Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Acta Theologica]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=1015-875820080003&lang=en vol. 28 num. lang. en <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>“Prompte et sincere” — “Willing and sincere” </b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582008000300001&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en <![CDATA[<b>Paupertas (poverty) in John Calvin's Institutes</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582008000300002&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en <![CDATA[<b>Calvin and demonology</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582008000300003&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Scripture teaches an increased occurrence of demonology at the end of time (cf. 1 Tim. 4:1; Rev. 16:13, 14).This truth can already be observed in increasing occultism, witchcraft and other forms of demonology in Europe and in Africa, where traditional African culture plays a decisive role. In order to combat demonology from a Reformed point of view, it is important to note John Calvin's opinion and approach. Not only was he one of the greatest Reformed theologians, but he also lived and worked in the "devil's golden age". Calvin's hermeneutical principles and his interpretation of Scripture are still essentially important. <![CDATA[<b>Origin and originality of  John Calvin's 'Harmony of the Law', the expository project on Exodus-Deuteronomy (1559-1563)</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582008000300004&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en John Calvin's plan to study Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy in the form of a Harmony on the Last Four Books of Moses was conceived in the weekly Bible studies of the joint ministers of Geneva. A surviving manuscript of Cavin's introductory exposition to the series, studied here for the first time since the 16th century, reveals intriguing details on the conception and execution of this plan. It also sheds light on the history of the congrĂ©gations, this fascinating example of concentration on the Bible in Geneva, on the co-operation of the ministers, and on Calvin's role as the moderator of the Company of Pastors. The origin of the Harmony idea is an adaptation of the Gospel Harmonies. Calvin's approach is highly original in the history of exegesis. The text of the congrĂ©gation points to Cavin's reading of the commentary of the Lutheran Martin Borrhaus and, possibly, of Johannes Brenz' commentary on Exodus. <![CDATA[<b>An investigation into Calvin's use of Augustine</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582008000300005&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article briefly investigates the use of Augustine as an authority from the early church in John Calvin's writings. Calvin frequently referred to and quoted Augustine in his writings. Augustine undoubtedly exerted an influence on Calvin's views and arguments. This article traces Calvin's use of Augustine in his writings chronologically as they were published since 1532. In addition, a data analysis provides relevant information in order to argue a scrutinised exposition of Augustine's influence on Calvin's thinking. The article does not try to compare the theologies of Augustine and Calvin, nor to establish a theory that would reveal Augustine's influence on Calvin's theology. This investigation suggests methodological help for further research in this regard. <![CDATA[<b><i>Le Sainct Esprit a yci pourtrait au vif</i></b><b> ... Calvin's understanding of the Holy Spirit's modus operandi in the life of believers in the light of the preface to his <i>Commentary on the Psalms</i></b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582008000300006&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The autobiographical details in Calvin's Preface to his Commentary on the Psalms illustrate the modus operandi of the Holy Spirit working out an identification between the authors of the Psalms and the reader. In the Preface, the Psalms are divinely inspired, life-giving words that enhance the experience of the readers similar to the experience lived and expressed by the authors. The testimonium internum Spiritu Sancti is the core of the Preface inasmuch as expressed by means of a necessary process of anatomy and dissection of all the affections of the soul. Since the book of Psalms adequately deals with all that concerns the knowledge of eternal salvation, the modus operandi of the Holy Spirit through the Psalms is the gospel itself. <![CDATA[<b>Exercitium pietatis - Calvin's interpretation of the Lord's Prayer</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582008000300007&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The autobiographical details in Calvin's Preface to his Commentary on the Psalms illustrate the modus operandi of the Holy Spirit working out an identification between the authors of the Psalms and the reader. In the Preface, the Psalms are divinely inspired, life-giving words that enhance the experience of the readers similar to the experience lived and expressed by the authors. The testimonium internum Spiritu Sancti is the core of the Preface inasmuch as expressed by means of a necessary process of anatomy and dissection of all the affections of the soul. Since the book of Psalms adequately deals with all that concerns the knowledge of eternal salvation, the modus operandi of the Holy Spirit through the Psalms is the gospel itself. <![CDATA[<b>Other ways to God?</b> <b>Calvin on non-Christian religions</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582008000300008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Religious freedom is currently guaranteed by constitution in many countries. At the same time it has become a popular notion that no religion should claim to be the only true way to knowledge of God. \n the sixteenth century Christianity was far less tolerant of aberrations and false religion. This study explores John Calvin's views on the religion of Gentiles (paganism), Turks (Islam), and Jews (Judaism). Calvin refers to these religions not only in the consecutive editions of his Institutes, but also in a number of other writings. He asserts the uniqueness of Christ as the only Mediator and Redeemer for mankind on his unconditional acceptance of Holy Scriptures as the Word of God. As God created man in his own image with a distinct sensus divinitatis, the offer of true knowledge of God remains open to anyone. <![CDATA[<b>Respect for the liturgical text: J. Calvin and J. S. Bach</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582008000300009&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Despite obvious differences in terms of historical and theological aspects between Calvin and Bach, both share a respect for the priority of the Biblical text in worship. The anomaly between Calvin's engagement in the versification of the Psalter and Bach's preference for the literal (rather than a versified) use of the Biblical text (for example in his St. Matthew Passion) is rooted in their common respect for the Word of God originating from the Reformation.