Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Psychology in Society]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=1015-604620150001&lang=en vol. num. 48 lang. en <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Capitalism and suffering</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462015000100001&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The present article is an exploration of the relationship between neoliberal capitalism and suffering in a broad sense, which includes everything from economic and physical suffering, psychic suffering in the form of anxiety, self-doubt, uncertainty and stress, to more acute suffering, such as identifiable pathologies. Its point of departure is the patho-analytic principle, that one can gain an understanding of the general psychic condition of humanity by focusing on the characteristic traits of a pathology such as, for example, obsessional neurosis, and examining the possibility that some of these characteristics are encountered in the population at large. Focusing first on evidence of severe economic suffering under the impact of what Klein calls "disaster capitalism", the argument proceeds to Parker's claim, that the typical subject under capitalism displays the character of obsessional neurosis, then to Salecl's examination of capitalism's "ideology of choice", Verhaeghe's investigation of the effects of a market-based economy on psychic health, and Federici's claim that there are signs of increasing resistance to capitalist labour. It concludes with some prospective thoughts on Salecl's, and Hardt and Negri's diagnosis of present social conditions under capitalism. <![CDATA[<b>Cross-cultural differences in the character strength of citizenship in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462015000100002&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The psychological conceptualisation of the character strength of citizenship as a trait ubiquitous across cultures is examined within the context of a diverse South African sample. The theoretically supposed elements common to the definition of citizenship as a dispositional trait (rather than a situational or cultural phenomenon) are examined by means of considering Peterson and Seligman's (2004) conceptualisation of citizenship as espoused in their work on character strength and virtues. Using the Rasch model of item response theory the International Personality Item Pool (IPIP) Value in Action Inventory (VIA) Citizenship scale was examined for fit and differential item functioning (DIF). A diverse sample of 902 South African university students who completed the Citizenship scale was examined for DIF as a function of self-asserted ethnicities and home language groups, which serve as indicators of culture within the South African context. The findings of the study suggest that while certain conceptual aspects of trait-based citizenship as espoused by Peterson and Seligman (2004) are common across the heterogeneous cultures (as defined by ethnicity and language group) examined, there is sound evidence that there are also qualitative distinctions that are exclusively a function of cultural grouping, suggesting difficulties with the exclusive conceptualisation of citizenship as an individual trait. The implications of these findings speak to the importance of considering citizenship as a nuanced and complex notion that requires further consideration in terms of the philosophical, theoretical and empirical qualification of its conceptualisation. <![CDATA[<b>Pedagogical variation with computers in mathematics classrooms: A Cultural Historical Activity Theory analysis</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462015000100003&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en South Africa's crisis in mathematics attainment is well documented (DBE, 2013; Spaull, 2014; WEF, 2014). To meet the need to develop students' mathematical performance in schools the government has launched various initiatives using computers to impact on mathematical attainment. While it is clear that computers can change pedagogical practices, there is a dearth of qualitative studies indicating exactly how pedagogy is transformed with Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) in a teaching activity. Consequently, this paper addresses the following question: how, along which dimensions in an activity, does pedagogy alter with the use of computer drill and practice software in four disadvantaged grade 6 mathematics classrooms in the Western Cape province of South Africa? The paper draws on Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) to develop a view of pedagogy as socially situated. Four ideal pedagogical types are identified: Reinforcement pedagogy, which has the reinforcement of specialised knowledge as its object; Collaborative pedagogy, which has the development of metacognitive engagement with specialised knowledge as its object; Directive pedagogy, which has the development of technical task skills as its object, and finally, Defensive pedagogy, which has student regulation as its object. Face-to- face lessons were characterised as predominantly Reinforcement and Collaborative pedagogy and most computer lessons were characterised as mainly either Defensive or Directive. <![CDATA[<b>Thinking about incarceration in South Africa: The Inside-out Outside-in interest group</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462015000100004&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article provides a reflective discussion as seen through the gaze of the recently formed Inside-out Outside-in South African Corrections Interest Group, about incarceration and the people who are affected by life inside and outside prisons. The main focus of the White Paper on Corrections in South Africa is the necessity to identify corrections as being focused on rehabilitation and as a responsibility that the Department of Correctional Services shares with society at large. Hawkins (1982) refers to correctional officers as "the other prisoners", and in this reflective discussion, society at large is considered as "the other correctional officers" in reviewing attempts to give substance to the Department of Correctional Services' objectives of corrections and rehabilitation in partnership with society. In particular, community engagement initiatives of the Inside-out Group linked to communities inside and outside the corrections environment in South Africa are highlighted. <![CDATA[<b>Beyond binary thinking: Making sense of modernity as a historical phenomenon</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462015000100005&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article provides a reflective discussion as seen through the gaze of the recently formed Inside-out Outside-in South African Corrections Interest Group, about incarceration and the people who are affected by life inside and outside prisons. The main focus of the White Paper on Corrections in South Africa is the necessity to identify corrections as being focused on rehabilitation and as a responsibility that the Department of Correctional Services shares with society at large. Hawkins (1982) refers to correctional officers as "the other prisoners", and in this reflective discussion, society at large is considered as "the other correctional officers" in reviewing attempts to give substance to the Department of Correctional Services' objectives of corrections and rehabilitation in partnership with society. In particular, community engagement initiatives of the Inside-out Group linked to communities inside and outside the corrections environment in South Africa are highlighted. <![CDATA[<b>A broadly narrow map of intellectual traditions</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462015000100006&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article provides a reflective discussion as seen through the gaze of the recently formed Inside-out Outside-in South African Corrections Interest Group, about incarceration and the people who are affected by life inside and outside prisons. The main focus of the White Paper on Corrections in South Africa is the necessity to identify corrections as being focused on rehabilitation and as a responsibility that the Department of Correctional Services shares with society at large. Hawkins (1982) refers to correctional officers as "the other prisoners", and in this reflective discussion, society at large is considered as "the other correctional officers" in reviewing attempts to give substance to the Department of Correctional Services' objectives of corrections and rehabilitation in partnership with society. In particular, community engagement initiatives of the Inside-out Group linked to communities inside and outside the corrections environment in South Africa are highlighted. <![CDATA[<b>Identity politics: A view from the South</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462015000100007&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article provides a reflective discussion as seen through the gaze of the recently formed Inside-out Outside-in South African Corrections Interest Group, about incarceration and the people who are affected by life inside and outside prisons. The main focus of the White Paper on Corrections in South Africa is the necessity to identify corrections as being focused on rehabilitation and as a responsibility that the Department of Correctional Services shares with society at large. Hawkins (1982) refers to correctional officers as "the other prisoners", and in this reflective discussion, society at large is considered as "the other correctional officers" in reviewing attempts to give substance to the Department of Correctional Services' objectives of corrections and rehabilitation in partnership with society. In particular, community engagement initiatives of the Inside-out Group linked to communities inside and outside the corrections environment in South Africa are highlighted. <![CDATA[<b>Culture, narrative and collective trauma</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462015000100008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article provides a reflective discussion as seen through the gaze of the recently formed Inside-out Outside-in South African Corrections Interest Group, about incarceration and the people who are affected by life inside and outside prisons. The main focus of the White Paper on Corrections in South Africa is the necessity to identify corrections as being focused on rehabilitation and as a responsibility that the Department of Correctional Services shares with society at large. Hawkins (1982) refers to correctional officers as "the other prisoners", and in this reflective discussion, society at large is considered as "the other correctional officers" in reviewing attempts to give substance to the Department of Correctional Services' objectives of corrections and rehabilitation in partnership with society. In particular, community engagement initiatives of the Inside-out Group linked to communities inside and outside the corrections environment in South Africa are highlighted. <![CDATA[<b>The father is dead! Long live the father!</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462015000100009&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article provides a reflective discussion as seen through the gaze of the recently formed Inside-out Outside-in South African Corrections Interest Group, about incarceration and the people who are affected by life inside and outside prisons. The main focus of the White Paper on Corrections in South Africa is the necessity to identify corrections as being focused on rehabilitation and as a responsibility that the Department of Correctional Services shares with society at large. Hawkins (1982) refers to correctional officers as "the other prisoners", and in this reflective discussion, society at large is considered as "the other correctional officers" in reviewing attempts to give substance to the Department of Correctional Services' objectives of corrections and rehabilitation in partnership with society. In particular, community engagement initiatives of the Inside-out Group linked to communities inside and outside the corrections environment in South Africa are highlighted. <![CDATA[<b>Mapping anxiety</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462015000100010&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article provides a reflective discussion as seen through the gaze of the recently formed Inside-out Outside-in South African Corrections Interest Group, about incarceration and the people who are affected by life inside and outside prisons. The main focus of the White Paper on Corrections in South Africa is the necessity to identify corrections as being focused on rehabilitation and as a responsibility that the Department of Correctional Services shares with society at large. Hawkins (1982) refers to correctional officers as "the other prisoners", and in this reflective discussion, society at large is considered as "the other correctional officers" in reviewing attempts to give substance to the Department of Correctional Services' objectives of corrections and rehabilitation in partnership with society. In particular, community engagement initiatives of the Inside-out Group linked to communities inside and outside the corrections environment in South Africa are highlighted. <![CDATA[<b>Fit for purpose</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1015-60462015000100011&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article provides a reflective discussion as seen through the gaze of the recently formed Inside-out Outside-in South African Corrections Interest Group, about incarceration and the people who are affected by life inside and outside prisons. The main focus of the White Paper on Corrections in South Africa is the necessity to identify corrections as being focused on rehabilitation and as a responsibility that the Department of Correctional Services shares with society at large. Hawkins (1982) refers to correctional officers as "the other prisoners", and in this reflective discussion, society at large is considered as "the other correctional officers" in reviewing attempts to give substance to the Department of Correctional Services' objectives of corrections and rehabilitation in partnership with society. In particular, community engagement initiatives of the Inside-out Group linked to communities inside and outside the corrections environment in South Africa are highlighted.