Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Acta Theologica]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=1015-875820160001&lang=pt vol. 36 num. 1 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Interview with Piet J. Naudé</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582016000100001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Critical race theory and the question of safety in dialogues on race</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582016000100002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This study seeks to combine research from critical race theory, as applied to post-1994 South Africa, with insights from practical theology. It looks into points of agreement between these perspectives, especially the call to critically appraise ideologies that deny or obscure the present-day consequences of racism. On this foundation, the article moves on to consider the recommendations adduced by Leonardo and Porter (2010:147) and Sue (2013:666-669) as to how dialogues around race and racism can be enhanced. The article begins by contextualising its argument, followed by an overview of the guiding principles of CRT, focusing on the way these have been applied to research in South Africa. Thereafter, the precepts of CRT are matched with insights from scholars in theology regarding the continued need to glean more precisely nuanced understandings of how race plays out in South African society. Finally, the article draws from Leonardo and Porter (2010:140-142) and Sue's (2013:666-669) suggestions. <![CDATA[<b>"One in Christ": Fedsem spiritualities of solidarity</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582016000100003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article focuses on spirituality as the basis of life at the Federal Theological Seminary of Southern Africa (Fedsem) (1963-1993) during the apartheid years, when Fedsem, groups and individuals within it were subjected to regular surveillance and scrutiny. The spiritual life of the seminary, manifested most clearly in its worship life, became its source of strength and sustained its mission and vision: to be and yet, to become "One in Christ". This was conveyed by means of various forms of denominational and ecumenical solidarity as an expression of Christian love. Many attempts were made to try to understand and formulate policies relating to the practice of spirituality in an ecumenical context. These met with varying degrees of success. <![CDATA[<b>The wilderness wanderings: A theo-liminal pedagogy for mind decolonisation in African Christianity</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582016000100004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article argues that the current economic and political underdevelopment in the majority of African countries is a symptom of a profound metaphysical and intellectual crisis in the African person's imagination and consciousness, a consequence of conceptual alienation wrought about mind colonialism. The process of decolonisation did not end with geopolitical liberation, but continues as liberation of the African mind and subjectivity. Reading this reality in light of the Exodus wilderness wanderings as theo-decolonial paradigm, the article suggests a theo-liminal pedagogy for engaging in the process of mind decolonisation. <![CDATA[<b>Human genetic engineering and social justice in South Africa: Moltmann and human dignity</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582016000100005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The realities of social injustice in the present South African context, with its great and growing gap between rich and poor and unequal distribution of wealth and resources, are also acutely visible in the health-care sector. Genetic engineering would lead to some children having the cards stacked overwhelmingly in their favour, raising the concern for the justice or fairness of this type of biotechnology. In this contribution, I argue that the notion of justice as fairness, put forward by Rawls, and the focus on human dignity in Moltmann's theology can help address the bioethical challenges of genetic engineering in the context of inequality, specifically in South Africa. <![CDATA[<b>"Anatheism" within the framework of theodicy: From theistic thinking to theopaschitic thinking in a pastoral hermeneutics</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582016000100006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The Syrian and refugee crises, the violent radicalisation in Europe, and global xenophobia stir up anew the link between the human quest for meaning and hope within the realm of human misery and destructive acts of severe evil. The article focuses on the problem of theodicy and its link to God images. It discusses both inclusive and exclusive approaches to the theodicy issue, and proposes a paradigm shift from threat power to intimate, vulnerable power. A diagram is designed in order to identify different metaphors for God in pastoral caregiving. With reference to a pastoral approach, lamentation is viewed as an appropriate variant for theodicy. In the attempt to return to 'God after God' (anatheism), lamentation could help reinterpret the hesed of God in terms of our human predicament of 'undeserved suffering'. <![CDATA[<b>The goal of maturity in Ephesians 4:13-16</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582016000100007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt In this article, I argue that, in Ephesians 4:1-16, the author underscores spiritual maturity as the bridge between the new identity of the Christian (Eph. 1-3) and the moral code of the Christian life commensurate with the new identity (Eph. 4:17-6:20).1 I interpret Ephesians 4:13 to obtain the meaning of maturity. I critique the most notable interpretations and views in relation to Ephesians 4:13, after which, by way of structural analysis of Ephesians 4:13, I delineate the meaning of maturity and determine that, from its essence, maturity is essential for the Christian. This article provides the modern church an alternative way to view the theme and structure of Ephesians and an interpretation of Ephesians 4:13-16. New Testament scholars as well as church leaders, decision-makers in church work, generally, and Christian education planners will find this article quite engaging. <![CDATA[<b>The "First Deborah" - Genesis 35:8 in the literary and theological context</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582016000100008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Exegetes consider Genesis 35:8 an intrusive verse in the narrative of Genesis 35:1-15 because of its isolated mention of the death and burial of Deborah, Rebekah's nurse. However, the analysis of the verse in its literary and theological context in this article shows that it has been strategically placed in the narrative to underscore, among other things, the important role of Deborah in the Bethel tradition and the Jacob Cycle, as well as the subtle pointer to the fact that little people also have a place in the overall narrative of God's people. <![CDATA[<b><i>Honest to God </i>and the South African churches in 2016</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582016000100009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The year 2013 was fifty years since the publication of Honest to God, by John A.T. Robinson (1919-1983), who was Bishop of Woolwich at the time. The book became a bestseller. The research question that gave rise to the present article is how relevant and sound its main ideas are for South Africa, in particular, and for his own church in 2016. This paper examines Robinson's views from three perspectives, namely Christian and secular practical ethics, the recent history of the church, to which the Bishop belonged in England, and the contemporary South African situation, in particular. The paper argues that, five hundred years on, Robinson's project of developing a Christian response to contemporary secular challenges remains valid in South Africa. <![CDATA[<b>The spiritual mentality profile of female pietists on the South African frontier, 1750-1860</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582016000100010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The reading of female religious literature on the South African frontier allows us to reconstruct important elements of a shared religious mentality profile of these pioneer female believers. Such a reconstruction of the religious mentality profile of pietistic women on the frontier reveals a number of important aspects for understanding their spiritual life: self-awakenings and conversions; self-purification; self-illumination and mystically tainted experiences; recollection and the experience of quiet; meditation, contemplation, ecstasy and rapture; spiritual desertion, and abandonment of the soul and the unitive life with God in Christ. <![CDATA[<b>The inner Reformation of the sciences: An ambiguity in the Radically Orthodox thought of John Milbank?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582016000100011&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Although both Radical Orthodoxy and Reformational Philosophy question the autonomy of theoretical reason, the views of prominent representatives of Radical Orthodoxy do not enable an inner reformation of the non-theological academic disciplines. Whereas Radical Orthodoxy holds that philosophy is concerned with being as such, theology investigates the ground of being, and being in respectu Dei. Reformational Philosophy questions theology as "queen of the sciences" and holds that every creature has to be "related" to God. Milbank contemplates the idea of a Christian sociology, by considering the church as a distinct society (altera civitas), but considers it to be silly to talk of a Christian mathematics. An alternative idea of Christian scholarship is advanced in opposition to Milbank's classical Thomistic view, namely that theology has to preserve and fulfil philosophy, echoing the Scholastic adage that grace does not eliminate nature, but perfects it (gratia naturam non tollit, sed perficit). <![CDATA[<b>Die naam "Nederduitse Gereformeerde Kerk"</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582016000100012&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt An investigation into the name of the Dutch Reformed Church (DRC) reveals that it is a reformed church in the Dutch tradition with the cultural side of it's origin in the Netherlands. The acceptance of this name indicates that the DRC should never stop an internal, ongoing process of reformation. The fact that the DRC officially took the name is owned to it's General Synod to which decisions over this kind of thing, is given. The name "Dutch Reformed" was thus accepted in 1962. Both the terms "reformed" and "Dutch" in connection with the DRC, has a history to which the present DRC still adds meaning. <![CDATA[<b>The Lukan <i>periplus </i>of Paul's Third Journey with a textual conundrum in Acts 20:15</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582016000100013&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article discusses a pericope in Acts 20:6-21:8 recounting the sea portion of Paul's third journey. Its genre resembles the periplus, and generic features are discussed as well as parallels with other periploi. Paul's periplus in the Aegean and Mediterranean Seas is presented within a fixed calendar in the Jewish year, and the itinerary's specifics are detailed. A textual conundrum in Acts 20:15 is discussed as it relates to an anchorage opposite Chios. A lexical discussion of αντικρυς Χίου is presented, and possible translations are reviewed. The article presents a new hypothesis that the Ionian city of Erythrae was the place of the ship's landing. It closes with a brief history of Erythrae's significance in the Greco-Roman world and why a stop there by Paul's coasting vessel was likely during this part of the journey. <![CDATA[<b>The mission of preaching: Equipping the community for faithful witness</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582016000100014&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article discusses a pericope in Acts 20:6-21:8 recounting the sea portion of Paul's third journey. Its genre resembles the periplus, and generic features are discussed as well as parallels with other periploi. Paul's periplus in the Aegean and Mediterranean Seas is presented within a fixed calendar in the Jewish year, and the itinerary's specifics are detailed. A textual conundrum in Acts 20:15 is discussed as it relates to an anchorage opposite Chios. A lexical discussion of αντικρυς Χίου is presented, and possible translations are reviewed. The article presents a new hypothesis that the Ionian city of Erythrae was the place of the ship's landing. It closes with a brief history of Erythrae's significance in the Greco-Roman world and why a stop there by Paul's coasting vessel was likely during this part of the journey. <![CDATA[<b>Heel israel zal behouden worden: Een kritisch onderzoek van de gangbare exegese Van Romeinen 11</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582016000100015&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article discusses a pericope in Acts 20:6-21:8 recounting the sea portion of Paul's third journey. Its genre resembles the periplus, and generic features are discussed as well as parallels with other periploi. Paul's periplus in the Aegean and Mediterranean Seas is presented within a fixed calendar in the Jewish year, and the itinerary's specifics are detailed. A textual conundrum in Acts 20:15 is discussed as it relates to an anchorage opposite Chios. A lexical discussion of αντικρυς Χίου is presented, and possible translations are reviewed. The article presents a new hypothesis that the Ionian city of Erythrae was the place of the ship's landing. It closes with a brief history of Erythrae's significance in the Greco-Roman world and why a stop there by Paul's coasting vessel was likely during this part of the journey. <![CDATA[<b>Pathways in theology: Ecumenical, African and reformed</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582016000100016&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article discusses a pericope in Acts 20:6-21:8 recounting the sea portion of Paul's third journey. Its genre resembles the periplus, and generic features are discussed as well as parallels with other periploi. Paul's periplus in the Aegean and Mediterranean Seas is presented within a fixed calendar in the Jewish year, and the itinerary's specifics are detailed. A textual conundrum in Acts 20:15 is discussed as it relates to an anchorage opposite Chios. A lexical discussion of αντικρυς Χίου is presented, and possible translations are reviewed. The article presents a new hypothesis that the Ionian city of Erythrae was the place of the ship's landing. It closes with a brief history of Erythrae's significance in the Greco-Roman world and why a stop there by Paul's coasting vessel was likely during this part of the journey. <![CDATA[<b>Liefde voor Israël nader bekeken: Voor het evangelie zijn alle volken gelijk</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-87582016000100017&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article discusses a pericope in Acts 20:6-21:8 recounting the sea portion of Paul's third journey. Its genre resembles the periplus, and generic features are discussed as well as parallels with other periploi. Paul's periplus in the Aegean and Mediterranean Seas is presented within a fixed calendar in the Jewish year, and the itinerary's specifics are detailed. A textual conundrum in Acts 20:15 is discussed as it relates to an anchorage opposite Chios. A lexical discussion of αντικρυς Χίου is presented, and possible translations are reviewed. The article presents a new hypothesis that the Ionian city of Erythrae was the place of the ship's landing. It closes with a brief history of Erythrae's significance in the Greco-Roman world and why a stop there by Paul's coasting vessel was likely during this part of the journey.