Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=1445-737720190001&lang=pt vol. 19 num. 1 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Preface</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1445-73772019000100001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Technology and the End of Western Civilisation: Spengler's and Heidegger's Histories of Life/Being</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1445-73772019000100002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Spengler's work is typically represented as speculative philosophy of history. There is good reason, however, to consider much of his thought as preoccupied with existential and phenomenological questions about the nature and ends of human existence, rather than with history per se. In this paper, Spengler's work is considered in comparison with Heidegger's history of Being and analysis of technological modernity. It is argued that Spengler's considerable proximity to much of Heidegger's thought compels us to reconsider the nature and scope of Spengler's philosophical project. <![CDATA[<b>"Being Together" in Learning: A School Leadership Case Study Evoking the Relational Essence of Learning Design at the Australian Science and Mathematics School</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1445-73772019000100003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt In this report on an interview-based school case study undertaken with seven school leaders using component theory analysis and the hermeneutic method, we reveal the relational essence of learning design at the Australian Science and Mathematics School. The phenomenon of learning togetherness presents, forged by deliberately practised notions of contributive leadership within open learning spaces and ongoing attention to new interdisciplinary curriculum forms. This case study highlights the phenomenological nature of a school that has been deliberately purposed for deep collaborative learning forms, respecting student and teacher ideas in the process, and marginalising habitual industrial school design forms that constrain effective student and teacher learning. The study has relevance for school leaders and teachers wishing to pursue new school design forms within enabling learning cultures that attend more closely to the learning needs of young people poised to enter the Third and Fourth Industrial Revolutions. <![CDATA[<b>A Psychobiographical Analysis of the Personality Traits of Steve Jobs's Entrepreneurial Life</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1445-73772019000100004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt There has been increasing interest in the attributes of successful entrepreneurs. Increasingly, too, research on entrepreneurship has focused on the identification of personality traits conducive to entrepreneurial success. The present study moves away from predicting entrepreneurial success and instead focuses on exploring and describing the personality traits of a successful entrepreneur, namely Steve Jobs. A psychobiographical case study design and qualitative approach were employed to explore the extent to which Steve Jobs displayed the personality traits identified by Rauch and Frese (2007). Data collection and analysis were guided by three linked sub-processes proposed by Miles and Huberman (2002), which include (a) data reduction, (b) data display and (c) conclusion drawing and verification. The findings of this study show that, over the course of the subject's life, the personality traits identified by Rauch and Frese (2007) as conducive to successful engagement in entrepreneurial activities were displayed, namely need for achievement, risk-taking, innovativeness, autonomy, internal locus of control, and self-efficacy. In so far as it can be argued that these personality traits inherently predisposed Steve Jobs to achieve the success he displayed as an entrepreneur, the findings of this study affirm the relevance of the personality trait perspective in describing and understanding the life course of successful entrepreneurs. <![CDATA[<b>Gender-as-Lived: The Coloniality of Gender in Schools as a Queer Teacher Listens in to Complicated Moments of Resistance</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1445-73772019000100005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt In this paper, I use Gloria Anzaldúa's (1987) narrative method of "autohistoría" in concert with theoretical analysis to reflect on my experiences as a queer teacher in the heteronormative United States schooling system. These reflections are aimed at unpacking the ways in which racialization, sexual orientation and coloniality are inseparably tied to living out one's gender. It is this phenomenon of "Gender-as-Lived" that I urge become a focus of identity development research in education studies and is my central concern in this post-intentional phenomenological study. Furthermore, Anzaldúa's conceptualization of the liminal zone of "nepantla" as an embodied and in-between space of resistance offers to transform the practice of teaching into a vocation of healing. <![CDATA[<b>Nietzsche: Bipolar Disorder and Creativity</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1445-73772019000100006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This essay, the last in a series, focuses on the relationship between Nietzsche's mental illness and his philosophical art. It is predicated upon my original diagnosis of his mental condition as bipolar affective disorder, which began in early adulthood and continued throughout his creative life. The kaleidoscopic mood shifts allowed him to see things from different perspectives and may have imbued his writings with passion rarely encountered in philosophical texts. At times hovering on the verge of psychosis, Nietzsche was able to gain access to unconscious images and the music of language, usually inhibited by the conscious mind. He reached many of his linguistic, psychological and philosophical insights by willing suspension of the rational. None of these, however, could have been communicated had he not tamed the subterranean psychic forces with his impressive discipline and hard work. <![CDATA[<b>Book Review - Husserl's Phenomenology of Intersubjectivity: Historical Interpretations and Contemporary Applications</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1445-73772019000100007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This essay, the last in a series, focuses on the relationship between Nietzsche's mental illness and his philosophical art. It is predicated upon my original diagnosis of his mental condition as bipolar affective disorder, which began in early adulthood and continued throughout his creative life. The kaleidoscopic mood shifts allowed him to see things from different perspectives and may have imbued his writings with passion rarely encountered in philosophical texts. At times hovering on the verge of psychosis, Nietzsche was able to gain access to unconscious images and the music of language, usually inhibited by the conscious mind. He reached many of his linguistic, psychological and philosophical insights by willing suspension of the rational. None of these, however, could have been communicated had he not tamed the subterranean psychic forces with his impressive discipline and hard work.