Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=1445-737720170001&lang=pt vol. 17 num. 1 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Editorial</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1445-73772017000100001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Drowning in muddied waters or swimming downstream? : A critical analysis of literature reviewing in a phenomenological study through an exploration of the lifeworld, reflexivity and role of the researcher</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1445-73772017000100002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This paper proceeds from examining the debate regarding the question of whether a systematic literature review should be undertaken within a qualitative research study to focusing specifically on the role of a literature review in a phenomenological study. Along with pointing to the pertinence of orienting to, articulating and delineating the phenomenon within a review of the literature, the paper presents an appropriate approach for this purpose. How a review of the existing literature should locate the focal phenomenon within a given context is illustrated by excerpts from the first author's literature review within a descriptive phenomenological study. Also discussed is the important issue of when the researcher should fully enter the attitude of the phenomenological reduction and how this may influence the study. <![CDATA[<b>An interpretative phenomenological analysis of schema modes in a single case of anorexia nervosa: Part 1 - Background, method, and child and parent modes</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1445-73772017000100003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Within the schema therapy model, schema modes are the shifting experiential states that individuals experience, and identification of these is central to case conceptualization and the planning of inter-ventions. Differences in the naming and descriptions of modes in the literature suggest the need for systematic phenomenological investigation. This paper presents the first part of an interpretative phenomenological analysis of schema modes within the single case of Linda (20), a young woman with anorexia nervosa. The analysis, which is based largely on transcripts of seven therapy sessions, yielded phenomenological accounts of her experience of a number of modes. In this, the first of two papers, a phenomenological account of her Child and Parent modes are presented and discussed. <![CDATA[<b>An interpretative phenomenological analysis of schema modes in a single case of anorexia nervosa: Part 2 - Coping modes, healthy adult mode, superordinate themes, and implications for research and practice</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1445-73772017000100004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt In schema therapy, the identification of schema modes is central to case conceptualization and the planning of interventions. Differences in the naming and description of specific modes in the literature suggest the need for systematic phenomenological investigation. This paper presents the second part of an interpretative phenomenological analysis of schema modes within the single case of Linda (20), a young woman with anorexia nervosa. In this paper, the focus is on Linda's Coping modes (of which an Anorexic Overcontroller mode was prominent, and to which parallels are drawn in the literature) and on several important superordinate themes: mode dyads, mode conflicts and balance of power, mode differentiation, and mode sequences. The findings support the value of the mode framework that is standard in schema therapy, based on Child modes, Parent modes, Coping modes, and the Healthy Adult. They furthermore highlight the idiosyncratic nature of schema modes within an individual case. Research and clinical implications of the findings are discussed, and links are made to the phenomenological perspective of Merleau-Ponty. <![CDATA[<b>Levinsonian seasons in the life of Steve Jobs: A psychobiographical case study</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1445-73772017000100005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Steve Jobs (1955-2011) was not only a businessman renowned for his legacy of technological innovation and entrepreneurship. His life history indicates eras or seasons as prankster, hippie, family man, and cancer fighter. This psychobiographical case study entailed a psychosocial-historical analysis of Jobs's development interpreted through Levinson's theory of the human life cycle, and was undertaken against the background of Merleau-Ponty's ontological philosophy that elucidates a human science phenomenology where the individual cannot be separated from his/her social world. The primary objective of this study was to uncover the eras and transitions within Jobs's life cycle. The secondary objective was to illustrate and test the relevance of Levinsonian theory as applied to Jobs's life. Jobs's life cycle was uncovered through an analysis of published and publically available materials, which included both primary and secondary data sources. Alexander's psychobiographical model was employed to extract salient evidence for analysis. A conceptual psychosocial-historical matrix guided the analysis. Key findings indicate that the central components of Jobs's life and social world (e.g., his occupation, family, friendships and terminal illness) had a significant influence on his psychosocial development. In conclusion, Jobs's development generally conformed to Levinsonian theory as well as to Merleau-Ponty's phenomenological ontology and illustrated the relevance of these conceptual models for understanding the individual's connectedness to his/her social world. <![CDATA[<b>Exploring the factors and effects of non-adherence to antiretroviral treatment by people living with HIV/AIDS</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1445-73772017000100006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The aim of the study was to determine how the health of people living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is affected by social and structural factors conducive to non-adherence to antiretroviral treatment. In a qualitative study conducted at Victoria Hospital in Alice, a town in the Eastern Cape, South Africa, 23 isiXhosa-speaking participants (including both men and women) between the ages of 18 and 60 years were interviewed. Guided by the social-ecological framework of Bronfenbrenner (1979), which is based on the notion that the health-seeking behaviour of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) is influenced by their social, institutional and physical environments, the analysis of the data identified the following themes conducive to non-adherence to antiretroviral treatment: food insecurity, financial constraints, poor service from health workers, unfair dismissal, fear of the consequences of disclosure, and rejection by church members. Based on these findings, and given that there is no single model of best practice that can appropriately address the various social and structural factors complicating the treatment of HIV/AIDS and hence the containing of the pandemic, the study suggests the need for not only supportive community initiatives, but a collaborative approach at both local and national level, and particularly in impoverished communities, by the appropriate departments of state to promote adherence to anti-retroviral treatment by making treatment and counselling facilities more accessible to PLWHA and educating communities about the implications and prevention of the disease. <![CDATA[<b>Phenomenology and Meaning Attribution</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1445-73772017000100007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The aim of the study was to determine how the health of people living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is affected by social and structural factors conducive to non-adherence to antiretroviral treatment. In a qualitative study conducted at Victoria Hospital in Alice, a town in the Eastern Cape, South Africa, 23 isiXhosa-speaking participants (including both men and women) between the ages of 18 and 60 years were interviewed. Guided by the social-ecological framework of Bronfenbrenner (1979), which is based on the notion that the health-seeking behaviour of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) is influenced by their social, institutional and physical environments, the analysis of the data identified the following themes conducive to non-adherence to antiretroviral treatment: food insecurity, financial constraints, poor service from health workers, unfair dismissal, fear of the consequences of disclosure, and rejection by church members. Based on these findings, and given that there is no single model of best practice that can appropriately address the various social and structural factors complicating the treatment of HIV/AIDS and hence the containing of the pandemic, the study suggests the need for not only supportive community initiatives, but a collaborative approach at both local and national level, and particularly in impoverished communities, by the appropriate departments of state to promote adherence to anti-retroviral treatment by making treatment and counselling facilities more accessible to PLWHA and educating communities about the implications and prevention of the disease. <![CDATA[<b>The end of phenomenology</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1445-73772017000100008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The aim of the study was to determine how the health of people living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is affected by social and structural factors conducive to non-adherence to antiretroviral treatment. In a qualitative study conducted at Victoria Hospital in Alice, a town in the Eastern Cape, South Africa, 23 isiXhosa-speaking participants (including both men and women) between the ages of 18 and 60 years were interviewed. Guided by the social-ecological framework of Bronfenbrenner (1979), which is based on the notion that the health-seeking behaviour of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) is influenced by their social, institutional and physical environments, the analysis of the data identified the following themes conducive to non-adherence to antiretroviral treatment: food insecurity, financial constraints, poor service from health workers, unfair dismissal, fear of the consequences of disclosure, and rejection by church members. Based on these findings, and given that there is no single model of best practice that can appropriately address the various social and structural factors complicating the treatment of HIV/AIDS and hence the containing of the pandemic, the study suggests the need for not only supportive community initiatives, but a collaborative approach at both local and national level, and particularly in impoverished communities, by the appropriate departments of state to promote adherence to anti-retroviral treatment by making treatment and counselling facilities more accessible to PLWHA and educating communities about the implications and prevention of the disease.