Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Psychology in Society]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=1015-604620080001&lang=en vol. num. 36 lang. en <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Reflections on men, masculinities and meaning in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462008000100001&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en <![CDATA[<b>Using photo-narratives to explore the construction of young masculinities</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462008000100002&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article illustrates the use of photo-narratives to explore a group of adolescent boys' constructions of young masculinities. The boys were from Alexandra Township, an historically working-class and black community in Gauteng. The participants in this study were provided with disposable cameras to take 27 photographs using My life as a boy as the theme. Arrangements were made for the photographs to be collected and processed. In the follow-up interviews, the boys were asked to give a description of each photograph and why and how they had decided to take that photograph to represent aspects of their masculinity. Some of the photographs taken depicted cars, girls, shoes, smoking, drinking, reading books, cleaning and cooking. The photo-narrative method proved useful in allowing boys to represent multifaceted aspects of themselves and their lives and also seemed to highlight both individualised and subjective aspects as well as dominant or normative aspects of masculinity. In talking about their photographs, it is clear that the construction of young township masculinities is characterised by feelings of ambivalence, hesitation and contradiction. The boys in this study seemed to simultaneously comply with and oppose hegemonic norms of masculinity in the narrative images. The boys' photo-narratives reveal that negotiating alternative voices of young township masculinities is fraught with emotional costs and sacrifices. <![CDATA[<b>Masculinity, sexuality and the body of male soldiers</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462008000100003&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Considering that social identities such as gender, culture, race, age and class play a major role in constructing masculinity, this paper looks at how these intersect with the body and what discourses of masculinity and sexualities are in evidence in this respect in the overtly masculinist context of the military. Drawing on data from a larger study exploring 14 military men's narratives on their masculinity, sexuality, sexual relationships and HIV/AIDS, the findings illustrate how successful masculinity in the military context is played out through particular bodily performances, including being physically strong, proving one's strength through high risk military activities, and through hypersexuality. There is evidence that the body and other bodily representations and accessories related to being in the military (uniform, weapons, etc.) is a key area in which masculine identity is performed by men in this institution. The suggestion is that male sexual practices cannot be tackled without examining the intersection of the body and masculine identity and in the military this means a particular focus on the way in which the body is centred in performances and representations of being both a military person and a man. <![CDATA[<b>Living with HIV as a man</b>: <b>Implications for masculinity</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462008000100004&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article examines constructions of masculinity by men living with HIV and using antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) in a South African rural village. It explores the impact of HIV on men's lives, and discusses the implications of these impacts for understandings of masculinity. A total of 25 men were interviewed to explore their experience of living with HIV and the challenges posed by HIV sickness to their lives as men. Results show that the men's lives changed dramatically following sickness from HIV and that these changes were perceived to negatively impact on various important markers of masculinity. In particular, the men's provider roles and sexualities were perceived as significantly affected by HIV sickness. Drawing on current debates and theorising in the field of masculinity studies, the article interrogates the perceived threats to these markers and the participants' responses to them. <![CDATA[<b>Masculinities in student politics</b>: <b>Gendered discourses of struggle and liberation at the University of Limpopo</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462008000100005&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The article examines the role of discourses of struggle and liberation in the performance of gender in student politics at the University of Limpopo. Moving from an understanding of how discourses of masculinity intertwine with the discourses of student activism and the struggle against apartheid, the article analyses the elections held for the Students' Representatives Council (SRC) at Turfloop Campus in October 2006. It is argued that male student politicians draw on struggle history and revocations of African traditionalism in ways that keep them at the centre of student politics, while female students are kept on the margins as a muted group. The article aims to show how male and female students position themselves as gendered beings in the realm of student politics; and how, in the process, discourses of gender and the struggle translate into social practice. The analysis shows that it is not fruitful to view discourses of gender in isolation from other discourses. Rather, the reading of the student elections points to the need for a careful examination of how discourses of gender are entangled in broader discourses of hegemony at the political level; and not least how organisations and individual actors engage with these discourses. <![CDATA[<b>Masculinities</b>: <b>complexities and variations</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462008000100006&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The article examines the role of discourses of struggle and liberation in the performance of gender in student politics at the University of Limpopo. Moving from an understanding of how discourses of masculinity intertwine with the discourses of student activism and the struggle against apartheid, the article analyses the elections held for the Students' Representatives Council (SRC) at Turfloop Campus in October 2006. It is argued that male student politicians draw on struggle history and revocations of African traditionalism in ways that keep them at the centre of student politics, while female students are kept on the margins as a muted group. The article aims to show how male and female students position themselves as gendered beings in the realm of student politics; and how, in the process, discourses of gender and the struggle translate into social practice. The analysis shows that it is not fruitful to view discourses of gender in isolation from other discourses. Rather, the reading of the student elections points to the need for a careful examination of how discourses of gender are entangled in broader discourses of hegemony at the political level; and not least how organisations and individual actors engage with these discourses. <![CDATA[<b>Gendered challenges to psychology's authority</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462008000100007&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The article examines the role of discourses of struggle and liberation in the performance of gender in student politics at the University of Limpopo. Moving from an understanding of how discourses of masculinity intertwine with the discourses of student activism and the struggle against apartheid, the article analyses the elections held for the Students' Representatives Council (SRC) at Turfloop Campus in October 2006. It is argued that male student politicians draw on struggle history and revocations of African traditionalism in ways that keep them at the centre of student politics, while female students are kept on the margins as a muted group. The article aims to show how male and female students position themselves as gendered beings in the realm of student politics; and how, in the process, discourses of gender and the struggle translate into social practice. The analysis shows that it is not fruitful to view discourses of gender in isolation from other discourses. Rather, the reading of the student elections points to the need for a careful examination of how discourses of gender are entangled in broader discourses of hegemony at the political level; and not least how organisations and individual actors engage with these discourses. <![CDATA[<b>At the grassroots</b>: <b>AIDS and people in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462008000100008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The article examines the role of discourses of struggle and liberation in the performance of gender in student politics at the University of Limpopo. Moving from an understanding of how discourses of masculinity intertwine with the discourses of student activism and the struggle against apartheid, the article analyses the elections held for the Students' Representatives Council (SRC) at Turfloop Campus in October 2006. It is argued that male student politicians draw on struggle history and revocations of African traditionalism in ways that keep them at the centre of student politics, while female students are kept on the margins as a muted group. The article aims to show how male and female students position themselves as gendered beings in the realm of student politics; and how, in the process, discourses of gender and the struggle translate into social practice. The analysis shows that it is not fruitful to view discourses of gender in isolation from other discourses. Rather, the reading of the student elections points to the need for a careful examination of how discourses of gender are entangled in broader discourses of hegemony at the political level; and not least how organisations and individual actors engage with these discourses. <![CDATA[<b>Inkatha warrior masculinities</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462008000100009&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The article examines the role of discourses of struggle and liberation in the performance of gender in student politics at the University of Limpopo. Moving from an understanding of how discourses of masculinity intertwine with the discourses of student activism and the struggle against apartheid, the article analyses the elections held for the Students' Representatives Council (SRC) at Turfloop Campus in October 2006. It is argued that male student politicians draw on struggle history and revocations of African traditionalism in ways that keep them at the centre of student politics, while female students are kept on the margins as a muted group. The article aims to show how male and female students position themselves as gendered beings in the realm of student politics; and how, in the process, discourses of gender and the struggle translate into social practice. The analysis shows that it is not fruitful to view discourses of gender in isolation from other discourses. Rather, the reading of the student elections points to the need for a careful examination of how discourses of gender are entangled in broader discourses of hegemony at the political level; and not least how organisations and individual actors engage with these discourses.