the workplace and this will assist them in dealing more effectively with misfits. CONTRIBUTIONS/VALUE ADDED: This research contributes to the literature in two ways: (1) it contributes to the theory of misfit by adding to the conception that misfit is a qualitatively different construct to that of low fit or the absence of fit, and (2) our approach sheds light on the multifaceted and intricate construct of misfit and its consequences. <![CDATA[<b>Flourishing in trying circumstances: A hermeneutic phenomenological exploration of volunteer well-being</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100002&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: Owing to the reliance on volunteer labour for their success, the behaviour and attitudes of volunteers is of central concern to non-profit organisations (NPOs). To optimise volunteer functioning and retention in a unique and challenging work context, it is necessary to understand their well-being. RESEARCH PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to explore the work-life experiences of volunteers to better understand the manifestations of well-being in the volunteering work context. MOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Because of the unique and challenging work setting that constitutes volunteering, and the important contribution volunteers make to society and the economy, research is needed from an industrial and organisational psychology (IOP) perspective on the well-being of volunteers. RESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: This study was directed by a hermeneutic phenomenological methodology. Eight volunteers from an NPO operating in the South African provincial health sector participated in in-depth interviews. The data obtained were analysed using a six-stage theoretical thematic analytical process. MAIN FINDINGS: Guided by 'flourishing at work' as the theoretical framework, four themes were co-constructed from the data: learning and growing in competence, demonstrating an engaged state of mind, exhibiting emotional well-being and feeling socially integrated and connected. PRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: The results of this study may assist NPOs in developing context-specific interventions aimed at managing and enhancing well-being in volunteers. CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: This study contributes to the body of knowledge on the well-being of volunteers, who are considered a distinct workforce in the field of IOP. <![CDATA[<b>Anxiety and excitement in the fourth industrial revolution: A systems- psychodynamic perspective</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100003&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: The fourth industrial revolution (4IR) creates numerous organisational changes. New technologies and their influences are studied; however, hardly any research focuses on studying the unconscious systems psychodynamics (SPs RESEARCH PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to explore and understand feelings in an organisational 4IR context from a SP perspective Motivation for the study: Scholars have recently issued calls to shift attention from describing the 4IR processes in terms of rapid structural, technological and disruptive changes towards the understanding of subjective 'lived-through' feelings and experiences and in situ responses to 4IR events. Based on this shift, the authors aim at exploring the 'lived-through' experiences in this study from a SP viewpoint. Research approach/design and method: This article presents findings from a qualitative study conducted in a technology organisation, analysing 16 interviews with managers in middle and top management positions. MAIN FINDINGS: The findings show SP playing out in terms of splitting, projection, projective identification and idealisation. Findings with regard to the five fundamental systemic behavioural conventions (dependency, flight/fight, pairing, me-ness, one-ness or we-ness) are also presented Practical/managerial implications: Managers experience anxiety and excitement as strongly influential in the 4IR transformational processes and as playing an important role in SP processes. Contributions/value-add: Organisations and employees need to be made aware of the new trends in the 4IR and the underlying unconscious processes within the organisation. Employees could undergo training to improve their understanding of intra- and inter-psychological and organisational processes and the impact on organisational change and transformation within the 4IR contexts. <![CDATA[<b>Determining the dimensionality and gender invariance of the MACE work-to-family enrichment scale using bifactor and approximate invariance tests</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100004&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: Uncertainty about which measurement model of the MACE work-to-family enrichment scale (MACE-W2FE) is best supported by the data called for clarification´. RESEARCH PURPOSE: The main aim of our study was to get clarity on the dimensionality of the MACE-W2FE. The secondary aim was to test for approximate invariance of the measure for gender groups. MOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Variations in the reported measurement models for the MACE-W2FE between studies are not conducive for theory development and called for clarification. Previous models reported were a multidimensional model and a second-order model. Approximate measurement invariance is a prerequisite for study differences between gender groups. RESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: We did seek to resolve the problem by using bifactor model analysis, factor strength indices and local indicator misspecification analyses using a sample of 786 South African employees. Invariance was tested using the alignment optimisation method. MAIN FINDINGS: In this study, we solved a substantive research problem by determining that the data from the study best supported a single breadth factor or first-order factor model that was essentially unidimensional. The invariance tests across gender groups confirmed approximate configural, measurement and scalar invariances for the unidimensional model. PRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: Researchers and practitioners may include the MACE-W2FE in studies as a single-aggregated score without negligible loss in measurement precision. CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: The extended confirmatory factor analyses we conducted proved valuable in resolving the MACE-W2FE's dimensionality vacillations, thereby enhancing the validity of inferences made from scale scores. <![CDATA[<b>Called to the ministry: Narratives of career choice amongst female pastors in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100005&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: There is a noted entrance of females into careers that have been a preserve traditionally of males. One such cohort needing understanding concerns females entering the pastoral ministry. RESEARCH PURPOSE: The study explores the career choice issues of female pastors into the pastoral ministry. MOTIVATION OF THE STUDY: Calls have been made within the local and international literature for studies that give attention to understanding issues related to career development through the prism of calling, faith and religiosity. RESEARCH APPROACH, DESIGN AND METHOD: A narrative inquiry using a sample of 15 females who have studied for the pastoral ministry within a leading Christian protestant denomination was utilised. MAIN FINDINGS: Three main narratives emerged. First, the entrance to the pastoral ministry as an answer to the voice of God and also made clear through signs from God. Second, an entrance to the pastoral ministry is a result of support from significant others. Finally, an entrance to the pastoral ministry is due to the need to challenge the status quo and give more female representation to a perceived gendered space, the church. PRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: Career counsellors may need to be aware of the issues that surround females entering careers often classified not their own. Strategies can be proposed based on such an understanding within contemporary career counselling practice. CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: This study contributes to the growing body of knowledge, focusing on the need to understand how issues of calling, faith and religiosity affect individual career choice and, subsequently, career development. <![CDATA[<b>The effects of work resources and career adaptability on employee health: A case of sample of teachers in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100006&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: There is a rise in health-related challenges within the confines of the organisation. Strategies are needed not just from a human resources practitioner but also a theoretical basis in finding solutions to such challengesRESEARCH PURPOSE: Firstly, to determine the effects that work resources have on employee health and its two facets of physical and mental health. Secondly, to determine if career adaptability moderates the relationship between work resources and employee healthMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Studies exist in the literature that focus on the intersection of individual and organisational factors on health constructs such as mental health. Further, such studies continue to be an issue of inquiry especially within the public service professions such as teaching.RESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: A quantitative research approach utilising a survey data collection technique was utilised. Simple linear regression and a hierarchical regression were performed to analyse the data.MAIN FINDINGS: Work resources do predict employee mental and physical health. Further, career adaptability does not moderate the relationship between work resources and employee health among teachersPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: Based on the findings, recommendations are made that assist not just teachers but also those engaged in creating a context in which teachers can thrive from a management perspective.CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: The findings help us focus on the notion that in rural high schools of South Africa, a supportive work environment for assisting teachers to utilise work resources for organisational functioning, in a manner that is friendly to their mental and physical health is needed. <![CDATA[<b>Addressing gender discrimination in cognitive assessment using the English Comprehension Test</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100007&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: The empirically designed English Comprehension Test (ECT) is theorised to measure verbal reasoning and is currently undergoing validation. The test development produced two versions of the ECT, namely, ECT version 1.2 and ECT version 1.3. This study focuses on the latest test version, ECT version 1.3RESEARCH PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to statistically explore the performance of men and women who were assessed by the empirically designed ECTMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Cognitive assessment has often been used as a discriminatory tool against gender, race and/or languages. The discrimination against race and gender were the consequences of a patriarchal system and Apartheid in South Africa, as black men and women were deemed to be subordinate to white men. With the demise of Apartheid, measures have been put in place to guard against unfair assessment practices. In addition, legislation was developed to ensure that test developers and test users employed assessments that did not unfairly prejudice individuals based on their race, gender and language. These measures are imperative to ensure fairness and equal opportunities for men and women across race and language groups.RESEARCH DESIGN, APPROACH AND METHOD: This study used a quantitative cross-sectional design. The ECT was administered to a non-probability convenience sample of 881 individuals. The data were analysed by differential test functioning (DTF) in Winsteps and analysis of variance (ANOVA) in the Statistical Product and Service Solutions (SPSS) package.MAIN FINDINGS: The results indicated that the majority of the test items did not present any bias, but five possibly biased items were identified across gender groups in the test. These five items that were possibly biased appear to be affected by language and not gendered knowledge, and this, however, necessitates further investigation. The ANOVA results only indicated statistically significant differences across the different language groups, thereby confirming the DTF resultsPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: A major limitation of this study is the restriction of range and lack of generalisability.CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: This study promotes the use of DTF and ANOVA as a means of ensuring fairness in assessment practices across gender groups. Moreover, it contributes to cross-cultural test development and validation research in South Africa. <![CDATA[<b>Call centre agents' emotional intelligence as predicators of their exhaustion and professional efficacy: The moderating effect of meaningfulness</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: Call centres in a digital work environment in Africa typically require high levels of sustained interpersonal contact with customers, which lead to exhaustion and call centre agent withdrawalRESEARCH PURPOSE: This study investigates the interaction effects between call centre agents' emotional intelligence and their sense of meaningfulness (as moderating mechanism) in predicting their exhaustion and professional efficacyMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Human resource practitioners need deeper understanding/insight of meaningfulness as a moderating mechanism in the link between call centre agents' emotional intelligence, levels of exhaustion and sense of professional efficacy. Such knowledge is important for informing wellness programmes for call centre agents.RESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: A quantitative cross-sectional survey approach was followed. A non-probability sample of (N = 409) of permanently employed call centre employees in Lagos, Nigeria, and Johannesburg and Durban, South Africa participated in this study.MAIN FINDINGS: Moderated regression analysis showed that call centre agents' sense of meaningfulness and the ability to perceive and manage others' emotions significantly moderates exhaustion and professional efficacyPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: Overall the results provide evidence of the importance of considering call centre agents' sense of meaningfulness, perceptions of emotions and managing others' emotions as a resource for supporting their exhaustion levels as well as professional efficacy in dealing with stress.CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: The research will add to the interventions needed to be developed to strengthen the relationship between sense of meaningfulness, perceptions of emotions and managing others' emotions and exhaustion and professional efficacy in the call centre industry within Lagos, Nigeria, and Johannesburg and Durban, South Africa. <![CDATA[<b>Personality and psychological conditions in relation to job engagement amongst municipal workers in the Eastern Cape province, South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100009&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: Increasing job engagement in a sustainable way remains a challenge and the question remains as to why employees, when working under comparable conditions display signs of job engagement whereas others display a few or no signs of job engagementRESEARCH PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to investigate the linear relationships and establish usable models for the big five personality traits and psychological conditions on job engagement amongst municipal workersMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: The motivation of this study is to examine the relationship between personality and psychological conditions on job engagement.RESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: The study employed a quantitative, cross- sectional research design using a questionnaire on a sample of 403 district municipal workers in the Eastern Cape province, South Africa.MAIN FINDINGS: Findings show that conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, intellect and all psychological conditions had a positive relationship with job engagement while neuroticism has a negative relationship with job engagement. Hierarchical regression models revealed that psychological conditions add unique variance in predicting job engagement above and beyond that which is predicted by the personality traitsPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: Job engagement can be enhanced through the hiring employees with certain personality traits and enhancing meaningfulness, safety and availability of psychological resources in the workplace.CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: The study findings support a relatively rich literature which suggests that employees with certain personality traits such as conscientiousness, agreeableness, intellect and perceives that all psychological conditions are being met tend to be more engaged in their job. <![CDATA[<b>Illegitimate tasks of primary school teachers at selected schools in the Western Cape: A reality for a developing country?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100010&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: The quality of basic education in South Africa is in need of interventions to improve the general standard of education offered in many public schools. Teachers and their work experiences are important factors that impact this standardRESEARCH PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to shed light on the factors that contribute to the experiences and outcomes of illegitimate tasks, as experienced by teachers, and the potential buffers to the negative effects of these tasksMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: The motivation for this study was to inform human resource practices and interventions to enhance the work experiences of teachers.RESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: Exploratory qualitative research was conducted with 10 primary school teachers (n = 10) from a selected Western Cape education district. Responses to semi-structured individual interviews were transcribed verbatim, unedited and categorised into main themes through directed content analysis.MAIN FINDINGS: Environmental and psychological factors that lead to the experience of unnecessary and unreasonable illegitimate tasks, the time-consuming nature and outcomes of these tasks, as well as mechanisms that can buffer the harmful effects of illegitimate tasks, were identifiedPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: The identification of various contributing factors resulting in teachers' experience of different types of illegitimate tasks and associated outcomes. Potential interventions and recommendations for future research are made.CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADDITION: Qualitative studies regarding teachers' experience of illegitimate tasks in the South African context are lacking. This article sheds light on the contributing factors, unnecessary and unreasonable tasks experienced and outcomes, as well as mechanisms that buffer the effect of illegitimate tasks amongst primary school teachers. <![CDATA[<b>Discrimination challenges and psychological well-being of black African queer employees</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100011&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: It is known that black queer employees are exposed to various forms of discrimination because of their sexual orientation being different from the norm. However, because of societal progression in terms of equality and inclusivity in Africa, it is hoped that the discriminatory challenge has lessened and that black queer employees are now in a position to experience well-being. When employees experience well-being, personal functioning and organisational performance are promotedRESEARCH PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to investigate black queer employees' experience of discrimination in the workplace, as well as their psychological well-beingMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Previous research studies investigating black queer individuals were mostly conducted in a developed world setting and approached from a pathological stance. As a result of progressive societal changes taking place in Africa, it seems necessary to also conduct research focussing on this minority social group from a positive psychological stance.RESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: The study was qualitative in nature, and data were collected from nine black queer employees. The research strategy of phenomenology was used, because it reveals the lived experiences of black queer individuals around a specific phenomenon; for example, sexual orientation.MAIN FINDINGS: The findings of the study show that although black queer employees did not report experiencing discrimination, there are still a number of discriminatory challenges to which they are exposed. The overall impression was that black queer employees are experiencing psychological well-being, despite the discriminatory challenges that they are exposed toPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: Although much progress has been made in Africa to promote equality and inclusivity, more can be done to support black queer employees. Organisations should place more emphasis on wellness programmes, employee support programmes and health and safety initiatives, to promote a supportive working environment for black queer employees.CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: The study contributes to the literature on the work experience and well-being of black African queer employees. <![CDATA[<b>The validation of a diversity climate measurement instrument for the South African environment</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100012&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: South Africa had a distinctive diversity environment with unique diversity-related challenges. Researchers and practitioners required a validated diversity climate instrument that can be used to examine diversity management observations in a South African settingRESEARCH PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to address a research opportunity to source, test and validate a diversity climate instrument for the South African environmentMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Studies examining the conceptualisation, validation and measurement invariance of a diversity climate instrument for the South African environment do not yet exist.RESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: A quantitative approach with cross-sectional design was utilised. A total of 323 respondents from a convenience sample formed part of this study. Statistical analysis included reliability, validity and measurement invariance computations.MAIN FINDINGS: An applicable one-dimensional diversity climate assessment instrument was identified from literature. This study found evidence indicating that the instrument was reliable and valid across white and African population groupsPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: The assessment of diversity climate will be an accurate indication on how well an organisation is managing diversity. A validated measuring instrument will be a valuable managerial tool for any South African organisation, which can assist with future decision making.CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: This study was able to source and validate a diversity climate measuring instrument for a unique diversity setting, such as South Africa. <![CDATA[<b>Stress, flourishing and intention to leave of teachers: Does coping type matter?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100013&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: Teachers face a demanding work environment which might cause stress. Depending on teachers' coping profile, distress might indirectly affect teachers' intentions to resign from their jobs via their flourishingRESEARCH PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate the associations between teachers' perceived stress, flourishing at work, intention to leave their jobs and coping typesMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: The effect of stress on flourishing at work has not been studied in relation to teachers' intentions to leave. Furthermore, no person-centred studies on coping of teachers in relation to their well-being and retention were found.RESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: A sample of teachers (n = 209) participated in a cross-sectional study. The Perceived Stress Scale, Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced (COPE) Inventory, Flourishing-at-Work Scale - Short Form and Intention to Leave Scale were administered. Latent variable modelling was used to analyse the data.MAIN FINDINGS: Flourishing at work was positively associated with perceived positive stress and low perceived distress. Perceived distress impacted teachers' intentions to leave directly and indirectly (via low flourishing). Perceived positive stress indirectly and negatively impacted teachers' intentions to leave via flourishing. Person-centred analyses identified three types of copers that were associated with perceived positive stress and distressPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: It is essential to focus on teachers' stress, coping type and flourishing to promote their retention.CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: This study provided insights regarding the associations between teachers' perceived stress, flourishing at work and intention to leave their jobs. Moreover, it showed that coping types are associated with the perceived stress of teachers. <![CDATA[<b>Self-management strategies of graduate employees to enhance work engagement</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100014&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: The hiring of graduates is valuable to organisations. It is necessary to understand the self-management behaviours they display and the behaviours required to keep them engagedRESEARCH PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to explore how self-management strategies enhance work engagement of recent graduates who find themselves in a new environment of the world of workMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Employee engagement is of both academic and practitioner interest. With organisations hiring graduates, it is valuable to understand the self-management behaviours needed to remain engaged.RESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: A qualitative research approach was employed through an interpretivist research paradigm. A purposive sample of 12 graduate employees (median age = 24) in various fields of work were interviewed (women = 11, men = 1; black = 11, coloured = 1). The graduates participated in semi-structured interviews. A thematic analysis was conducted and five themes emerged.MAIN FINDINGS: Through an inductive approach, the five themes that emerged concerning self-management strategies used by graduates to enhance their work engagement are goal setting, self-cueing, self-observation, self-reward and self-punishment and work engagement practicesPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: Self-management strategies help to sustain an engaged workforce. Organisations that make use of graduate recruitment will largely benefit from the findings.CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: There is limited research on the topic pertaining to graduate employees. Graduates remain relevant in the organisation, and hence, the study makes a contribution to theory and practice. A model is presented with recommendations for graduates and the organisation, which, when implemented, have the potential to enhance work engagement. <![CDATA[<b>A competency framework for coaches working in coaching development centres</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100015&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: Globalisation and the new world of work has changed the labour market, resulting in highly complex, volatile and dynamic environments. Organisations are dependent on highly skilled human capital to not only survive but also thrive. Selecting and developing talent is thus becoming a business necessity. Assessment centres (ACs) and development assessment centres (DACs) have become popular tools to manage talent because of the successful outcomes it provides. In recent years, there has been a noticeable increase in the awareness of the benefits that coaching can offer in the AC environment as well as the development of coaching development centres (CDCs). However, research on CDCs is still limited. For CDCs to provide the same rigorous results as ACs and ADCs, a well-defined competency framework is needed for coaches working in a CDCRESEARCH PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to explore the required competencies and formulate a competency framework for coaches working in a CDCMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Coaching, which is at the heart of coaching practices such as executive coaching, one-on-one coaching, team coaching and CDCs, requires a clear set of coaching competencies to ensure that it deliver its mandate to its clients: individuals, organisations and the profession. Coaches in a CDC environment work in a different context and require different competencies. A competency framework for CDC specifically is therefore needed.RESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: Adopting a qualitative methodology, a self-completed questionnaire was administered to eight participants, followed by a semi-structured interview. Lastly, the competency framework was verified by an expert panel of five experts using the Delphi technique.MAIN FINDINGS: A final competency framework consisting of 25 competencies, of which 14 are considered as core competencies, was validatedPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: The study contributes to the understanding of the unique behavioural demands associated with coaches operating in the context of a CDC. It provides a conceptual and practical framework of what competencies are needed to work successfully and effectively as a coach in a CDC, and ultimately enhance the effectiveness of a CDC.CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: Utilising this framework in practice will enable us to use candidates best suited to the role of a coach at a CDC, and will enhance the overall success of such centres. <![CDATA[<b>Leadership behaviour, team effectiveness, technological flexibility, work engagement and performance during COVID-19 lockdown: An exploratory study</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100016&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has taken the world by storm. Little is known about leadership, motivation and employee performance during pandemics and associated lockdownsRESEARCH PURPOSE: The current study investigated a model of leadership behaviour, team effectiveness, technological flexibility, work engagement and performance in the context of a 'hard lockdown' in South AfricaMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting lockdown, it was considered from an academic-practitioner perspective to explore leadership behaviour, team effectiveness, technological flexibility, work engagement and performance.RESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: Specifically, remote workers were sampled online via social media (n = 229). Structural equation modelling methods were used to analyse the data, also controlling optimism and pessimism at the item level.MAIN FINDINGS: The results showed that the resources of leadership behaviour and team effectiveness had direct positive paths to work engagement and that work engagement had a positive path to two performance factors: adaptivity and proactivity. Furthermore, there were significant indirect relationship present from leadership behaviour and team effectiveness to both adaptability and proactivity through work engagementPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: From the evidence it seems appropriate to recommend that organisations explore fostering the employee job resources in order to positively impact work engagement, which in turn can have beneficial performance outcomes for organisations who have employees working remotely whilst the COVID-19 regulations remain in force.CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: This study was unique as it sampled from employees 'locked down' during a pandemic and gauged their perceptions of leadership behaviour, team effectiveness, technological flexibility, work engagement and performance. <![CDATA[<b>Erratum: Mental health research in African organisations: Advancing theory and practice</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100017&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has taken the world by storm. Little is known about leadership, motivation and employee performance during pandemics and associated lockdownsRESEARCH PURPOSE: The current study investigated a model of leadership behaviour, team effectiveness, technological flexibility, work engagement and performance in the context of a 'hard lockdown' in South AfricaMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting lockdown, it was considered from an academic-practitioner perspective to explore leadership behaviour, team effectiveness, technological flexibility, work engagement and performance.RESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: Specifically, remote workers were sampled online via social media (n = 229). Structural equation modelling methods were used to analyse the data, also controlling optimism and pessimism at the item level.MAIN FINDINGS: The results showed that the resources of leadership behaviour and team effectiveness had direct positive paths to work engagement and that work engagement had a positive path to two performance factors: adaptivity and proactivity. Furthermore, there were significant indirect relationship present from leadership behaviour and team effectiveness to both adaptability and proactivity through work engagementPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: From the evidence it seems appropriate to recommend that organisations explore fostering the employee job resources in order to positively impact work engagement, which in turn can have beneficial performance outcomes for organisations who have employees working remotely whilst the COVID-19 regulations remain in force.CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: This study was unique as it sampled from employees 'locked down' during a pandemic and gauged their perceptions of leadership behaviour, team effectiveness, technological flexibility, work engagement and performance. <![CDATA[<b>Erratum: Differential item functioning of the CESD-R and GAD-7 in African and white working adults</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100018&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has taken the world by storm. Little is known about leadership, motivation and employee performance during pandemics and associated lockdownsRESEARCH PURPOSE: The current study investigated a model of leadership behaviour, team effectiveness, technological flexibility, work engagement and performance in the context of a 'hard lockdown' in South AfricaMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting lockdown, it was considered from an academic-practitioner perspective to explore leadership behaviour, team effectiveness, technological flexibility, work engagement and performance.RESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: Specifically, remote workers were sampled online via social media (n = 229). Structural equation modelling methods were used to analyse the data, also controlling optimism and pessimism at the item level.MAIN FINDINGS: The results showed that the resources of leadership behaviour and team effectiveness had direct positive paths to work engagement and that work engagement had a positive path to two performance factors: adaptivity and proactivity. Furthermore, there were significant indirect relationship present from leadership behaviour and team effectiveness to both adaptability and proactivity through work engagementPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: From the evidence it seems appropriate to recommend that organisations explore fostering the employee job resources in order to positively impact work engagement, which in turn can have beneficial performance outcomes for organisations who have employees working remotely whilst the COVID-19 regulations remain in force.CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: This study was unique as it sampled from employees 'locked down' during a pandemic and gauged their perceptions of leadership behaviour, team effectiveness, technological flexibility, work engagement and performance. <![CDATA[<b>Generational differences in psychological ownership</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100019&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: Several generational groups are employed in the workplace today, each with distinctly different attitudes, values and work behaviours. Little is known about how generational cohorts differ in terms of psychological ownershipRESEARCH PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the measurement equivalence of the South African Psychological Ownership Questionnaire (SAPOS) across three generational cohorts (Baby Boomers, Generation Xers and Generation YersMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Before meaningful inferences and comparisons can be made about psychological ownership across the generational cohorts, it is essential to ensure that the psychological ownership scale measures the same trait across all three generational cohortsRESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted with a convenience sample of 945 skilled respondents employed in various public and private organisations employing a multigroup confirmatory factorial analytical approachMAIN FINDINGS: The tripartite model of the SAPOS, comprising identity, responsibility and autonomy, was confirmed across the three generational cohort. Measurement invariance was established on configural, metric and scalar level across the three generational cohortsPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: The three generational cohorts perceive the items as was measured by the psychological ownership scale in the same way. Meaningful comparisons can thus be made between the groups and organisations can tailor their interventions to enhance the levels of psychological ownership of each of these generational cohortsCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: This study is one of the first to provide empirical evidence of generational differences in respect of psychological ownership and to evaluate the measurement equivalence of a psychological ownership inventory across generational cohorts <![CDATA[<b>Doing gender well: Women's perceptions on gender equality and career progression in the South African security industry</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100020&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: Although significant progress has been made globally in gender equality, women still occupy less political influence, fewer leadership positions and yield less control over their careers than most men. Gender inequality is evident in male-dominated work environments such as the security industryRESEARCH PURPOSE: This study reflects on women's perceptions on gender equality and career progression in the South African security industryMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: In post-democracy South Africa, women are categorised as previously disadvantaged, therefore a priority group in terms of advancement. However, it is still unclear, from the narratives of the women themselves, how their career progression is encumbered in the milieu of the security industryRESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: Through qualitative one-on-one semi-structured interviews, 15 women, working in the security industry, shared their experiences concerning gender equality and career progression. Data were analysed thematically, guided by the context of the gendered security professionMAIN FINDINGS: The findings reveal that women experience slower career progression than men in terms of rejection and work allocation. Moreover, negative perceptions of female leadership among colleagues was a factor hindering career progressionPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: This study argues by doing gender well, equality in the security workplace can be obtained. Furthermore, the study encourages South African security managers to recognise how aspects such as rejection, work allocation and a negative perception of female leadership may encumber the career progression of female security professionalsCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: The study contributes to scientific knowledge and discourse regarding women's perceptions on gender equality and career progression <![CDATA[<b>Sacrifice is a step beyond convenience: A review of convenience sampling in psychological research in Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100021&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: Articles from three African psychology journals were reviewed to indicate their use and reporting practices of convenience samplesRESEARCH PURPOSE: Method-relevant sections of empirical research reports (qualitative, quantitative, mixed method, etc.) were categorised to establish current method use and reporting practices as well as the methodological standards of convenience sampling in three African psychology journals from 2018 to mid-2020MOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Convenience sampling is the most popularly used sampling method in psychology. However, little attention is paid to sampling composition and sampling methods in articles, which influences trustworthiness, generalisability and replication of results. Psychology is also experiencing criticism because of the lack of non-Western, educated, industrialised, rich and democratic (WEIRD) samplesRESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: A systematised review design was followed to purposively collect and categorise articles that used convenience samples as a sampling approach (n = 139) from the South African Journal of Industrial Psychology, the South African Journal of Psychology and the Journal of Psychology in AfricaMAIN FINDINGS: General reporting practices included sample size, gender, country, sample source (e.g. university) and age. Other sample characteristics indicate that studies were primarily conducted with South Africans speaking Afrikaans or English. English was mainly used to collect data from primarily black (African) and white (Caucasian) racial groups. Participants were largely female from university or college. Some sample differences such as sample size were also noted between qualitative and quantitative research methods. African journals' reporting practices of sample characteristics were found to include standards and frequencies similar to or higher than those of international journalsPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: Journals should pay attention to their role in influencing the reporting practices and standards of convenience samples and consider incorporating the presented categoriesCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: The use of convenience sampling in African psychology journals is presented along with the potential of African research to provide non-WEIRD samples in psychology. Recommendations for improving the use of this sampling method are highlighted <![CDATA[<b>A systems psychodynamic description of clinical psychologists' role transition towards becoming organisational development consultants</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100022&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: Clinical psychologists' transition from practising in a clinical context to a large organisation implies an intensely experienced professional identity shiftRESEARCH PURPOSE: To provide a systems psychodynamic description of the lived experiences of a group of clinical psychologists' role transition towards becoming organisational development (OD) consultantsMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Although the role of clinical psychologists in organisations is theoretically explicated, limited research exists on their role transition experiences. Their lack of theoretical knowledge about and experience in organisational psychology make them vulnerable for exclusion and isolationRESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: A hermeneutic phenomenological research design using a collective case study, consisting of eight clinical psychologists, was used. The data gathering methods included a Listening Post and socio-analytic interviews. Systems psychodynamic data analysis was performedMAIN FINDINGS: The manifesting themes related to experiences of diverse and intense anxiety, defensive structures, role, task, boundary and authorisation conflicts as well as solitary pilgrimages. Participants experienced an attack on their personal and professional identities, a sense of being overwhelmed, excluded and isolated from their colleagues and peersPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: The findings will facilitate clinical psychologists' transition into OD roles and organisations' awareness of their identity challengesCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: Although employing clinical psychologists in OD roles is practised in many large organisations, the findings suggest that their transition into this role is underestimated in terms of emotional intensity <![CDATA[<b>Experience of meaningful work for self-employed individuals</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100023&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: This article is about the experience of meaningful work for self-employed individualsRESEARCH PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to explore how meaningful work is experienced by self-employed individualsMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Research tends to focus on meaningful work from either the formally employed individual or the organisational perspective, and very little research has included the perspective of self-employed individuals. The number of employed individuals considering self-employment, however, has increased since the outbreak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which triggered a global recession that has resulted in a substantial number of job losses and questionable job security in various employment sectorsRESEARCH DESIGN/APPROACH AND METHOD: This was an interactive qualitative study to explore the experience of meaningful work for self-employed individuals. A social constructionist paradigm was adopted to study participants' attitudes towards their work, their values and feelings, what drives them and their perceptions of meaningful work. Data was collected and analysed from a purposive sample of five self-employed individualsMAIN FINDINGS: This study revealed that purpose is the primary driver in self-employed individuals' experience of meaningful work. Purpose facilitates feeling stimulated and creative expression. Cooperation encourages participation in meaningful work. Fulfilment is the primary outcome of self-employed individuals' experience of meaningful workPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: Self-employed individuals can create opportunities for meaningful work. This study provides an understanding of the experience of self-employed individuals when they perform work they consider meaningful and the implications thereofCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: This study complemented existing literature on meaningful work and literature on self-employment, and may facilitate the experience of meaningfulness by the growing number of self-employed individuals <![CDATA[<b>Impact of positive practices on turnover intention, in-role performance and organisational citizenship behaviour</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100024&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: The literature on positive organisational scholarship (POS) could offer valuable suggestions on how to rekindle a sense of positivity amongst teachers. Under the POS umbrella, the current study specifically focusses on positive practices, as the research study shows the importance of a positive school climate for teachers and learnersRESEARCH PURPOSE: This study set out to inspect associations amongst positive practices, turnover intention, in-role performance and organisational citizenship behaviours (OCBs) (towards others and the organisationMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Although positive practices is not a novel construct, scientific enquiry into the topic has been scarceRESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: A cross-sectional survey design with 258 secondary school teachers from the Sedibeng East and West districts was used. The Positive Practices, Turnover Intention, OCB and In-Role Behaviour scales were administered. Structural equation modelling was used for hypotheses testingMAIN FINDINGS: The results of this study confirmed the negative association between positive practices and turnover intention, whereas positive associations were established amongst positive practices, in-role performance (to a lesser extent) and the two different types of OCBs used in this studyPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: Organisations are faced with two options: create a respectful, supportive, caring, inspirational, meaningful and forgiving organisational environment for employees and see them prosper and take the organisation to greater heights, or treat them poorly and bear the consequencesCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: This study makes a valuable contribution to POS through the assessment of outcomes associated with positive practices that have not been studied previously <![CDATA[<b>The influence of compensation, training and development on organisational citizenship behaviour</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100025&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: Extra role behaviours, also known as organisational citizenship behaviours, are very important for an organisation's success. Organisational objectives can be efficiently achieved when employees are willing to do work that is beyond their job description. Organisations with employees with high organisational citizenship behaviour have a competitive advantage and are highly productiveRESEARCH PURPOSE: The study investigated the influence of compensation and training and development on organisational citizenship behaviour amongst academic staff at a rural-based South African institution of higher learningMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Research on the influence of compensation and training and development on organisational citizenship behaviour is not new. However, the studies were carried out in different sectors outside South Africa. There is still scant information known about citizenship behaviour in the higher education sector in general and in South African rural-based institutions of higher learning in particularRESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: The study was based on a quantitative approach, which used a cross-sectional research design. A sample of 152 academic staff participated in this study. Data were gathered using a self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, correlation and multiple regression analysis technique were conducted using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 26.0MAIN FINDINGS: The findings revealed a significant relationship between compensation and organisational citizenship behaviour. A significant correlation was also found between training and development and organisational citizenship behaviour. However, in multiple regression analysis, compensation was found to be the only predictor of organisational citizenship behaviour. Moreover, no significant difference in levels of organisational citizenship behaviour between men and women was foundPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: The management of the institution should continuously review its compensation or rewards policies to enhance organisational citizenship behaviour amongst the academic staff. Institutions of higher learning should also compensate their employees and develop them fairly regardless of gender in order to promote organisational citizenship behaviourCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: The study's findings will assist the university management in making strategic decisions on compensation systems and staff development that will enhance the citizenship behaviour of the academic staff <![CDATA[<b>Regulating emotions at work: The role of emotional intelligence in the process of conflict, job crafting and performance</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100026&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: This study aimed to investigate the role of emotional intelligence (EQ) in the process of workplace conflict, job crafting and job performanceRESEARCH PURPOSE: To explore the relationship between self-focused EQ, task conflict, task crafting and in-role performance, as well as the relationship between other-focused EQ, relational conflict, relational crafting and extra-role performanceMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Peer relationships and conflict may have an impact on work performance and enabling employees to manage relationships and conflict at work and may contribute to better overall productivityRESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: A quantitative research design with cross-sectional analysis utilising PROCESS moderated mediation was followed in this study. The sample consisted of 293 employees across various industries in South AfricaMAIN FINDINGS: The results showed that task crafting mediates the relationship between task conflict and in-role performance, whilst self-focused EQ moderated the relationship between task conflict, task crafting and in-role performance in the second stage. Relational crafting further mediated the relationship between task conflict and extra-role performancePRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: The study shows that job crafting is important for managing conflict on performance, whilst recognising self-focused EQ as an important predisposition to initiate self-driven behaviour that employees embark on in order to perform wellCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: By analysing these relationships, organisations may better equip their employees with the internal resources needed to perform. Furthermore, an investigation into emotion regulation methods combined with proactive workplace behaviours increases our understanding of how to support and promote positive interactions and proactivity at work <![CDATA[<b>COVID-19 and the future of work and organisational psychology</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100027&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused a 'coronafication' of research and academia, including the instrumentalisation of academic research towards the demands of society and governments. Whilst an enormous number of special issues and articles are devoted on the topic, there are few fundamental reflections on how the current pandemic will affect science and work and organisational psychology in the long runRESEARCH PURPOSE: The current overview, written by a group of members of the Future of Work and Organisational Psychology (FOWOP) Movement, focuses on the central issues relating to work and organisational psychology that have emerged as a result of the COVID-19 crisis MOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: The study discusses the inability of dominant theories in work and organisational psychology to understand contemporary problems and the need to advance the theoretical realm of work psychology. We also discuss the need for pluralism in methodologies to understand the post-COVID-19 workplace, the urgency of attending to neglected voices and populations during the COVID-19 crisis and teaching during COVID-19. RESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: This article uses conceptual argumentation.MAIN FINDINGS: The COVID-19 crisis forces work psychology to address at least its theorising, methods, unheard voices and teaching in the COVID-19 crisisPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: On the basis of this article, researchers and practitioners may be better aware of the neglected perspectives in the current pandemic.CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: This article adds to the understanding of the future directions for a sustainable Work and Organisational Psychology as an applied scientific discipline during and beyond the COVID-19 crisis. <![CDATA[<b>Counselling preparedness and responsiveness of industrial psychologists in the face of COVID-19</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100028&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has brought to the forefront the need for industrial-organisational psychologists (IOPs) and organisations to place an emphasis on employees' mental and physical health at all timesRESEARCH PURPOSE: The purpose of the research was to determine how prepared IOPs are to counsel employees during the pandemic and how responsive they are to provide counsellingMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: It is not clear to what extent such counselling is being practised by IOPs in the workplace during the COVID-19 pandemicRESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: A qualitative approach was used to gain an understanding of registered South African IOPs' experiences of workplace counselling, particularly during the time of the COVID-19 pandemicMAIN FINDINGS: Regarding preparedness, we found that IOPs are ill-prepared to counsel in the workplace. Preparedness was influenced by participants' counselling education, skills and knowledge; experience; convictions about counselling; and psychological and organisational preparedness. Whilst some IOPs did engage in more counselling during the COVID-19 pandemic, most reverted to mitigating actions such as referrals, wellness management, equipping managers and change initiativesPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: The results of this study indicate that, under pandemic conditions, there is an increased need for counselling practices within the workplace and that IOPs should explore the ways in which they could play a more active role in such counsellingCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: Although we found that IOPs generally responded to employees' mental health needs in a positive manner, there was a lack of counselling preparedness and responsiveness during the COVID-19 pandemic <![CDATA[<b>Is working from home the new workplace panacea? Lessons from the COVID-19 pandemic for the future world of work</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100029&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: The COVID-19 pandemic has forced millions of employees to work from home as governments implemented lockdownsRESEARCH PURPOSE: This study examined the impact of working exclusively from home on employee engagement and experience, and determined beneficial and distracting factorsMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Remote working trends have risen steeply since the onset of COVID-19 and are unlikely to taper off soon. Organisations need to understand the impact of remote work when reconsidering working arrangementsRESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: A dual-approach qualitative design was followed. The sample comprised 25 employees (N = 25) who were forced to work exclusively from home during COVID-19. Data were collected through semi-structured interviewsMAIN FINDINGS: Working from home for protracted periods rendered paradoxical outcomes. Employees could work effectively with improved employee engagement and experience, but there were challenges rendering adverse effects. The experienced benefits of working from home created expectations that this practice would continue in future, along with some office workPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: Organisations need to continue, though not exclusively, with work-from-home arrangements. The ideal ratio of remote work to office work was seen as two to three days per week. However, support and cultural practices would have to be put in placeCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: The COVID-19 lockdown provided a unique environment to study remote work. For the first time, employees and organisations were placed in a situation where they could experience working from home in a stark and compulsory form, devoid of idealistic fantasies or romanticism <![CDATA[<b>A Rasch analysis of the fear of coronavirus-19 scale in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100030&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: Investigating the psychological aspects associated with the coronavirus disease might be important for psychological interventions. The fear of coronavirus-19 scale (FCV-19S) has emerged as a popular measure of coronavirus-19-related fear. However, its psychometric properties remain unknown in South AfricaRESEARCH PURPOSE: This study set out to investigate the internal validity of the FCV-19S in the South African context using the Rasch measurement modelMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: There have been some mixed findings on the psychometric properties of the FCV-19S in international research and its psychometric properties are yet to be investigated in South Africa. Investigating these psychometric properties can provide psychometric information to practitioners who wish to use this instrument in the South African contextRESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: A cross-sectional survey research design was used. The FCV-19S was administered to 159 adults. The Rasch partial credit model was applied to the item responses to investigate the measurement quality of the FCV-19SMAIN FINDINGS: The FCV-19S showed somewhat satisfactory internal validity in the South African context within the boundaries of the current sample, and clarity was obtained on the mixed findings obtained in the previous research. Potential shortcomings of the scale were identified that might reduce its applicability to the South African contextPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: Our results provide tentative support for the internal validity of the FCV-19S in South Africa. Suggestions for the improvement of the scale are madeCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: This is one of the first studies to investigate the internal validity of the FCV-19S in South Africa. Our results hold important implications for the continued use of this scale and have helped to clarify some of the mixed findings obtained in previous research <![CDATA[<b>A temperature reading of COVID-19 pandemic employee agility and resilience in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100031&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: Employee agility and resilience are central to the flourishing of employee and organisational life. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic amplified stressors and added new challenges for employees in South Africa. The study reported here provides a temperature reading of the agility and resilience of South African employees in the context of the pandemicRESEARCH PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to engage in a temperature reading of South African employees' agility and resilience during the COVID-19 pandemicMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: The study was motivated by the need to understand how South African employees fare in terms of their agility and resilience levels in the context of profound social and economic disruptive events such as the COVID-19 pandemicRESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: A cross-sectional survey design was used employing quantitative methodologies. A total of 185 permanently employed respondents from South Africa were conveniently sampled. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the dataMAIN FINDINGS: Whilst respondents reported high resilience and agility capacity, the findings also suggest that respondents' gender, age, upskilling intentions, size of employer, organisational communication and individual renewal strategies influence their resilience and agility behavioursPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: The study prompts a discussion on how practitioners can better serve the wellness agenda of organisational life during sustained periods of organisational stressCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: This study extends the theoretical and practical debate on employee agility and resilience in South African context <![CDATA[<b>Crisis management and the industrial psychologist: Why do we shy away?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632021000100032&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ORIENTATION: Employee agility and resilience are central to the flourishing of employee and organisational life. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic amplified stressors and added new challenges for employees in South Africa. The study reported here provides a temperature reading of the agility and resilience of South African employees in the context of the pandemicRESEARCH PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to engage in a temperature reading of South African employees' agility and resilience during the COVID-19 pandemicMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: The study was motivated by the need to understand how South African employees fare in terms of their agility and resilience levels in the context of profound social and economic disruptive events such as the COVID-19 pandemicRESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: A cross-sectional survey design was used employing quantitative methodologies. A total of 185 permanently employed respondents from South Africa were conveniently sampled. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the dataMAIN FINDINGS: Whilst respondents reported high resilience and agility capacity, the findings also suggest that respondents' gender, age, upskilling intentions, size of employer, organisational communication and individual renewal strategies influence their resilience and agility behavioursPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: The study prompts a discussion on how practitioners can better serve the wellness agenda of organisational life during sustained periods of organisational stressCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: This study extends the theoretical and practical debate on employee agility and resilience in South African context