Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Psychology in Society]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=1015-604620160001&lang=en vol. num. 50 lang. en <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Sobukwe, psychology, and politics</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462016000100001&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en <![CDATA[<b>Sobukwe and the psychosocial</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462016000100002&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The political writings of Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe, like those of Anton Muziwakhe Lembede and Steve Bantu Biko, are shot through with psychological notions (ideas of consciousness, mental emancipation, psychological enslavement, self-realization, the African personality, etc.). The use of such terms is not psychological in a strict disciplinary sense, yet it is nevertheless of crucial psychosocial relevance for a number of reasons. Firstly, such a borrowing of terms necessarily breaks down the partitioning of the psychical and the political. Secondly, by being extracted from the discourse of psychology and subjected to a psychosocial application, these terms are rendered politically operative and put to immediate socio-political use as part of the struggle against white supremacy. Thirdly, the psychological vernacular historically deployed by Sobukwe, Lembede and Biko, effectively called attention to aspects of the struggle not adequately foregrounded by political vocabularies of the time. It was in this way that the aligned discourses of African Nationalism and Black Consciousness as realized in the writings of Sobukwe, Lembede and Biko, sought to overcome an otherwise flawed mode of political resistance - the gradualist, petitioning stance of the African National Congress in the 1950s - with something altogether more radical. <![CDATA[<b>Asazi ukuthi iyozala nkomoni: Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe's historical imagination of the future</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462016000100003&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This study will attempt to foreground the various underlying facets of Sobukwe's historical imagination and social philosophy through a close reading of his speeches and writings. It will be shown how Sobukwe's thought contains important observations for the study of identity, culture, history, and society; all concepts that are also of great importance to the field of psychosocial studies. The specific psychosocial dimension of Sobukwe's thought lies in an attention to the role of the historical imagination, what we can tentatively name a historical form of consciousness. This is a form of consciousness that stands in opposition to and looks beyond what is confined and prescribed as the current and its possibilities. The interrelationship between psychological and political liberation will be explored and expanded upon through a focus on the role that history plays in both. It will be shown how Sobukwe, together with other intellectuals and politicians associated with Pan-Africanism and African Nationalism, mobilised history as a theatre of struggle that tied together the realms of the psychological and the political in the quest for African liberation. <![CDATA[<b>Gail Gerhart interviews Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe (1970)</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462016000100004&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This study will attempt to foreground the various underlying facets of Sobukwe's historical imagination and social philosophy through a close reading of his speeches and writings. It will be shown how Sobukwe's thought contains important observations for the study of identity, culture, history, and society; all concepts that are also of great importance to the field of psychosocial studies. The specific psychosocial dimension of Sobukwe's thought lies in an attention to the role of the historical imagination, what we can tentatively name a historical form of consciousness. This is a form of consciousness that stands in opposition to and looks beyond what is confined and prescribed as the current and its possibilities. The interrelationship between psychological and political liberation will be explored and expanded upon through a focus on the role that history plays in both. It will be shown how Sobukwe, together with other intellectuals and politicians associated with Pan-Africanism and African Nationalism, mobilised history as a theatre of struggle that tied together the realms of the psychological and the political in the quest for African liberation. <![CDATA[<b> "To whom does the land belong?" Mogobe Bernard Ramose talks to Derek Hook</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462016000100005&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This study will attempt to foreground the various underlying facets of Sobukwe's historical imagination and social philosophy through a close reading of his speeches and writings. It will be shown how Sobukwe's thought contains important observations for the study of identity, culture, history, and society; all concepts that are also of great importance to the field of psychosocial studies. The specific psychosocial dimension of Sobukwe's thought lies in an attention to the role of the historical imagination, what we can tentatively name a historical form of consciousness. This is a form of consciousness that stands in opposition to and looks beyond what is confined and prescribed as the current and its possibilities. The interrelationship between psychological and political liberation will be explored and expanded upon through a focus on the role that history plays in both. It will be shown how Sobukwe, together with other intellectuals and politicians associated with Pan-Africanism and African Nationalism, mobilised history as a theatre of struggle that tied together the realms of the psychological and the political in the quest for African liberation. <![CDATA[<b>In search of the missing Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462016000100006&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This study will attempt to foreground the various underlying facets of Sobukwe's historical imagination and social philosophy through a close reading of his speeches and writings. It will be shown how Sobukwe's thought contains important observations for the study of identity, culture, history, and society; all concepts that are also of great importance to the field of psychosocial studies. The specific psychosocial dimension of Sobukwe's thought lies in an attention to the role of the historical imagination, what we can tentatively name a historical form of consciousness. This is a form of consciousness that stands in opposition to and looks beyond what is confined and prescribed as the current and its possibilities. The interrelationship between psychological and political liberation will be explored and expanded upon through a focus on the role that history plays in both. It will be shown how Sobukwe, together with other intellectuals and politicians associated with Pan-Africanism and African Nationalism, mobilised history as a theatre of struggle that tied together the realms of the psychological and the political in the quest for African liberation. <![CDATA[<b>Neil Aggett: A man of the people</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462016000100007&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This study will attempt to foreground the various underlying facets of Sobukwe's historical imagination and social philosophy through a close reading of his speeches and writings. It will be shown how Sobukwe's thought contains important observations for the study of identity, culture, history, and society; all concepts that are also of great importance to the field of psychosocial studies. The specific psychosocial dimension of Sobukwe's thought lies in an attention to the role of the historical imagination, what we can tentatively name a historical form of consciousness. This is a form of consciousness that stands in opposition to and looks beyond what is confined and prescribed as the current and its possibilities. The interrelationship between psychological and political liberation will be explored and expanded upon through a focus on the role that history plays in both. It will be shown how Sobukwe, together with other intellectuals and politicians associated with Pan-Africanism and African Nationalism, mobilised history as a theatre of struggle that tied together the realms of the psychological and the political in the quest for African liberation. <![CDATA[<b>Not to be judged by its cover</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462016000100008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This study will attempt to foreground the various underlying facets of Sobukwe's historical imagination and social philosophy through a close reading of his speeches and writings. It will be shown how Sobukwe's thought contains important observations for the study of identity, culture, history, and society; all concepts that are also of great importance to the field of psychosocial studies. The specific psychosocial dimension of Sobukwe's thought lies in an attention to the role of the historical imagination, what we can tentatively name a historical form of consciousness. This is a form of consciousness that stands in opposition to and looks beyond what is confined and prescribed as the current and its possibilities. The interrelationship between psychological and political liberation will be explored and expanded upon through a focus on the role that history plays in both. It will be shown how Sobukwe, together with other intellectuals and politicians associated with Pan-Africanism and African Nationalism, mobilised history as a theatre of struggle that tied together the realms of the psychological and the political in the quest for African liberation.