Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Psychology in Society]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=1015-604620170001&lang=pt vol. num. 53 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Writing outside history: Reification, agency and the discourse on identity and difference</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462017000100001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The recent debates about the transformation, or decolonization, of higher education in South Africa have underscored the continuing salience of "identity" in post-apartheid political discourse. Disillusioned with the token equality of liberal politics, student-led movements now demand that their manifestos be granted legitimacy precisely on particularistic grounds. With the aim of understanding what conception of social change these demands entail, this archival study analyzes how political identity and agency have been constructed in contemporary South African academic discourse. More specifically, this study identifies the different kinds of ontological and epistemological presuppositions that particular uses of language are necessarily committed to, and therefore necessarily limited by (both politically and conceptually). Utilizing Scopus, a bibliographic database, the five most relevant and highly cited articles were selected and subsequently analyzed using the logical rules governing both predicate ascription and presupposition. Two main uses of language were isolated based on common sets of presuppositions: 1) A non-human ontology of agents, and 2) Agency as a property of antecedently given identities. Each use of language was found to comprise two further subcategories respectively: 1.1) Psychological agencies, 1.2) External agencies; and 2.1) Realist view of political identity, 2.2) Constructivist view of political identity. The results of the data analysis suggest that the two main uses of language are mutually reinforcing. Taken together, they appear to entail an account of social change that, via the linguistic obfuscation and reification of human agency, is in fact immanent to the existing socio-political order itself. It is suggested that future research on political identity and agency will require a trans-disciplinary approach concerned with explaining manifest social antagonisms (e.g. class oppression; institutional racism; Islamophobia) in terms of the global historical and material conditions within which they are located. <![CDATA[<b>Protests, "acting-out", group psychology, surplus enjoyment and neoliberal capitalism</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462017000100002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt How should one make sense of the recent student protests across South Africa, which seem to be motivated by grievances relating to various forms of financial exclusion, from registrationandtuitionfeesto costs ofaccommodation, and later pre-election protests, triggered by competition among would-be party candidates? It appears that Freud and Lacan's countervailing psychoanalytical concepts of "acting-out" and "transference" cast explanatory light on this variegated phenomenon - the former insofar as it is an index of repressed, unarticulated motives manifesting themselves in irrational behaviour resistant to "analysis", instead of ethically accountable "acts", and the latter, on the contrary, designating a process according to which subjects are receptive to, and act (or speak) according to the requirements of "successful analysis", including the "subject supposed to know". Cognisance must also be taken of the fact that the protestors constitute(d) groups, and that it should therefore be approached as such in psychoanalytical terms. Recourse to the Freudian notion of "group psychology" is heuristically helpful in this regard. This is augmented by focusing on what has, it is argued, functioned to trigger the protest behaviour, namely neoliberal capital, by way of considering Lacan's account of capitalist discourse in Seminar 17 - together with its insightful interpretation by Juliet MacCannell - particularly the relation between surplus value and surplus enjoyment. <![CDATA[<b>HIV advice in the media: Implications for reinventing subjectivity</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462017000100003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Working within a Foucauldian approach to governmentality and the ethics of self-care, this article analyzes the implications of the values upheld for caring and governing oneself in the HIV advice column of Criselda Sambeso Dudumashe, publicly HIV-positive herself. The analysis reveals that the central thrust of the advice advances the principle of investing in oneself and taking responsibility for one's physical and psychological health. Careful self-evaluation for self-improvement, however, means expending time and energy monitoring viral load, CD4 count and physical health. Likewise, monitoring one's adherence to HIV therapy requires careful evaluation of one's psychological state, including personal anxieties and fears, as well as the willingness to pursue qualified assistance from experts. Such self-government, it is argued, conjures up a subjective formation whose own discretion on how to gain control of HIV is oriented toward engaging with the best scientific practices and expert advice for its consolidation. In view of the emerging role played by similar platforms on and offline, an exploration of how the self is set in relation to itself, and how self-improvement is governed, offers insight into the contours of subjectivity in the post-AIDS era of treatment possibility. <![CDATA[<b>Love as radical politics</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462017000100004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt With the "affective turn" in social studies, the discussion of the role of emotions in social and political life is increasingly becoming a valid topic of inquiry. However, it is the "negative" emotions, like fear, anger, shame, that tend to dominate the discussions, with less attention being given to discussions of hope, compassion, and love. Srecko Horvat's The radicality of loveis an attempt to correct this bias. His text makes a case for the social importance of love in the reinvention of revolutionary politics. He does this through a discussion of some of the revolutions of the twentieth century, as well as some of the (revolutionary) social movements of the twenty first century. <![CDATA[<b>Media and the making of migrants</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462017000100005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt With the "affective turn" in social studies, the discussion of the role of emotions in social and political life is increasingly becoming a valid topic of inquiry. However, it is the "negative" emotions, like fear, anger, shame, that tend to dominate the discussions, with less attention being given to discussions of hope, compassion, and love. Srecko Horvat's The radicality of loveis an attempt to correct this bias. His text makes a case for the social importance of love in the reinvention of revolutionary politics. He does this through a discussion of some of the revolutions of the twentieth century, as well as some of the (revolutionary) social movements of the twenty first century. <![CDATA[<b>An art that obscures: Baderoon regarding Muslims</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462017000100006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt With the "affective turn" in social studies, the discussion of the role of emotions in social and political life is increasingly becoming a valid topic of inquiry. However, it is the "negative" emotions, like fear, anger, shame, that tend to dominate the discussions, with less attention being given to discussions of hope, compassion, and love. Srecko Horvat's The radicality of loveis an attempt to correct this bias. His text makes a case for the social importance of love in the reinvention of revolutionary politics. He does this through a discussion of some of the revolutions of the twentieth century, as well as some of the (revolutionary) social movements of the twenty first century. <![CDATA[<b>Lacanian psychoanalysis against psychology</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462017000100007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt With the "affective turn" in social studies, the discussion of the role of emotions in social and political life is increasingly becoming a valid topic of inquiry. However, it is the "negative" emotions, like fear, anger, shame, that tend to dominate the discussions, with less attention being given to discussions of hope, compassion, and love. Srecko Horvat's The radicality of loveis an attempt to correct this bias. His text makes a case for the social importance of love in the reinvention of revolutionary politics. He does this through a discussion of some of the revolutions of the twentieth century, as well as some of the (revolutionary) social movements of the twenty first century. <![CDATA[<b>Professional prejudice: Are psychology and psychiatry helping or hindering our understanding of sexualities and gender?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462017000100008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt With the "affective turn" in social studies, the discussion of the role of emotions in social and political life is increasingly becoming a valid topic of inquiry. However, it is the "negative" emotions, like fear, anger, shame, that tend to dominate the discussions, with less attention being given to discussions of hope, compassion, and love. Srecko Horvat's The radicality of loveis an attempt to correct this bias. His text makes a case for the social importance of love in the reinvention of revolutionary politics. He does this through a discussion of some of the revolutions of the twentieth century, as well as some of the (revolutionary) social movements of the twenty first century. <![CDATA[<b>Critical discursive psychology: In and against Psychology</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462017000100009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt With the "affective turn" in social studies, the discussion of the role of emotions in social and political life is increasingly becoming a valid topic of inquiry. However, it is the "negative" emotions, like fear, anger, shame, that tend to dominate the discussions, with less attention being given to discussions of hope, compassion, and love. Srecko Horvat's The radicality of loveis an attempt to correct this bias. His text makes a case for the social importance of love in the reinvention of revolutionary politics. He does this through a discussion of some of the revolutions of the twentieth century, as well as some of the (revolutionary) social movements of the twenty first century.