Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Psychology in Society]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=1015-604620090003&lang=en vol. num. 38 lang. en <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Discourse and psychoanalysis</b>: <b>translating concepts into "fragmenting" methodology</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462009000300001&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en There is a growing body of work that draws on psychoanalytic interpretive strategies to enrich our understanding of the psychological processes involved in an individual's investment in particular discursive positions. This work champions the irreducibility of the social and the psychological, exploring the way in which the desires and wishes of the individual mediate the accessibility of social discourses. However, employing psychoanalysis as a framework for interpreting text necessarily means proceeding tentatively: rather than an individualising, theory-driven tool, the authors argue for its use in a way that "fragments" texts. Specifically, we demonstrate how psychoanalytic interpretation might be grounded in a fine-grained narrative analysis as well as in a reflexive interpretation of the research relationship, in order to seek ways to open out the text to produce various new discursive forms, rather than to "fix" their meaning. <![CDATA[<b>Planes of endurance</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462009000300002&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en In this article the notion of planes of endurance (or layered sedimentations) is developed. This is in response to attempts at mastery identified in modernist and postmodernist projects where the influence of temporality is erased either by attempting to establish unassailable universals or by introducing a radical plasticity. Focussing specifically on these themes in embodiment work, the writing of William Connolly, specifically his notions of layers and sedimentation, is utilised to provide a more nuanced reading of temporality as that which is both endurance and flux. These notions provide a matrix which allows a more complex understanding of the distinction drawn between the body and the environment and the biological and the socio-cultural <![CDATA[<b>Agency through bodily alterity</b>: <b>the case of "proanorexia" websites</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462009000300003&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The phenomenon of pro-anorexia websites is beginning to receive attention within the academy following its increasing visibility in popular media. Pro-Ana is vibrant, yet subversive online community, with membership purportedly comprised of girls in their mid to late teens. This article draws on an Honours research project that explored discursive representation on two such websites. It draws on post-structuralist feminist theoretical resources, and discourse analysis to explore the constructions of identity and bodily inscriptions within the Pro-Ana community. We include a brief statement on historical constructions of anorexia, as well as more contemporary medical and lay representations. Our main analysis focuses on a generic logo of the websites, which reads "anorexia is a lifestyle not a disease". We argue that members of the Pro-Ana community (Anas) display agency by both resisting and conforming to dominant discursive representations of anorexia, problematizing dominant constructions of the gendered body. We posit that this performativity is a critical reply to the medical and public responses to the anorexic body and the phenomenon of Pro-Ana. <![CDATA[<b>Contextualising the experiences of South African women in the immediate aftermath of rape</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462009000300004&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The psychological impact of rape is most commonly described by drawing on a medical/ psychiatric framework, which feminists have argued fails to factor in the broader contexts of patriarchy and female oppression. Internationally, and in South Africa, feminist researchers have called for more research on rape trauma which seeks to understand the impact of rape in light of the marginalised and oppressive contexts within which particular groups of women live. In response to this need, this article presents a feminist discourse analysis of conversations with nine women living in a low-income area of Cape Town interviewed within 72 hours of being raped. The analysis revealed that the women's narratives of rape were informed by patriarchal discourses which operated to reinforce gendered relations of power. The discourses discussed in the paper are identified as discourses of damage, ostracism, resistance and survival, confessional discourses and discourses of masculinity and femininity. A multitude of cultural scripts informed the discourses drawn upon by the participants, highlighting the heterogeneous, fluid and dynamic nature of the participants' subjectivities and indicating that their relation to such discourses are far from being fixed, stable and unambiguous. Furthermore, the dominant discourses highlighted in the findings are understood to play a binding role in maintaining social structures of power. <![CDATA[<b>See no evil, hear no evil</b>: <b>the rise and fall of child sexual abuse in the 20<sup>th</sup> century</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462009000300005&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This paper examines the development of a medical perspective on child sexual abuse during the course of the 20th century and argues that such a perspective has not served the best interests of sexually abused children. An alternate social perspective is outlined, which would appear to have the potential to adequately address the needs of sexually abused children in the 21st century. The paper concludes by arguing that, despite its merits, the social perspective is likely to be of little value unless we can learn to more effectively see and hear the voices of child survivors. <![CDATA[<b>Towards cohesion in disability research</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462009000300006&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This paper examines the development of a medical perspective on child sexual abuse during the course of the 20th century and argues that such a perspective has not served the best interests of sexually abused children. An alternate social perspective is outlined, which would appear to have the potential to adequately address the needs of sexually abused children in the 21st century. The paper concludes by arguing that, despite its merits, the social perspective is likely to be of little value unless we can learn to more effectively see and hear the voices of child survivors. <![CDATA[<b>From spectator to "spectactor"</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462009000300007&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This paper examines the development of a medical perspective on child sexual abuse during the course of the 20th century and argues that such a perspective has not served the best interests of sexually abused children. An alternate social perspective is outlined, which would appear to have the potential to adequately address the needs of sexually abused children in the 21st century. The paper concludes by arguing that, despite its merits, the social perspective is likely to be of little value unless we can learn to more effectively see and hear the voices of child survivors.