Scielo RSS <![CDATA[SA Journal of Industrial Psychology]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=2071-076320220001&lang=pt vol. 48 num. 1 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>The influence of emotional intelligence and resilience on work engagement amongst nurses in public hospitals</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632022000100001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt ORIENTATION: It has become vital for hospitals to create supportive and conducive working environments. With the reported adverse working conditions in public hospitals, it would be prudent to consider the stimulating factors of work engagement. This research suggests that personal resources such as resilience and emotional intelligence may cushion individuals from being disengaged by enabling them to manage job demandsRESEARCH PURPOSE: The study aimed to determine the extent to which a combination of positive aspects and resources of emotional intelligence and resilience may influence work engagementMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: The study was inspired by Demerouti and Bakker who in 2011 signalled that employees become susceptible to health impairments when job and personal resources are likely to be limited. Expanding employee personal resources may thus effectively influence work engagementRESEARCH APPROACH, DESIGN AND METHOD: The study employed a cross-sectional quantitative survey by means of self-administered questionnaires. The sample consisted of 252 nurses from the Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality, South Africa. Data were analysed using the SmartPLS programmeMAIN FINDINGS: Emotional intelligence influences work engagement through resilience. The strong direct pathway between emotional intelligence and work engagement was noteworthyPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATION: Managers may focus their attention on developing aspects of emotional intelligence and enhance resilience as a way of improving work engagementCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: The findings add literature to the body of knowledge focusing on expanding personal resource as a way to enhance work engagement amongst nurses in public hospitals <![CDATA[<b>Employee responses to pay transparency</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632022000100002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt ORIENTATION: Pay transparency is a controversial but understudied topic. The emerging research is developing theory and exploring the impact on organisational outcomes; however, our understanding of employees' perceptions of and responses to pay transparency is limitedRESEARCH PURPOSE: This research study aimed to explore what employees understand of the term 'pay transparency' and how they respond to itMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: This study contributes to a better understanding of how employees in South African organisations perceive pay transparencyRESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 employees of four organisations with different pay transparency practices. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the dataMAIN FINDINGS: Employees in this study have diverse understandings and views of pay transparency and relatively low expectations of employers. However, they can thoughtfully conceptualise the potential risks and benefits of greater pay transparency. The metaphor of the sport fan is useful to explain this phenomenon - standing at the side-lines with strong opinions but removed from the actionPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: Understanding how employees perceive pay transparency can help employers and practitioners to navigate their pay transparency approachCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: As the only known qualitative study in the pay transparency field, this study gives unique insights into employees' perceptions of and responses to pay transparency <![CDATA[<b>Positive affect and resilience: Exploring the role of self-efficacy and self-regulation. A serial mediation model</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632022000100003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt ORIENTATION: Resilience has become an invaluable asset for female leaders in higher education given the numerous barriers they have to overcome. Despite this, leadership development programmes tend to overlook the importance of resilience enhancing factors when offering support interventions for female leadersRESEARCH PURPOSE: This study explores the role of psychological resources such as positive affect, self-efficacy and self-regulation and the processes between them that explain resilienceMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Understanding how psychological resources can work independently and through each other to influence resilience, can prove beneficial for higher education institutions. This information can be used to design female leadership support programmes that enhance the appropriate psychological resources, which may assist with increasing resilienceRESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: This study employed a cross-sectional survey design with a non-probability sample of female leaders (n = 255) across multiple higher education institutions in South Africa. Mplus was used to determine the goodness-of-fit associated with the different constructs. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 27 and PROCESS macro by Hayes were used to conduct a series of statistical tests, including serial mediation analysisMAIN FINDINGS: Although the relationship between positive affect and resilience was mediated by self-efficacy and self-regulation (individually and in serial), positive affect had a positive association with resilience independent of the three indirect effectsPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: Higher education institutions can strengthen the resilience of female leaders through interventions that utilise positive affect, self-efficacy and self-regulationCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADDITION: This study contributes towards research on the role of psychological resources in the context of female leadership and aims to explain the processes that may influence resilience <![CDATA[<b>Validity of the career embeddedness scale as predictor of affective commitment</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632022000100004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt ORIENTATION: In times of rapid change, organisations have a dire need for workers who remain psychologically attached and committed to their work for optimal sustainable organisational performance and survivalRESEARCH PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to explore the construct validity of the Career Embeddedness Scale (CES) as predictor of individuals' affective commitmentMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: There is a paucity of research regarding the construct validity of the CES and whether it predicts an individual's affective commitmentRESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: The study involved a cross-sectional quantitative survey on a sample of employees in the services industry. The sample consisted of African (South African = 70% and Zimbabwean = 15%) and European (15%) participants (N = 290), with a mean age of 38.58 yearsMAIN FINDINGS: Confirmatory factory analysis (CFA) analysis provided evidence of the construct validity of the CES in predicting affective commitmentPRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: The use of the CES measure of the degree to which organisational career support conditions fulfil individuals' psychological career needs potentially provides opportunity for engagement with the organisation and individual on career development issues in response to workplace changes that potentially affect employees' psychological attachment to the organisationCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: The study contributed to the career development research literature by providing valuable psychometric information on the CES and its application in the person-environment (P-E) fit theory and work context <![CDATA[<b>A conceptual analysis of the use of systems-psychodynamics as an organisation development intervention: A neuroscientific perspective</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632022000100005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt ORIENTATION: Systems-psychodynamics as a consulting stance offers learning experiences that not only have links with the first organisation development interventions but also remains a popular approach for organisational consultation. Here, the argument is made that neuroscientific principles, as embedded in neuropsychotherapy, offer a lens for evaluating and improving the effectiveness of systems-psychodynamic interventionsRESEARCH PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to hypothesise about the effectiveness of systems-psychodynamic interventions, and to offer propositions for improvementMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Studies on the effectiveness of systems-psychodynamic interventions from outside the same network of science-practitioners, are limited. Furthermore, no evidence of a similar study using a neuroscientific framework could be found in the English literatureRESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: This was a conceptual analysis with theory adaption as an approach. Systems-psychodynamics was chosen as domain theory and was discussed first, followed by neuropsychotherapy as method theoryMAIN FINDINGS: It was hypothesised that, using the lens of neuropsychotherapy, systems-psychodynamics - with its focus on insight into unconscious processes - would most likely enhance fear-based learning. To facilitate transformational learning, the experience could be augmented through a better alignment with neuroscientific principlesPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: There is a need to augment the role of the consultant as science-practitioner with the skills of a reflective practitioner. This will enable consultants to continuously critique and adapt preferred interventions, by integrating new neuroscience-related knowledge in those interventionsCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: This study contributes to the literature on organisation development interventions, and the reflective practice of the science-practitioner <![CDATA[<b>Exploring impression management tactics within the Afrikaans Coloured culture in a formal setting</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632022000100006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt ORIENTATION: Impression management (IM) tactics are displayed by Afrikaans Coloured individuals in formal settings. The formal setting (workplace) entails interactions with colleagues and supervisorsRESEARCH PURPOSE: Explore and identify IM tactics displayed in the Afrikaans Coloured culture in a formal settingMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: This study forms part of a bigger research project where research has been conducted on different cultural groups (e.g. White Afrikaans, Zulu and Tswana) in order to develop a social desirable measuring instrument specifically for the South African contextRESEARCH APPROACH, DESIGN AND METHOD: A qualitative research design was utilised based on a phenomenological approach, following an emic perspective. The sample consisted of (n = 11) Afrikaans Coloured individuals, with a tertiary qualification within South African organisations that comprised employees more than 50 people, situated in the Western Cape and Northern Cape provinces. For data collection, semi-structured interviews were conducted. Qualitative data analysis steps of Creswell was used to analyse dataMAIN FINDINGS: Results indicate that Africans Coloured individuals use different tactics when impressing colleagues and supervisors in the workplacePRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: This study provides the management of organisations the essential knowledge on the IM tactics that Afrikaans Coloured employees display in a formal settingCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: This study contributed to the body of knowledge regarding IM tactics that Afrikaans Coloured employees display. This study might enable organisations to better understand and manage individuals from this cultural group <![CDATA[<b>Developing a brief acceptance and commitment therapy model for industrial psychologists</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632022000100007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt ORIENTATION: Mental health distress is on the rise, which has significant implications for labour productivity. Industrial psychologists, who are equipped to offer work-based counselling, can play a vital role in alleviating this burdenRESEARCH PURPOSE: This study was an investigation of current literature on industrial psychologists as counsellors, with a focus on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) as a framework to deliver brief work-based counselling. The aim was to offer a practical model of counselling, derived from the literature, for industrial psychologists to perform work-based counsellingMOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: There is a paucity of literature pertaining to evidence-based guidelines that industrial psychologists can follow to provide counselling. This study attempts to expand industrial psychologists' counselling skill set by proposing an ACT intervention that can be applied as a brief counselling process in the workplaceRESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: A systematic literature review of three separate literature streams yielded 1297 publications. After further analysis, 25 publications that met the criteria for relevance and quality were considered to create a model for workplace counsellingMAIN FINDINGS: Attention to the role of industrial psychologists as counsellors dwindled after the 1960s but has recently been given renewed attention by South African scholars. The literature review of experimental ACT designs revealed evidence-based guidelines that were combined to create the ACT for Work Well-being ModelPRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: The ACT for Work Well-being Model is a brief counselling protocol to offer systematic steps that industrial psychologists can implement during brief work-based counselling to address anxiety and depressive symptomsCONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: The proposed model is designed to stimulate further empirical validation and ensure evidence-based practice <![CDATA[<b>Social well-being, job satisfaction, organisational citizenship behaviour and intentions to leave in a utility organisation</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632022000100008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt ORIENTATION: Employee social well-being is likely to influence individual and organisational outcomes, especially in African countries where a high premium is often placed on one's personhood being rooted in one's relations with others RESEARCH PURPOSE: This study investigated the associations between social well-being, job satisfaction, organisational citizenship behaviour and intentions to leave in a South African utility organisation MOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Given the history of relationships amongst diverse people in South Africa, social well-being seems to be a critical component of the overall well-being of employees. However, few studies in South Africa have focused on social well-being in organisational contexts. RESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: A cross-sectional survey design was used, targeting permanent employees in a South African utility organisation. Consenting participants (N = 403) completed previously validated measures of social well-being, job satisfaction, organisational citizenship behaviour and intentions to leave. Structural equation modelling was performed to test hypotheses. MAIN FINDINGS: Social well-being was positively associated with job satisfaction and organisational citizenship behaviour and negatively associated with intentions to leave. Social well-being indirectly affected organisational citizenship behaviour and intention to leave through job (dis)satisfaction. PRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: Managers and human resources practitioners are alerted to practical ways of sustaining employees' social well-being such as by implementing tailor-made policies that support social aspects of well-being and by ensuring the alignment of well-being programmes with changing circumstances in the modern world of work. ORIGINALITY/VALUE-ADD: This study illuminated social well-being associations with selected outcomes in a developing African country workplace context. <![CDATA[<b>Social well-being, job satisfaction, organisational citizenship behaviour and intentions to leave in a utility organisation</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632022000100009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt ORIENTATION: Employee social well-being is likely to influence individual and organisational outcomes, especially in African countries where a high premium is often placed on one's personhood being rooted in one's relations with others. RESEARCH PURPOSE: This study investigated the associations between social well-being, job satisfaction, organisational citizenship behaviour and intentions to leave in a South African utility organisation. MOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Given the history of relationships amongst diverse people in South Africa, social well-being seems to be a critical component of the overall well-being of employees. However, few studies in South Africa have focused on social well-being in organisational contexts.. RESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: A cross-sectional survey design was used, targeting permanent employees in a South African utility organisation. Consenting participants (N = 403) completed previously validated measures of social well-being, job satisfaction, organisational citizenship behaviour and intentions to leave. Structural equation modelling was performed to test hypotheses. MAIN FINDINGS: Social well-being was positively associated with job satisfaction and organisational citizenship behaviour and negatively associated with intentions to leave. Social well-being indirectly affected organisational citizenship behaviour and intention to leave through job (dis)satisfaction. PRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: Managers and human resources practitioners are alerted to practical ways of sustaining employees' social well-being such as by implementing tailor-made policies that support social aspects of well-being and by ensuring the alignment of well-being programmes with changing circumstances in the modern world of work. ORIGINALITY/VALUE-ADD: This study illuminated social well-being associations with selected outcomes in a developing African country workplace context. <![CDATA[<b>Psychometric properties of a workplace spirituality measure</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-07632022000100010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt ORIENTATION: Scholars are encouraged to provide contextualised definitions of spirituality (e.g. workplace spirituality) and validate measures using non-academic samples and advanced statistics. RESEARCH PURPOSE: This study aimed to determine (1) the dimensionality associated with a measure of workplace spirituality and (2) whether the estimated primary factor scores (alignment with organisational values, meaningful work, sense of community) outperforms the prediction of the estimated scores for perceived employee performance compared with the estimated scores for the general factor (workplace spirituality). MOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Valid measures of workplace spirituality are required for conducting research to advance our understanding of its relationship with organisational outcomes. RESEARCH APPROACH/DESIGN AND METHOD: Using a cross-sectional survey design, 789 public servants completed measures on workplace spirituality and perceived employee performance. A three-stage process was followed to investigate (1) the basic internal assessment qualities of the measure, (2) the added-value of the subscales (i.e., alignment with organisational values, meaningful work, sense of community) to the model, and (3) the assessment of the external validity of the measure in relation to an external variable (in this case perceived employee performance). Different indices are consulted during the three stages to determine (1) whether the measurement in question is essentially unidimensional in nature and (2) whether the estimated group factor scores are better predictors of the criterion than the estimated general factor scores. MAIN FINDINGS: The various indices suggested that the measure of workplace spirituality could be treated as multidimensional and essentially unidimensional in nature. The three primary factors (alignment with organisational values, meaningful work and sense of community) resulted in a significant (yet small) increase in accuracy of predicting the estimated scores associated with perceived employee performance compared with the prediction based on the estimated scores for the general factor (workplace spirituality). However, the presence of a strong general factor cannot be ignored, pointing to a measure that is also essentially unidimensional and to be scored accordingly - allowing for quick and accurate assessment of individuals' levels of workplace spirituality PRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: Applied researchers and practitioners should take note of the theoretical and statistical value associated with the subdimensions of workplace spirituality to better understand why these dimensions are predictors of employee performance. The results of the study emphasise the important role of both personal-level and organisational-level variables associated with workplace spirituality in relation to perceived employee performance. CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: The study suggests that this measure of workplace spirituality can be treated as essentially unidimensional and multidimensional in nature - depending on the purpose of the assessment (fine-grained versus general). In addition, the present study provides evidence of the usefulness in employing novel procedures to determine the dimensionality of an instrument using external validity evidence.