Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Acta Theologica]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=1015-875820130002&lang=es vol. 33 num. 2 lang. es <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Voorwoord</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200001&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es <![CDATA[<b>Hermie C. van Zyl: New Testament Scholar at the University of the Free State</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200002&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es In this article an overview of the academic contribution of Prof. Hermie C. van Zyl, Professor in New Testament Studies at the Faculty of Theology, University of the Free State, is presented. After a brief biographic overview, his academic contribution is discussed under the following headings: Synoptic Gospels, Hermeneutics, New Testament Studies as academic discipline; editorial activities; Bible translation and public theology. <![CDATA[<b><i>Logos,</i></b><b> Jesus and God in John 1:1-5: A textual analysis</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200003&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es In this article, the relationship between Christology and theology in John 1:1-5 is addressed. In particular, the relationship between the Logos and God has to be clarified. It is suggested that this relationship should be understood in the sense of communication between the Logos and God. This could then be interpreted further as that the Logos performed creation and the rest of God's plans. <![CDATA[<b>Entering the corridors of power: State and church in the reception history of Revelation</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200004&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article discusses how Revelation with its vehement critique of its powerful first-century opponents was appropriated in a time when these opponents became its members, supporters and partners. It analyses how Revelation with its bitter attack on political and religious groups in the first century and with its potential for instigating millenarian groups to revolt against the State, was reinterpreted in times when the church enjoyed a special relationship with the State and had entered the corridors of power. In this regard, it focuses as example on the rereading of Revelation by Oecumenius, the Greek commentator of the sixth century C.E. This will be illustrated in terms of two examples. First, the article will discuss how Oecumenius rereads Revelation to appease the Roman Empire of his time and to resist an apocalyptic fervour that could threaten the well-being of the State. Second, it will show how Oecumenius, using the language of the Byzantine Empire, rereads the position of the Jews in the original text in order to present the church as the stable, trustworthy partner of the Empire. <![CDATA[<b>Asenet's threefold transformation. Comparative moments in the apocryphal story: "Joseph and Aseneth" and the Pauline corpus</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200005&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Among theologians the apocryphal story of "Joseph and Aseneth" has in the majority of cases been interpreted as a narrative of transformation of Aseneth from a pagan to the Jewish religion of the God of Joseph. This one sided interpretation has dealt with the religious and cultural transformation but not with the gender transformation as such, namely the transformation of the woman from pagan reclusion, becoming a queen in her own right. Added to the religious and cultural transformation should be added the third transformation, the gender issue. This threefold transformation can be compared to the Pauline metaphor of "putting off" and "putting on" (of clothing) in Colosians 3:9-10. The primary concern in this passage is with a transformation of someone's total being and outlook from the old to the new in a holistic way. <![CDATA[<b>"Seeing the error of my ways". Revisiting Paul's paradigmatic, self-critical remarks in 1 Corinthians 15:8-10</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200006&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es In the ancient Mediterranean world any public admission of weakness reflected badly on one's personal status and honour, as well as the public reputation of one's group. However, in 1 Corinthians 15:8-10 Paul openly admits about being in error in the past regarding the true identity of Christ. Within the larger cultural framework of meaning, the apostle's graphic confession redefines his prior existence as a form of physical pollution. His open admittance of error also introduces a fresh understanding of God who freely extends grace to the morally impure. Paul serves as the paradigm of the active presence of God's grace, which ontologically transformed his religious status, as well as his understanding of Christ. In this new relationship, based solely on the grace of God, fitting responses by all grateful recipients entail public confessions of previous error and incessant hard work for the sake of Christ. <![CDATA[<b>Theology and rhetoric</b>: <b>Redefining the relationship between <i>res</i> and <i>verba</i></b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200007&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es After discussing three models defining the relationship between rhetoric (linguistic form, verba) and theology (content, res) in scholarship's history (part I), a theoretical discussion attempts to further undergird the third model according to which verba produce res (part II). As a first step, the inseparable intertwinement of res and verba is shown by empirical studies. The linguistic form always carries unspoken semantic content. Altering this form changes the content, even if a phrase's logical meaning remains the same. As a farther-reaching second step, constructivist philosophy of language is used, holding that language creates reality. "Reality" is defined as constructed by the brain and language and differentiated from ontic reality. Four sources of evidence are identified that make such reality constructs plausible to groups. Part III discusses the theological concept of "new creation" in light of the second part's findings. Part IV shows a way to overcome postmodern indifference with regard to "truth." <![CDATA[<b>The interpretation of the New Testament as the study of texts and contexts</b>: <b>Hermeneutics, identities, communities</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200008&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The focus here is on texts, Pauline and texts invoked by Paul, and ever-present imperial "super"-texts. The latter also establishes the context, as the social setting of Paul's letters with their rhetorical use of Othering was the Roman Empire with its identity politics. The rhetorical power of Paul and his scriptural texts contributed to discursive formations, since a strong sense of being and identity was negotiated through these texts, even when admitting that such formations are always in process, mutating and reformatting. Construing notions of Others was a particularly important feature in defining boundaries, for generating insiders and outsiders in Pauline texts. <![CDATA[<b>Continuity and discontinuity in God's rest (Heb 3:7-4:13)</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200009&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Our everyday experience is well acqainted with the reality of constancy and change. Persistence over time (continuity) is normally accompanied by an awareness of change (discontinuity). In the first part of the article this distinction is investigated and described from an epistemological perspective. The second part deals with the way in which the author of the letter to the Hebrews uses it in describing the rest that God promises his people. It is argued that the theme of God's rest entails an implicit awareness of the foundational relationship between constancy and change, which is used as hermeneutical strategy to encourage the readers on their pilgrimage. The article is concluded by refering to other themes that could be investigated on the basis of the same hermeneutical strategy. The study also leads to a few proposals for consideration by the translators of the new Afrikaans Bible. <![CDATA[<b>Abraham in Galatians and in Genesis</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200010&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The aim of this paper is to focus on the portrayal of Abraham in the letter to the Galatians and the book of Genesis respectively and to put it in perspective. What are the similarities and differences in the portrayal of Abraham in the Biblical books of Galatians and Genesis respectively? Three promises are made to Abraham in Genesis 12:1-3: land, progeny and blessing. It is interesting that, in each one of the passages investigated, emphasis is laid mainly (but not exclusively) on one of the promises. In Genesis 12-25, attention is paid to the promise of land and on Abraham as a blessing to the nations, but the emphasis is mainly on the problem of progeny. When Abraham resurfaces in the exilic time, the promise of the land seems to be the primary focus. In Galatians 3, the main emphasis is on blessing as the third part of the promises made to Abraham. <![CDATA[<b>Torah quotations common to Philo of Alexandria and the Acts of the Apostles</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200011&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es It is the intention of this contribution to investigate the text form of the LXX Torah quotations that overlap between the works of Philo of Alexandria and the Acts of the Apostles. It forms part of a larger project which investigates the common use of a possible Old Greek Version by both Philo and the New Testament. Six cases are investigated of which five are present in Stephen's Speech in Acts 7. There were no clear traces found of another Textvorlage of the Torah that was used by Luke and/or Philo in these cases. Luke's quotations here resemble adaptations and interpretations already made in the Christian tradition by his time. Several cases show evidence of conflations and paraphrases of the quoted passages. Noteworthy, however, is that Philo's text form and that of the reconstructed LXX text are very close in the cases investigated here. Where Philo notably differs from the reconstructed LXX text, Luke tends to represent a text form that is in closer alignment to that of the LXX than to that of Philo. <![CDATA[<b>"Gemeindetheologie" and fusion of horizons in Matthew's gospel: A survey</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200012&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The article assesses the author's contributions to Matthean studies over the past thirty years. It focuses on the hermeneutical principle of congeniality by means of distinguishing three horizons in Matthew's narrative world: firstly, that of Jesus and his disciples commissioned to inclusive care for the marginalised; secondly, that of the Matthean community which is associated with the narrative role of the disciples; and thirdly that of the present-day reader who engages with both narratives. The article discusses congeniality in terms of the concept "hermeneutical circle". The assessment of the author's contributions consists of a comparison and debate with current trends in Matthean studies. <![CDATA[<b>Ethical decisions according to 1 John</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200013&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es How to come to ethical decisions is an important question, both for individuals and religious institutions. In this article the way is discussed in which the author(s) of the Letters of John (especially 1 John) encourages the recipients of the Letters to come to the correct ethical decisions. He links all such decisions to the tradition they share, which corresponds to the truth they also share. The Spirit will lead and teach them accordingly. <![CDATA[<b>When kingdoms are kingdoms no more</b>: <b>A social-scientific reading of the Mustard Seed (Lk 13:18-19)</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200014&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article presents a social-scientific reading of the parable of the Mustard Seed. It is argued that the parable is not a parable of growth or contrast, and does not allude to the Old Testament. In taking the specifics of the Lukan version of the parable seriously, it is proposed that the Mustard Seed questions religious respectability as understood by the kingdom of the Temple, and undermines imperial interests of the kingdom of Rome. <![CDATA[<b>Ransomed by God into His household</b>: <b>Interpreting the ransom imagery in 1 Peter within the economic context of its author and addressees</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200015&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es 1 Peter 1:18 states: "You know that you were ransomed ..." (NRSV). This article offers an interpretation of the ransom image in 1 Peter within the economic context of the author and addressees, taking into consideration the relevant structure of economics (the geography and demography of the areas identified in the address of 1 Peter) and relevant performance of economics (production, distribution and consumption) in the area where the addressees of 1 Peter lived. After the problem statement and methodological clarification (1), the economic-historic context of the addressees is constructed (2), and the epistolographic characteristics of 1 Peter is defined (3). Then the ransom-imagery in 1 Peter is analysed and the referents of this ransom-imagery determined (4). Finally the ransom metaphor in 1 Peter is interpreted within the economic-historic context of its addressees (5). <![CDATA[<b>Discerning the spirits in Mark</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200016&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es In reading the gospel of Mark one gets the impression that one of the main activities of Jesus is exorcizing demons and unclean spirits. Exorcizing is part of the battle between powers inimical to God and the spirit of God that descended on Jesus when he was baptized by John. Unclean spirits deprive human beings of their identity, they dehumanize them and in the end they destroy them. Their uncleanness is the opposite of the holiness of God. It is possible to read the gospel of Mark as the struggle of Jesus with demons. His death and resurrection is the victory over their uncleanness. When it is said that a special kind of demons can be cast out only through prayer, this indicates the spirit of God who lives in the believers and who prays to God. It is by surrender to the will of God that unclean spirits are overcome. <![CDATA[<b><i>The Equality of Believers. Protestant Missionaries and the Racial Politics of South Africa</i></b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200017&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es In reading the gospel of Mark one gets the impression that one of the main activities of Jesus is exorcizing demons and unclean spirits. Exorcizing is part of the battle between powers inimical to God and the spirit of God that descended on Jesus when he was baptized by John. Unclean spirits deprive human beings of their identity, they dehumanize them and in the end they destroy them. Their uncleanness is the opposite of the holiness of God. It is possible to read the gospel of Mark as the struggle of Jesus with demons. His death and resurrection is the victory over their uncleanness. When it is said that a special kind of demons can be cast out only through prayer, this indicates the spirit of God who lives in the believers and who prays to God. It is by surrender to the will of God that unclean spirits are overcome. <![CDATA[<b><i>Wat doen ons wanneer ons bid?</i></b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200018&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es In reading the gospel of Mark one gets the impression that one of the main activities of Jesus is exorcizing demons and unclean spirits. Exorcizing is part of the battle between powers inimical to God and the spirit of God that descended on Jesus when he was baptized by John. Unclean spirits deprive human beings of their identity, they dehumanize them and in the end they destroy them. Their uncleanness is the opposite of the holiness of God. It is possible to read the gospel of Mark as the struggle of Jesus with demons. His death and resurrection is the victory over their uncleanness. When it is said that a special kind of demons can be cast out only through prayer, this indicates the spirit of God who lives in the believers and who prays to God. It is by surrender to the will of God that unclean spirits are overcome. <![CDATA[<b><i>Treasure in the Field: Salvation in the Bible and in Our Lives</i></b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200019&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es In reading the gospel of Mark one gets the impression that one of the main activities of Jesus is exorcizing demons and unclean spirits. Exorcizing is part of the battle between powers inimical to God and the spirit of God that descended on Jesus when he was baptized by John. Unclean spirits deprive human beings of their identity, they dehumanize them and in the end they destroy them. Their uncleanness is the opposite of the holiness of God. It is possible to read the gospel of Mark as the struggle of Jesus with demons. His death and resurrection is the victory over their uncleanness. When it is said that a special kind of demons can be cast out only through prayer, this indicates the spirit of God who lives in the believers and who prays to God. It is by surrender to the will of God that unclean spirits are overcome. <![CDATA[<b><i>The Lion has roared</i></b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582013000200020&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es In reading the gospel of Mark one gets the impression that one of the main activities of Jesus is exorcizing demons and unclean spirits. Exorcizing is part of the battle between powers inimical to God and the spirit of God that descended on Jesus when he was baptized by John. Unclean spirits deprive human beings of their identity, they dehumanize them and in the end they destroy them. Their uncleanness is the opposite of the holiness of God. It is possible to read the gospel of Mark as the struggle of Jesus with demons. His death and resurrection is the victory over their uncleanness. When it is said that a special kind of demons can be cast out only through prayer, this indicates the spirit of God who lives in the believers and who prays to God. It is by surrender to the will of God that unclean spirits are overcome.