Scielo RSS <![CDATA[SA Crime Quarterly]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=1991-387720160002&lang=pt vol. num. 56 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>New partnerships in publishing and politics</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1991-38772016000200001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Policing the private: Social barriers to the effective policing of domestic violence</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1991-38772016000200002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The limited ability of police to assist victims of domestic violence is often viewed as an institutional failure; a consequence of a lack of resources or inadequate training. This article presents key findings from a qualitative study of perceptions of and attitudes towards domestic violence in the South African township of Khayelitsha that highlight the complexity of responding to this form of violence. The research found that prevailing social norms and beliefs in Khayelitsha prevent domestic violence victims from seeking help from the police and that, unless there is a change in social norms, it is unlikely that there will be an increase in the reporting of cases of domestic violence. <![CDATA[<b>Memories of the 'inside': Conditions in South African women's prisons</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1991-38772016000200003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The inadequate conditions of South Africa's correctional facilities are well known. Health care, sanitation, food provision, access to education and reading materials, and, in particular, overcrowding are considerable challenges faced by the Department of Correctional Services (DCS). Based on interviews with former prisoners, this article retrospectively examines the conditions under which female inmates are incarcerated in South Africa. Findings show that prison conditions in some female correctional facilities are poor and impact negatively on prisoners during, and sometimes after, their incarceration. ('Prisons' and 'correctional facilities' are used interchangeably in this article.) <![CDATA[<b>Risky localities: Measuring socioeconomic characteristics of high murder areas</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1991-38772016000200004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Every day, on average, more than 49 people are murdered in South Africa. A better understanding of the demographics of locations with high murder and other crime rates could assist the development of initiatives to reduce them. It could also provide the basis for research into how social structures and relationships affect violence reduction. This article explores the hypothesis that the risk of murder is associated with certain demographic characteristics in particular locations. It proposes a method for analysing the demographic characteristics of police precincts in relation to the murder rate, and provides a summary of initial results. The article concludes with a discussion on the usefulness and limitations of this approach. <![CDATA[<b>Private prosecutions in Zimbabwe: Victim participation in the criminal justice system</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1991-38772016000200005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Two recent developments have changed the face of private prosecutions in Zimbabwe. Firstly, the prosecutor-general had to decide: (1) whether private companies may institute private prosecutions; and (2) whether the prosecutor-general, if he had declined to prosecute, was obliged to issue a certificate to a crime victim to institute a private prosecution. Both questions were answered in the negative. Victims of crime challenged this in court and the Supreme Court ruled that the prosecutor-general is obliged to issue a certificate should he decline to prosecute. In response, the prosecutor-general adopted two strategies: (1) to apply to the Constitutional Court against the Supreme Court's ruling that he is obliged to issue such a certificate; and (2) to have the relevant sections of the Criminal Procedure and Evidence Act (CPEA) amended so that the law clearly states that he is not obliged to issue such a certificate, and that companies are not permitted to institute private prosecutions. This article argues that despite these recent amendments to the CPEA, there are cases where the prosecutor-general may be compelled to issue a certificate to a crime victim to institute a private prosecution. These developments are important for South Africa, as a South African non-governmental organisation has petitioned the courts and argued that a law prohibiting it from instituting private prosecutions is discriminatory and therefore unconstitutional. South African courts may find Zimbabwean case law helpful in resolving this issue. <![CDATA[<b>Interview with Phumeza Mlungwana, Social Justice Coalition</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1991-38772016000200006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Two recent developments have changed the face of private prosecutions in Zimbabwe. Firstly, the prosecutor-general had to decide: (1) whether private companies may institute private prosecutions; and (2) whether the prosecutor-general, if he had declined to prosecute, was obliged to issue a certificate to a crime victim to institute a private prosecution. Both questions were answered in the negative. Victims of crime challenged this in court and the Supreme Court ruled that the prosecutor-general is obliged to issue a certificate should he decline to prosecute. In response, the prosecutor-general adopted two strategies: (1) to apply to the Constitutional Court against the Supreme Court's ruling that he is obliged to issue such a certificate; and (2) to have the relevant sections of the Criminal Procedure and Evidence Act (CPEA) amended so that the law clearly states that he is not obliged to issue such a certificate, and that companies are not permitted to institute private prosecutions. This article argues that despite these recent amendments to the CPEA, there are cases where the prosecutor-general may be compelled to issue a certificate to a crime victim to institute a private prosecution. These developments are important for South Africa, as a South African non-governmental organisation has petitioned the courts and argued that a law prohibiting it from instituting private prosecutions is discriminatory and therefore unconstitutional. South African courts may find Zimbabwean case law helpful in resolving this issue.